Special Issue "The Impact of Climate Change and Anthropogenic Activities on Watershed Eco-Hydrology"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Ecohydrology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 28 February 2023 | Viewed by 1925

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Xuan Zhang
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
College of Water Sciences, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875, China
Interests: drought; extreme climate; eco-hydrology; hydrological simulation
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Xiran Li
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
College of Urban & Environmental Science, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079, China
Interests: vegetation dynamics; extreme climate; water balance

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Climate change and extreme events such as drought, flood, and heat waves are the most notable factors influencing the water cycle and vegetation at the watershed scale. Not only does precipitation variability interfere with the water cycle, but evapotranspiration change induced by global warming and vegetation cover alternation also results in significant changes in the hydrological process. Anthropogenic impact is another major factor influencing the quantity and quality of water resources by disturbing the eco-hydrological process. With the population and urbanization growth, irrigation, soil and water conservation projects, industrial and domestic water extraction, and water regulations can profoundly alter the hydrological process.

This Special Issue aims to address new research on the topic of eco-hydrological response under climate change and anthropogenic impact using either statistical analysis or hydrological models. The application of new approaches such as deep learning methods and multiple-source data analysis is especially encouraged. Scenario simulation about future hydrological process variability under climate change, human-induced vegetation change, or anthropogenic activities is also welcome in this Special Issue.

This Special Issue of Water invites papers related to the subject of “Response of Watershed Eco-Hydrological Processes to Climate Change and Anthropogenic Impact”. Topics of interest include but are not limited to:

  • Hydrological process change variability detection
  • Coupled simulation of ecology and hydrology
  • Vegetation response to climate change or extreme events
  • Hydrological response to extreme weather
  • Application of multi-data remote sensing on watershed eco-hydrology
  • Response of vegetation to floods and droughts
  • Impact of irrigation practices on ecosystems and environment
  • Remote-sensing-based eco-hydrology process modeling

Dr. Xuan Zhang
Dr. Xiran Li
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • extreme events
  • hydrological simulation
  • eco-hydrological process
  • vegetation dynamics
  • watershed hydrology
  • anthropogenic impact
  • multi-source data analysis
  • machine learning and deep learning

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Land-Use and Land Cover Is Driving Factor of Runoff Yield: Evidence from A Remote Sensing-Based Runoff Generation Simulation
Water 2022, 14(18), 2854; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14182854 - 13 Sep 2022
Viewed by 688
Abstract
The spatial distribution of water storage capacity has always been the critical content of the study of saturation-excess runoff. Xin’anjiang model uses the water storage capacity curve (WSCC) to characterize the distribution of water storage capacity for runoff yield calculation. However, the mathematical [...] Read more.
The spatial distribution of water storage capacity has always been the critical content of the study of saturation-excess runoff. Xin’anjiang model uses the water storage capacity curve (WSCC) to characterize the distribution of water storage capacity for runoff yield calculation. However, the mathematical and physical foundations of WSCC are unclear, which is impossible to simulate runoff generation with complex basins accurately. To fill this gap, we considered the dominant role of basin physical characteristics in water storage capacity and developed a new integrated approach to solve the spatial distribution of water storage capacity (L-WSCC) to account for the spatiotemporal dynamics of their impact on runoff generation. The main contribution of L-WSCC was to confer WSCC more physical meaning and the spatial distribution of water storage capacity was explicitly represented more accurately, so as to better express the runoff generation and provide a new approach for runoff yield calculation in non-data basin. L-WSCC was applied to Misai basin in China and promising results had been achieved, which verified the rationality of the method (the mean Nash–Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE):0.86 and 0.82 in daily and hourly scale, respectively). Compared with WSCC, the performance of L-WSCC was improved (mean NSE: 0.82 > 0.78, mean absolute value of flood peak error (PE): 12.74% < 21.66%). Moreover, the results of local sensitivity analyses demonstrated that land-use and land cover was the major driving factor of runoff yield (the change of mean absolute error (ΔMAE): 131.38%). This work was significant for understanding the mechanisms of runoff generation, which can be used for hydrological environmental management and land-use planning. Full article
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Article
Identifying Spatial Patterns of Hydrologic Drought over the Southeast US Using Retrospective National Water Model Simulations
Water 2022, 14(10), 1525; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14101525 - 10 May 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 733
Abstract
Given the sensitivity of natural environments to freshwater availability in the Southeast US, as well as the reliance of many municipal and commercial water consumers on surface water supplies, specific issues related to low river streamflow are apparent. As a result, the need [...] Read more.
Given the sensitivity of natural environments to freshwater availability in the Southeast US, as well as the reliance of many municipal and commercial water consumers on surface water supplies, specific issues related to low river streamflow are apparent. As a result, the need for quantifying the spatial distribution, frequency, and intensity of low flow events (a.k.a., hydrologic drought) is critical to define areas most susceptible to water shortages and subsequent environmental and societal risk. To that end, daily mean discharge values from the National Water Model (NWM) retrospective data (v. 2.0) are used to assess low flow frequency, intensity, and spatial distribution within the Southeast US. Low flow events are defined using the US EPA 7Q10 approach, based on the flow duration curve (FDC) developed using a 1993–2018 period of record. Results reflect the general climatological patterns of the region, with a higher probability of low flow events occurring during the warm season (June–August) while low flow events in the cool season (January–March) are generally less common and have a higher average discharge. Spatial analysis shows substantial regional variability, with an area from southeastern Mississippi through central South Carolina showing higher low flow event frequency during the cool season. This same area is also highlighted in the warm season, albeit along a more expansive area from central Alabama into the piedmont region of North Carolina. Results indicate that the NWM retrospective data are able to show general patterns of hydrologic drought across the Southeast US, although local-scale assessment is limited due to potential issues associated with infiltration and runoff during periods of warm-season convective rainfall. Full article
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Impact of Annual Water Recession Process to Wetland Cover of Poyang Lake using Sentinel Data
Author: Wenxia Tan; Hemiao Dai
Affiliation: Key Laboratory for Geographical Process Analysis & Simulation of Hubei Province, College of Urban & Environmental Sciences, Central China Normal University, Wuhan, 430079, China
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