Special Issue "Selected Papers from the Triestine 2018 Visual Science of Art Conference"

A special issue of Vision (ISSN 2411-5150).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 October 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Daniele Zavagno
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Psychology, University of Milano-Bicocca, Piazza dell’Ateneo Nuovo, 1, 20126 Milano, Italy
Interests: perception; lightness and brightness; perceptual constancies; psychology of art
Dr. Rossana Actis-Grosso
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Psychology, University of Milano-Bicocca, Piazza dell’Ateneo Nuovo, 1, 20126 Milano, Italy
Interests: visual perception; motion perception; cognitive ergonomics; art and cognition

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The Visual Science of Art Conference (VSAC) was first established by Baingio Pinna in Alghero in 2012 as a satellite event of the European Conference on Visual Perception (ECVP). Ever since, just like ECVP, VSAC has changed locations, organizers, and topics, being hosted in different European cities and attracting artists and researchers from all over the world. In 2018, it was held in Trieste, organized by Rossana Actis-Grosso and Daniele Zavagno from the University of Milano-Bicocca. The scope of VSAC is to promote cross-fertilization between the visual arts and vision sciences by setting up a friendly environment where artists, psychologists, vision scientists, art historians, and philosophers can discuss their work, learn from each other, and establish collaborations. The Triestine VSAC was the first to feature an experimental session named Art workshops, in which an artist and a scientist were paired to discuss the artist’s research from two different perspectives. Regular talk and poster sessions were organized by themes, including, but not limited to, aesthetic experiences, artistic techniques, street art and architecture, portraits, and selfies. The conference also hosted three symposiums: Art and expression, dedicated to the memory of Alberto Argenton and to his research on expressivity in the arts; Representation of events and dynamic content in the visual arts, dedicated to the memory of Manfredo Massironi and to his research on the representation of the passage of time in static artworks; and Teaching psychology of art, dedicated to all those who hold such a complex position. This Special Issue will gather some of the insights from VSAC 2018 by collecting papers derived or inspired by the conference in Trieste.

Dr. Daniele Zavagno
Dr. Rossana Actis-Grosso
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Vision is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Individual Differences in Aesthetic Preferences for Multi-Sensorial Stimulation
Vision 2020, 4(1), 6; https://doi.org/10.3390/vision4010006 - 06 Jan 2020
Abstract
The aim of the current project was to investigate aesthetics in multi-sensorial stimulation and to explore individual differences in the process. We measured the aesthetics of interactive objects (IOs) which are three-dimensional objects with electronic components that exhibit an autonomous behaviour when handled, [...] Read more.
The aim of the current project was to investigate aesthetics in multi-sensorial stimulation and to explore individual differences in the process. We measured the aesthetics of interactive objects (IOs) which are three-dimensional objects with electronic components that exhibit an autonomous behaviour when handled, e.g., vibrating, playing a sound, or lighting-up. The Q-sorting procedure of Q-methodology was applied. Data were analysed by following the Qmulti protocol. The results suggested that overall participants preferred IOs that (i) vibrate, (ii) have rough surface texture, and (iii) are round. No particular preference emerged about the size of the IOs. When making an aesthetic judgment, participants paid more attention to the behaviour variable of the IOs than the size, contour or surface texture. In addition, three clusters of participants were identified, suggesting that individual differences existed in the aesthetics of IOs. Without proper consideration of potential individual differences, aesthetic scholars may face the risk of having significant effects masked by individual differences. Only by paying attention to this issue can more meaningful findings be generated to contribute to the field of aesthetics. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Questions for the Psychology of the Artful Mind
Vision 2019, 3(4), 67; https://doi.org/10.3390/vision3040067 - 21 Nov 2019
Abstract
This paper reconstructs the “Arnheim’s puzzle” over the psychology of art. It is argued that the long-established psychological theories of art do not account properly for the observable variability of art, which provide the phenomena of interest whose psychological factors need to be [...] Read more.
This paper reconstructs the “Arnheim’s puzzle” over the psychology of art. It is argued that the long-established psychological theories of art do not account properly for the observable variability of art, which provide the phenomena of interest whose psychological factors need to be discovered. The general purpose principles of such theories, the ensuing selective sample of art phenomena, and assumption of conventional properties of aesthetic experience make the predictions and the findings of the theories unrepresentative of art. From the discussion of examples drawn from contemporary visual arts and the presentation of the debate on the emergence of the cognitive capacities of art in paleoanthropology, a construct is presented on the specificity of the cognitive capacities of art and its anchoring to perception, which solves the puzzle and has implications for research and teaching psychology of art. Full article
Open AccessArticle
The Perceptual and Aesthetic Aspects of the Music-Paintings Congruence
Vision 2019, 3(4), 65; https://doi.org/10.3390/vision3040065 - 20 Nov 2019
Abstract
The purpose of the present study is to investigate the effect of congruence between music and paintings on the aesthetic preference of paintings. Congruence was specified as the similarity in perceived regularity and the complexity of jazz compositions and abstract paintings (the ratings [...] Read more.
The purpose of the present study is to investigate the effect of congruence between music and paintings on the aesthetic preference of paintings. Congruence was specified as the similarity in perceived regularity and the complexity of jazz compositions and abstract paintings (the ratings of regularity and complexity in both sets of stimuli were obtained in the pilot study). In the main experiment, 32 participants rated the aesthetic pleasantness of paintings with congruent, incongruent, and no music background. In addition, they rated the music-paintings matching (how well the music goes with the painting). The results show no effect of congruence on aesthetic pleasantness ratings. The effect on the perceived matching was significant; matching is higher in the congruent compared to the incongruent condition. These findings suggest that congruency has a strong effect on the perceptual aspect of the music-paintings compatibility (visuo-auditory similarity) and no effect on the aesthetic aspect (liking). Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Hughes’s Reverspectives: Radical Uses of Linear Perspective on Non-Coplanar Surfaces
Vision 2019, 3(4), 63; https://doi.org/10.3390/vision3040063 - 18 Nov 2019
Abstract
Two major uses of linear perspective are in planar paintings—the flat canvas is incongruent with the painted 3-D scene—and in forced perspectives, such as theater stages that are concave truncated pyramids, where the physical geometry and the depicted scene are congruent. Patrick Hughes [...] Read more.
Two major uses of linear perspective are in planar paintings—the flat canvas is incongruent with the painted 3-D scene—and in forced perspectives, such as theater stages that are concave truncated pyramids, where the physical geometry and the depicted scene are congruent. Patrick Hughes pioneered a third major art form, the reverse perspective, where the depicted scene opposes the physical geometry. Reverse perspectives comprise solid forms composed of multiple planar surfaces (truncated pyramids and prisms) jutting toward the viewer, thus forming concave spaces between the solids. The solids are painted in reverse perspective: as an example, the left and right trapezoids of a truncated pyramid are painted as rows of houses; the bottom trapezoid is painted as the road between them and the top forms the sky. This elicits the percept of a street receding away, even though it physically juts toward the viewer. Under this illusion, the concave void spaces between the solids are transformed into convex volumes. This depth inversion creates a concomitant motion illusion: when a viewer moves in front of the art piece, the scene appears to move vividly. Two additional contributions by the artist are discussed, in which he combines reverse-perspective parts with forced and planar-perspective parts on the same art piece. The effect is spectacular, creating objects on the same planar surface that move in different directions, thus “breaking” the surface apart, demonstrating the superiority of objects over surfaces. We conclude with a discussion on the value of these art pieces in vision science. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop