Ecohydrology: Insights into Water Dynamics and Ecosystem Functioning

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Ecohydrology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 April 2024 | Viewed by 1114

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Soil and Water Conservation, Beijing Forestry University, Beijing 100083, China
Interests: forest hydrology; soil erosion; water dynamics; hydrological model; field monitoring

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor Assistant
Geothermal and Ecological Geology Research Center, School of Ecology and Environment, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001, China
Interests: surface water and groundwater interaction; groundwater recharge; isotopic hydrology; ecohydrogeology; geothermal genesis

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor Assistant
Geothermal and Ecological Geology Research Center, School of Ecology and Environment, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001, China
Interests: forest hydrology; carbon migration; preferential flow; soil hydrology model; vegetation restoration in the Loess Plateau

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Ecosystems play an important role in the water cycle. Ecosystem processes have undergone large changes driven by human activities (vegetation restoration, deforestation, grazing, and agriculture) and natural disturbances (wildfires, insect infestations, geological hazards, etc.). These changes associated with climate change have affected the characteristics of hydrological processes such as soil infiltration, evapotranspiration, runoff, and groundwater recharge. Hydrological consequences of ecosystem and climate changes are never simple. The variations in the magnitude of consequences depend on the scale, type, and severity of ecosystem disturbances, climate, and watershed properties. Works in hydrology processes affected by underlying surface changes and climate variation are facing greater challenges, which can provide theoretical support for water resources management and vegetation restoration.

This Special Issue of Water is intended to bring together some of the latest research on ecohydrology for insights into water dynamics and ecosystem functioning. We are seeking submissions on a wide range of topics, including ecohydrological components affected by climate change or human activities, hydrology models, surface water–groundwater interactions and groundwater protection, solute transport in hydrological processes, ecosystem functioning, and related areas.

Prof. Dr. Lan Ma
Guest Editor

Prof. Dr. Jianhua Ping
Dr. Xuemei Mei
Guest Editor Assistants

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • hydrological processes
  • ecosystem functioning
  • climate change
  • vegetation restoration
  • human activities

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

29 pages, 15230 KiB  
Article
Predicting the Presence of Groundwater-Influenced Ecosystems in the Northeastern United States with Ensembled Models
by Shawn D. Snyder, Cynthia S. Loftin and Andrew S. Reeve
Water 2023, 15(23), 4035; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15234035 - 21 Nov 2023
Viewed by 688
Abstract
Globally, groundwater-influenced ecosystems (GIEs) are increasingly vulnerable to groundwater extraction and land use practices. Groundwater supports these ecosystems by providing inflow, which can maintain water levels, water temperature, and the chemistry necessary to sustain the biodiversity that they support. Many aquatic systems receive [...] Read more.
Globally, groundwater-influenced ecosystems (GIEs) are increasingly vulnerable to groundwater extraction and land use practices. Groundwater supports these ecosystems by providing inflow, which can maintain water levels, water temperature, and the chemistry necessary to sustain the biodiversity that they support. Many aquatic systems receive groundwater as a portion of baseflow, and in some systems, the connection with groundwater is significant and important to the system’s integrity and persistence. There is a lack of information about where these systems are found and their relationships with environmental conditions in the surrounding landscape. Additionally, groundwater management for human use often does not address maintaining the ecological functions of GIEs. We used correlative distribution modeling methods (GLM, GAM, MaxEnt, Random Forest) to predict landscape-scale habitat suitability for GIEs in two ecologically distinct ecoregions (EPA Level II ecoregions: Atlantic Highlands and Mixed Wood Plains) in the northeastern United States. We evaluated and combined the predictions to create ensemble models for each ecoregion. The accuracy of the ensemble models was 75% in the Atlantic Highlands and 86% in the Mixed Wood Plains. In the Mixed Wood Plains, hydric soil, surface materials, and soil permeability were the best predictors of GIE presence, whereas hydric soil, topographic wetness index, and elevation were the best predictors of GIE presence in the Atlantic Highlands. Approximately 1% of the total land area in each ecoregion was predicted to be suitable for GIEs, highlighting that there likely is a small proportion of the landscape occupied by these systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ecohydrology: Insights into Water Dynamics and Ecosystem Functioning)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop