Zoonotic Diseases: Eco-Epidemiology and Public Health Implications

A special issue of Veterinary Sciences (ISSN 2306-7381).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2023) | Viewed by 11009

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Laboratory of Infectious Diseases, Department of Disease Control, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan
Interests: veterinary medicine; infection immunity
1. Department of Pharmacology and Parasitology, University of Vetrinary Science, Nay Pyi Taw 15013, Myanmar
2. Department of Livestock and Aquaculture Research, Nay Pyi Taw 15013, Myanmar
Interests: parasitology; vectors; zoonoses; epidemiology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Zoonoses are currently regarded as one of the most significant risks to global public health. Approximately 75% of newly emerging infectious diseases affecting humans are of animal origin, and 60% of all human pathogens are zoonotic. These zoonotic infections can be caused by a wide range of pathogenic agents, including viruses, parasites, bacteria, and fungi. Moreover, arthropods are potential vectors of zoonoses due to their abundance and the difficulty of implementing effective population control strategies.

The goal of this Special Issue is to address all aspects of zoonoses and their relationship to ecological and environmental effects, including basic and practical research, control strategies, explanations of new theories or observations, reviews, and so on.

Dr. Shiro Murata
Dr. Saw Bawm
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Veterinary Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2100 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • bacteria
  • ecology
  • epidemiology
  • fungi
  • parasites
  • public health
  • vector control
  • viruses
  • zoonoses

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

18 pages, 1324 KiB  
Article
A One Health Evaluation of the Surveillance Systems on Tick-Borne Diseases in the Netherlands, Spain and Italy
by Aitor Garcia-Vozmediano, Daniele De Meneghi, Hein Sprong, Aránzazu Portillo, José A. Oteo and Laura Tomassone
Vet. Sci. 2022, 9(9), 504; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci9090504 - 14 Sep 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2928
Abstract
To identify ideal elements for the monitoring and prevention of tick-borne diseases (TBD), we analysed the surveillance systems in place in the Netherlands, Spain and Italy. We applied a semi-quantitative evaluation to identify outcomes and assess the degree of One Health implementation. Differences [...] Read more.
To identify ideal elements for the monitoring and prevention of tick-borne diseases (TBD), we analysed the surveillance systems in place in the Netherlands, Spain and Italy. We applied a semi-quantitative evaluation to identify outcomes and assess the degree of One Health implementation. Differences emerged in the surveillance initiatives, as well as the One Health scores. The Dutch surveillance is dominated by a high level of transdisciplinary and trans-sectoral collaboration, enabling communication and data sharing among actors. Different project-based monitoring, research and educational activities are centrally coordinated and the non-scientific community is actively involved. All this yielded measurable health outcomes. In Italy and Spain, TBD surveillance and reporting systems are based on compulsory notification. Law enforcement, alongside dedicated time and availability of economic resources, is fragmented and limited to the most severe health issues. Veterinary and human medicine are the most involved disciplines, with the first prevailing in some contexts. Stakeholders are marginally considered and collaborations limited to local initiatives. Research activities have mostly contributed to gaining knowledge on the distribution of tick vectors and discovery of new pathogens. Although all TBD surveillance plans comply with EU regulations, initiatives characterised by transdisciplinary collaboration may be more effective for the surveillance and prevention of TBD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Zoonotic Diseases: Eco-Epidemiology and Public Health Implications)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

42 pages, 604 KiB  
Review
The Importance of the Slaughterhouse in Surveilling Animal and Public Health: A Systematic Review
by Juan García-Díez, Sónia Saraiva, Dina Moura, Luca Grispoldi, Beniamino Terzo Cenci-Goga and Cristina Saraiva
Vet. Sci. 2023, 10(2), 167; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci10020167 - 20 Feb 2023
Cited by 16 | Viewed by 7096
Abstract
From the point of public health, the objective of the slaughterhouse is to guarantee the safety of meat in which meat inspection represent an essential tool to control animal diseases and guarantee the public health. The slaughterhouse can be used as surveillance center [...] Read more.
From the point of public health, the objective of the slaughterhouse is to guarantee the safety of meat in which meat inspection represent an essential tool to control animal diseases and guarantee the public health. The slaughterhouse can be used as surveillance center for livestock diseases. However, other aspects related with animal and human health, such as epidemiology and disease control in primary production, control of animal welfare on the farm, surveillance of zoonotic agents responsible for food poisoning, as well as surveillance and control of antimicrobial resistance, can be monitored. These controls should not be seen as a last defensive barrier but rather as a complement to the controls carried out on the farm. Regarding the control of diseases in livestock, scientific research is scarce and outdated, not taking advantage of the potential for disease control. Animal welfare in primary production and during transport can be monitored throughout ante-mortem and post-mortem inspection at the slaughterhouse, providing valuable individual data on animal welfare. Surveillance and research regarding antimicrobial resistance (AMR) at slaughterhouses is scarce, mainly in cattle, sheep, and goats. However, most of the zoonotic pathogens are sensitive to the antibiotics studied. Moreover, the prevalence at the slaughterhouse of zoonotic and foodborne agents seems to be low, but a lack of harmonization in terms of control and communication may lead to underestimate its real prevalence. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Zoonotic Diseases: Eco-Epidemiology and Public Health Implications)
Back to TopTop