Special Issue "Circle Sustainability of Wastewater and Sludge Treatment"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Wastewater Treatment and Reuse".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (5 December 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Ewa Neczaj
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Infrastructure and Environment, Czestochowa University of Technology, Poland
Interests: environmental biotechnology; wastewater treatment; anaerobic digestion; AOPs; sludge treatment and disposal; circular economy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) can be an important part of circular sustainability due to integration of energy production and resource recovery during treated wastewater production. Global nutrient needs and the growing demand for water and energy in the world are the main reasons for implementing a circular economy concept in WWTPs and the promotion of innovative, cost-effective, and high-performance wastewater and sewage sludge treatment systems. Those novel generation treatment technologies must be able to produce high-quality treated effluent to reuse for agriculture and land irrigation, industrial purposes, toilet flushing, groundwater replenishing, as well as drinking water. Wastewater and sewage sludge are also a new renewable source of energy and materials. WWTPs are considered as a biorefineries to produce, e.g., biofuels, biogas, bioplastics, fertilizers, and constructed materials. In this Special Issue, we would like to bring together papers on the state-of-the-art of environmental technologies for sustainable development of WWTPs, including principles of wastewater and sewage sludge treatment, recourses recovery, as well as challenges and barriers which prevent the implementation of innovative technologies at the water sector.

Prof. Ewa Neczaj
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • wastewater treatment
  • sewage sludge treatment
  • resource recovery
  • biorefineries
  • water reuse
  • circular economy

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
Measurement and Modelling of Moisture Distribution and Water Binding Energy of Dredged Sludge
Water 2020, 12(12), 3395; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12123395 - 02 Dec 2020
Viewed by 725
Abstract
The dewatering of dredged sludge is a critical step in the minimization and reutilization of this solid waste. However, there is a lack of available literature on the fundamental drying characteristics of dredged sludge. In this work, two kinds of typical sludge dredged [...] Read more.
The dewatering of dredged sludge is a critical step in the minimization and reutilization of this solid waste. However, there is a lack of available literature on the fundamental drying characteristics of dredged sludge. In this work, two kinds of typical sludge dredged from an urban watercourse were tested by low-field NMR to investigate the water distribution in sludge and it was found that water contained in sludge can be classified into three categories: free water, capillary water and bound water. In addition, a novel model was proposed based on the Lennard-Jones equation and Kelvin law to quantitatively evaluate the binding energy during drying. Further, the model results were experimentally verified by thermogravimetry differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA). Results show that the trends of the model are consistent with the experimental values and the gradient of energy consumption during dehydration can be divided into three main stages. In stage 1, the total energy required for dewatering equals the latent heat of free water. In stage 2, binding energy reaches dozens to hundreds of kJ/kg accounting for capillary action. In stage 3, binding energy increases steeply reaching almost thousands of kJ/kg due to intermolecular interactions. All the discovered aspects could improve the management and disposal of dredged sludge from an energy cost perspective. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Circle Sustainability of Wastewater and Sludge Treatment)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Performance of Anaerobic Digestion of Acidified Palm Oil Mill Effluent under Various Organic Loading Rates and Temperatures
Water 2020, 12(9), 2432; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12092432 - 29 Aug 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 794
Abstract
This study compared the performance of thermophilic and mesophilic digesters of an anaerobic digestion system from palm oil mill effluent (POME), in which temperature is a key parameter that can greatly affect the performance of anaerobic digestion. The digesters were incubated at two [...] Read more.
This study compared the performance of thermophilic and mesophilic digesters of an anaerobic digestion system from palm oil mill effluent (POME), in which temperature is a key parameter that can greatly affect the performance of anaerobic digestion. The digesters were incubated at two distinct temperatures of 55 and 37 °C, and operated with varying organic loading rates (OLRs) of 2.4, 3.2, and 4.0 g COD/L.d by altering the chemical oxygen demand (COD) of acidified POME during feeding. The results indicated that the performance of anaerobic digestion increased as the OLR increased from 2.4 to 4.0 g COD/L.d. At the OLR of 4.0 g COD/L.d, the thermophilic condition showed the highest methane yield of 0.31 ± 0.01 L/g COD, accompanied by the highest COD removal and volatile solid reduction, which were found to be higher than the mesophilic condition. Microbial community analysis via denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) revealed that Methanothermobacter sp. emerges as the dominant microbe, which is known to utilize the carbon dioxide pathway with hydrogen acting as an electron donor for methane formation Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Circle Sustainability of Wastewater and Sludge Treatment)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Article
The Use of Chemical Methods and Magnetic Field in Conditioning and Dewatering of Digested Sewage Sludge
Water 2020, 12(6), 1642; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12061642 - 08 Jun 2020
Viewed by 567
Abstract
This study verified the possibility of sludge conditioning before dewatering using a combination of factors such as iron coagulant, polyelectrolyte, and the magnetic field generated by a solenoid. It was assumed that further conditioning with the magnetic field, leads to the formation of [...] Read more.
This study verified the possibility of sludge conditioning before dewatering using a combination of factors such as iron coagulant, polyelectrolyte, and the magnetic field generated by a solenoid. It was assumed that further conditioning with the magnetic field, leads to the formation of a rigid structure of sludge flocs by the destabilized and flocculated solid phase particles in the sludge (using the conditioning dual chemical method: PIX—polyelectrolyte). The resulting structure can increase the efficiency of sludge cake filtration by reducing sludge compressibility and maintaining the porosity necessary for the flow of removed water through the filter cake. The effects of the exposure of conditioned sludge (after the dual chemical method) to the magnetic field depended on two factors. The first factor was the direction of sludge flow through the magnetic field. This was a key factor in improving the efficiency of sludge conditioning using this method. The sludge flow through the solenoid in the direction opposite to the magnetic field had a strong effect on the particles. The second factor was the rate of sludge flow through the magnetic field. Better results were obtained for a flow rate of 1.0 L/min than for pumping sludge through a coil at a rate of 2.0 L/min. At a flow rate of 1.0 L/min, the exposure time of the sludge to the magnetic field was 6.6 s. Too high a flow rate may lead to the deterioration of filtration efficiency by adverse changes in the structure of sludge flocs. This may be due to the mechanical destruction of the flocs structure of sludge by a too turbulent flow. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Circle Sustainability of Wastewater and Sludge Treatment)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop