Impacts of Climate Change and Anthropogenic Pressure on Freshwater Ecosystems

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Biodiversity and Functionality of Aquatic Ecosystems".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2024 | Viewed by 1832

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Ecology and Environmental Protection, Poznan University of Life Sciences, Poznan, Poland
Interests: freshwater protection; eutrophication; river sediments; mine waters; hydromorphology; bioindication; water quality
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Biology, Adam Mickiewicz University Poznan, Poznan, Poland
Interests: hydrobiology; phycology; bioindication; biodiversity; eutrophication; lakes; algal blooms

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Environmental Development, Warsaw University of Life Sciences, Warsaw, Poland
Interests: physiology of plants and algae, chlorophyll fluorescence; wetlands; photosynthesis; plant stresses
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The observed increase in anthropogenic pressure on the environment together with the presence of climate change is leading to severe problems in terms of water quality and the availability of water in many regions throughout the world. The spreading of scientific knowledge concerning problems related to modern freshwater protection is necessary both due to growing concern and the emerging scientific issues, ones which have not been seen before in most cases. Climate change affects water scarcity and is increasing the risk of extreme weather events on regional and global scales. The growing presence of plastics, metals, toxins, and pharmaceuticals is strengthening an already difficult situation.

The Guest Editors invite authors to contribute their reviews and research papers on the impact of climate change and all aspects of anthropogenic pressure on freshwater ecosystem, particularly those which have been studied using modern techniques and tools.

This Special Issue aims to publish research results from the following areas:

  • Global change ecology;
  • Aquatic biological systems;
  • Remote sensing of aquatic ecosystem processes;
  • Air–water gas exchange in lakes and reservoirs;
  • Extreme phenomena;
  • Heated waters;
  • Mine waters in aquatic ecosystems;
  • Plastic pollution in freshwater;
  • Industrial and agricultural pollution;
  • Inventory and monitoring of natural and semi natural habitats;
  • Environmental impact assessments;
  • Invasive species;
  • Biological diversity;
  • Drought and water level changes;
  • Harmful freshwater algae.

Dr. Ryszard Staniszewski
Dr. Beata Messyasz
Dr. Piotr Dąbrowski
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • freshwater ecosystem
  • anthropogenic pressure
  • global warming
  • water temperature
  • plastic pollution
  • mining
  • energy industry
  • metals
  • biological diversity
  • algal blooms

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

15 pages, 4276 KiB  
Article
The Influence of Anthropogenic Pollution on the Physicochemical Conditions of the Waters of the Lower Section of the Sąpólna River
by Małgorzata Bonisławska, Arkadiusz Nędzarek, Agnieszka Rybczyk and Adam Tański
Water 2024, 16(1), 35; https://doi.org/10.3390/w16010035 - 21 Dec 2023
Viewed by 752
Abstract
River pollution resulting from unregulated and improper water sewage management is a global issue of concern. The discharge of inadequately treated sewage into rivers and the sudden release of excessive quantities during heavy rainfall can result in significant fish mortality. This phenomenon has [...] Read more.
River pollution resulting from unregulated and improper water sewage management is a global issue of concern. The discharge of inadequately treated sewage into rivers and the sudden release of excessive quantities during heavy rainfall can result in significant fish mortality. This phenomenon has been observed repeatedly in the case of the Sąpólna River, NW Poland. Consequently, a decision was made to monitor the water quality at two key locations: the drainage channel that feeds into the river and downstream of the channel. Seventeen water quality indicators were measured, including temperature, pH, conductivity, total suspended solids (TSS), dissolved oxygen (DO), biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5), chemical oxygen demand (CODCr), total organic carbon (TOC), alkalinity, total hardness, total reactive phosphorus (TRP), total phosphorus (TP), nitrite-nitrogen (NO2-N), nitrate-nitrogen (NO3-N), total ammonia nitrogen (NH4-N), total organic nitrogen (TON), and total nitrogen (TN). It was determined that, at the location farthest from the drainage channel, water quality still falls short of meeting the specified standards. The primary factors leading to the degradation of water quality at this point were TSS, TRP, NO2-N, and TN. It was concluded that the primary localized source of water pollution in the studied section of the Sąpólna River is the discharge from sewage treatment plants in Nowogard. Consequently, actions should be taken to address sewage quality and reduce discharge quantities. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

25 pages, 1717 KiB  
Review
Recent Issues and Challenges in the Study of Inland Waters
by Ryszard Staniszewski, Beata Messyasz, Piotr Dąbrowski, Pawel Burdziakowski and Marcin Spychała
Water 2024, 16(9), 1216; https://doi.org/10.3390/w16091216 - 24 Apr 2024
Viewed by 719
Abstract
This paper addresses several important problems and methods related to studies of inland waters based on the existing scientific literature. The use of UAVs in freshwater monitoring is described, including recent contact and non-contact solutions. Due to a decline in biological diversity in [...] Read more.
This paper addresses several important problems and methods related to studies of inland waters based on the existing scientific literature. The use of UAVs in freshwater monitoring is described, including recent contact and non-contact solutions. Due to a decline in biological diversity in many parts of the globe, the main threats are described together with a modern method for algae and cyanobacteria monitoring utilizing chlorophyll a fluorescence. Observed disturbances in the functioning of river biocenoses related to mine waters’ discharge, causing changes in the physico-chemical parameters of waters and sediments, give rise to the need to develop more accurate methods for the assessment of this phenomenon. Important problems occurring in the context of microplastic detection, including the lack of unification, standardization and repeatability of the methods used, were described. In conclusion, accurate results in the monitoring of water quality parameters of inland waters can be achieved by combining modern methods and using non-contact solutions. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop