Special Issue "Advances in Oomycete Virus Research"

A special issue of Viruses (ISSN 1999-4915). This special issue belongs to the section "Viruses of Plants, Fungi and Protozoa".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 December 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Leticia Botella Sánchez
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Mendel University in Brno, 613 00 Brno-sever-Černá Pole, Czech Republic
Interests: Mycoviruses; RNA; Hypovirulence; Fungal and oomycete pathogens; Endophytes; Forest Pathology
Prof. Dr. Jarkko Hantula
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Natural Resources Institute Finland, Latokartanonkaari 9, FI-00790 Helsinki, Finland
Interests: forest pathogens and mycoviruses
Dr. Eeva Vainio
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke), Natural Resources Unit, Forest Health and Biodiversity, Latokartanonkaari 9, 00790 Helsinki, Finland
Interests: ecology of forest fungi and their viruses

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Oomycetes are heterotrophic saprophytes and parasites of plant and animal hosts. Their morphology and habitat are highly similar to filamentous fungi but phylogenetically they are closer to brown algae and diatoms and belong to the Kingdom Stramenopila (Heterokonta). In general, relatively little is known about virus communities inhabiting oomycetes. Most of the research developed so far has focused on the genus Phytophthora, whose members are significant global plant and forest pathogens causing important economic losses in agriculture, horticulture and forest industry, and they are major threats to natural ecosystems and biodiversity. Nevertheless, a number of new viruses have been also found in other oomycetes with very diverse ecosystems and lifestyles, such as downy mildews (biotrophic plant parasites), water and soilborne oomycetes of the genus Pythium, and Halophytophthora species from estuary ecosystems.

Although the advent of new molecular technologies has brought the opportunity to presume a rich diversity of oomycete viruses, there is still a long way to understand, what is their origin? What is the effect on their hosts? How closely related to diatom viruses they are? How do they transmit? Are there oomycete viruses with DNA genomes? Are they drivers of the evolution of their hosts? Could they be utilized in controlling their pathogenic hosts?

This special issue is a good opportunity to answer some or all these questions and you are welcome to participate.

Dr. Leticia Botella Sánchez
Prof. Dr. Jarkko Hantula
Dr. Eeva Vainio
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Viruses is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Stramenopila (Heterokonta)
  • mycovirus
  • virome
  • dsRNA
  • ssRNA
  • DNA
  • iRNA
  • transcriptomics
  • next generation sequencing
  • phylogenetics
  • evolution
  • sporulation
  • pathogenicity
  • hypovirulence
  • virus transmission
  • virus replication
  • virus diversity
  • soil-borne oomycetes
  • water-borne oomycetes
  • air-borne oomycetes

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Novel Fusari- and Toti-like Viruses, with Probable Different Origins, in the Plant Pathogenic Oomycete Globisporangium ultimum
Viruses 2021, 13(10), 1931; https://doi.org/10.3390/v13101931 - 25 Sep 2021
Viewed by 703
Abstract
To further classify the oomycete viruses that have been discovered in recent years, we investigated virus infection in the plant-parasitic oomycete Globisporangium ultimum in Japan. Double-stranded RNA detection, high-throughput sequencing, and RT-PCR revealed that the G. ultimum isolate UOP226 contained two viruses related [...] Read more.
To further classify the oomycete viruses that have been discovered in recent years, we investigated virus infection in the plant-parasitic oomycete Globisporangium ultimum in Japan. Double-stranded RNA detection, high-throughput sequencing, and RT-PCR revealed that the G. ultimum isolate UOP226 contained two viruses related to fusarivirus and totivirus, named Pythium ultimum RNA virus 1 (PuRV1) and Pythium ultimum RNA virus 2 (PuRV2), respectively. Phylogenetic analysis of the deduced amino acid sequence of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) showed that fusari-like PuRV1 belonged to a different phylogenetic group than Plasmopara viticola lesion-associated fusari virus (PvlaFV) 1–3 from oomycete Plasmopara viticola. Codon usage bias of the PuRV1 RdRp gene was more similar to those of fungi than Globisporangium and Phytophthora, suggesting that the PuRV1 ancestor horizontally transmitted to G. ultimum ancestor from fungi. Phylogenetic analysis of the deduced amino acid sequence of the RdRp of toti-like PuRV2 showed a monophyletic group with the other toti-like oomycete viruses from Globisporangium, Phytophthora, and Pl. viticola. However, the nucleotide sequences of toti-like oomycete viruses were not so homologous, suggesting the possibility of convergent evolution of toti-like oomycete viruses. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Oomycete Virus Research)
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Article
Multiple Viral Infections Detected in Phytophthora condilina by Total and Small RNA Sequencing
Viruses 2021, 13(4), 620; https://doi.org/10.3390/v13040620 - 04 Apr 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1105
Abstract
Marine oomycetes have recently been shown to be concurrently infected by (−)ssRNA viruses of the order Bunyavirales. In this work, even higher virus variability was found in a single isolate of Phytophthora condilina, a recently described member of Phytophthora phylogenetic Clade [...] Read more.
Marine oomycetes have recently been shown to be concurrently infected by (−)ssRNA viruses of the order Bunyavirales. In this work, even higher virus variability was found in a single isolate of Phytophthora condilina, a recently described member of Phytophthora phylogenetic Clade 6a, which was isolated from brackish estuarine waters in southern Portugal. Using total and small RNA-seq the full RdRp of 13 different potential novel bunya-like viruses and two complete toti-like viruses were detected. All these viruses were successfully confirmed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using total RNA as template, but complementarily one of the toti-like and five of the bunya-like viruses were confirmed when dsRNA was purified for RT-PCR. In our study, total RNA-seq was by far more efficient for de novo assembling of the virus sequencing but small RNA-seq showed higher read numbers for most viruses. Two main populations of small RNAs (21 nts and 25 nts-long) were identified, which were in accordance with other Phytophthora species. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study using small RNA sequencing to identify viruses in Phytophthora spp. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Oomycete Virus Research)
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