Special Issue "Fluvial Processes and Denudation"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Hydrology and Hydrogeology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 October 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Achim A. Beylich
Website
Guest Editor
Geomorphological Field Laboratory (GFL), Sandviksgjerde, Strandvegen 484, 7584 Selbustrand, Norway
Interests: geomorphology; hydrology; process monitoring; fluvial processes and forms; fluvial transport; drainage basin systems; sedimentary budgets; source-to-sink fluxes; denudation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Fluvial processes and fluvial denudation, including both chemical and mechanical processes, are of high relevance for Earth surface and landscape development, as well as the fluvial transfer of solutes, nutrients, and sediments from headwater systems through the main stems of drainage basin systems to the World Ocean. Fluvial processes and fluvial denudation are controlled by a range of environmental drivers, and can be significantly affected by anthropogenic activities. A better understanding of the possible effects of the ongoing and accelerated environmental changes on present-day fluvial and denudational processes requires systematic and quantitative studies (including environmental monitoring) on the actual drivers of these processes. Only if we have an improved knowledge of the drivers and quantitative rates of contemporary fluvial and denudational processes, as well as knowledge of the connectivity in landscapes and within fluvial systems across a range of different spatial scales and selected climatic environments, can the possible effects of the global environmental changes on fluvial processes and fluvial denudation within defined drainage basin systems be better assessed. Special focus should be given to the drainage basin systems in selected climatic environments that are expected to react particularly sensitively to the ongoing and accelerated environmental changes.

Dr. Achim A. Beylich
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • fluvial system
  • fluvial processes
  • fluvial transport
  • denudation
  • connectivity
  • drainage basin system
  • landscape development
  • environmental drivers
  • climatic environments
  • environmental change
  • environmental monitoring

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Modelling of Erosion and Transport Processes
Water 2019, 11(12), 2604; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11122604 - 10 Dec 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Erosion phenomena are the result of complicated natural processes. The determination of their course, their mathematical expression, and predicting erosion phenomena of certain intensities is an important hydrological problem. To obtain a solution, it is necessary to evaluate the erosion factors in detail, [...] Read more.
Erosion phenomena are the result of complicated natural processes. The determination of their course, their mathematical expression, and predicting erosion phenomena of certain intensities is an important hydrological problem. To obtain a solution, it is necessary to evaluate the erosion factors in detail, which act by the origin and course of erosion processes, to analyse their influences, and to apply correct conclusions to their complex activity on this basis. Dimensional analysis is a conceptual tool often applied in engineering to understand physical situations involving a mix of different kinds of physical quantities. It is routinely used by physical scientists and engineers to check the plausibility of derived equations and computations. It is also used to form reasonable hypotheses about complex physical situations that can be tested by experiment or by more developed theories of the phenomena. In this paper, the dimensional analysis is used for the modelling of erosion and transport processes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fluvial Processes and Denudation)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

1. The role of changing snow and glacier-melting processes on suspended and bedload yield in an Andean catchment in central Chile (research article).

Luca Mao and Ricardo Carrillo

Title: Contemporary chemical and mechanical denudation in glacierized and non-glacierized cold climate drainage basin systems
Authors: Achim A. Beylich
Affiliation: Geomorphological Field Laboratory (GFL), Sandviksgjerde, Strandvegen 484, 7584 Selbustrand, Norway

Title: Landscape disturbances and downstream sediment connectivity in mountain rivers
Authors: Prof. Dr. Piotr Cienciala
Affiliation: Department of Geography and GIS University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign USA

Title: Inter-seasonal dominance of storm runoffs and riverine waves on bank erosion in the water level fluctuation zone of the Three Gorges Reservoir, China
Authors: Yuhai Baoa, Qiang Tanga,b*, Yunhua Huc, Jinlin Lia,d, Xiubin Hea*
Affiliation: a Key Laboratory of Mountain Surface Processes and Ecological Regulation, Institute of Mountain Hazards and Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu 610041 China b School of Geographical Sciences, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 China c The Third Surveying and Mapping Engineering Institute in Sichuan Province, Chengdu 610500, China d University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 China *Corresponding author: Institute of Mountain Hazards and Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 9, Block 4, South Renmin Road, Chengdu 610041 China. Tel.: +86-28-85232105, Fax: +86-28-85222258, Email: [email protected]
Abstract: Launch of the Three Gorges Reservoir on the upper Yangtze River has created a unique landform of the water level fluctuation zone, which has been subjected to seasonal exposure and inundation following regular dam operations. This reservoir marginal landscape has exhibited high susceptibility to erosion co-contributed by concentrated storm runoffs over the wet season when it is exposed to frequent storms and intensive stream waves generated by frequent navigation activities. Up to date, the detail processes and related mechanisms associated with these two agents in this landscape have been rarely reported. This study decouples bank erosion processes and described the pattern and mechanisms of bank erosion in the water level fluctuation zone. The magnitude of bank erosion was also quantified in a case study using photogrammetric surveying. Keywords: Bank erosion; Overland flow; Wave action; Fluvial entrainment; Water level fluctuation zone; Three Gorges Reservoir

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