Special Issue "Harmful Cyanobacterial Blooms (HCBs) in Freshwaters–an Increasing Global Concern"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Water and One Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 November 2022 | Viewed by 1102

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Daniela R. De Figueiredo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biology & CESAM (Centre for Environmental and Marine Studies), Universidade de Aveiro, Aveiro, Portugal
Interests: aquatic microbial ecology; cyanobacterial blooms; environmental education; science communication

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Harmful cyanobacterial Blooms (HCBs) are predicted to become more intense and frequent under the global warming context, with serious environmental and socio-economic consequences worldwide due to their ecological impacts and toxic outcomes.

Freshwater bodies, in particular, will be severely affected, with direct impacts for local communities. This makes research and monitoring approaches crucial to manage the water quality of inland waters, providing tools to control and mitigate the massive development of potentially toxic cyanobacteria. On the other hand, environmental awareness and participative science approaches with local populations may play an important role in developing and implementing integrated water management strategies. This Special Issue of Water intends to gather recent research trends for freshwater HCBs, namely regarding: (1) monitoring approaches (from in situ to remote sensing methodologies); (2) occurrence and ecological trends (from metagenomics to biogeography); (3) secondary metabolites (from production to quantification and toxicity); (4) alternative water treatment methodologies;  (5 )Forecasting approaches using AI (Artificial Intelligence)-based predictive modelling; (6) environmental awareness and citizen science.

Dr. Daniela R. De Figueiredo
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • cyanobacterial blooms
  • inland waters
  • monitoring approaches
  • ecology
  • secondary metabolites
  • environmental awareness
  • citizen science

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Removal of Cylindrospermopsin by Adsorption on Granular Activated Carbon, Selection of Carbons and Estimated Fixed-Bed Breakthrough
Water 2022, 14(10), 1630; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14101630 - 19 May 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 560
Abstract
Climate change and the increase in the availability of nutrients in aquatic environments have increased the occurrence of cyanobacterial blooms which can produce cyanotoxins such as cylindrospermopsin (CYN). Activated carbon adsorption have been proved to be efficient for CYN removal. In the present [...] Read more.
Climate change and the increase in the availability of nutrients in aquatic environments have increased the occurrence of cyanobacterial blooms which can produce cyanotoxins such as cylindrospermopsin (CYN). Activated carbon adsorption have been proved to be efficient for CYN removal. In the present study, a carbon with high CYN adsorption capacity was identified between two granular activated carbons. For this carbon was estimated the operating time of a full-scale granular activated carbon column under different empty bed contact times (EBCT). The fixed-bed breakthrough was estimated using the Homogeneous Surface Diffusion Model (HSDM). Wood carbon showed greater capacity to remove CYN. The experimental equilibrium data best fitted Langmuir isotherm model, in which wood carbon had a maximum adsorption capacity of 3.67 μg/mg and Langmuir adsorption constant of 0.2791 L/μg. The methodology produced satisfactory results where the HSDM simulated the fixed-bed breakthrough with a coefficient of determination of 0.89, to the film diffusion coefficient (Kf) of 9 × 106  m/s and surface diffusion coefficient (Ds) of 3 × 10−16 m2/s. It was observed that the increase in EBCT promotes a reduction in the carbon use rate. The best carbon use rate found was 0.43 kg/m3 for a EBCT of 10 min and breakthrough time of 183.6 h. Full article
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