Special Issue "Inflation, Black Holes and Gravitational Waves"

A special issue of Universe (ISSN 2218-1997).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2019.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Yungui Gong
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, China
Interests: relativistic gravity and cosmology; theoretical research on the nature of gravity; modification of gravity theory; cosmic inflation model; accelerated expansion of the universe; dark energy; gravitational waves
Prof. Dr. Jiliang Jing
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Physics, Key Laboratory of Low Dimensional Quantum Structures and Quantum Control of Ministry of Education, and Synergetic Innovation Center for Quantum Effects and Applications, Hunan Normal University, Changsha, China
Interests: quantum field theory; classical and quantum black holes; holographic superconductivity; relativistic quantum information
Prof. Dr. Anzhong Wang
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Physics Department, Baylor University, One Bear Place #97316, Waco, Texas 76798-7316, USA
Interests: inflationary universe and cosmological perturbations; gravitational waves; dark energy; dark matter; black hole thermodynamics and their formations; general relativity and alternative theories of gravity; quantization of gravity
Prof. Dr. Bin Wang
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1 Center for Gravitation and Cosmology, College of Physical Science and Technology, Yangzhou University, 180 Siwangting Road, Yangzhou 225009, China
2 School of Aeronautics and astronautics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240, China
Interests: general Relativity; black hole physics; cosmology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Inflation not only solves the horizon, flatness, and magnetic monopole problems, but it also provides the seeds for the large-scale structure by the quantum fluctuations of the inflations. The primordial density perturbation and gravitational waves leave imprints on the cosmic microwave background radiation, which can be used to test the inflationary scenario. Furthermore, inflation may be used to probe the effect of quantum gravity. In some inflationary models, large density perturbations at small scales may be generated to produce primordial black holes as the dark matter candidate. At the same time, the large density perturbations might generate secondary gravitational waves through scalar tensor mixing. Primordial black holes and secondary gravitational waves may be detected by the current and future gravitational wave detectors, although binary black holes are currently mainly detected by LIGO/Virgo detectors. Of course, the detections of gravitational waves by LIGO/Virgo scientific collaboration will start a new era of multi-messenger astronomy and open a new window to probing black hole physics and the nature of gravity.

Thus, in the Special Issue, “Inflation, Black Holes and Gravitational Waves”, we would like to focus on inflationary models, quantum gravity effects in inflationary observables, the production of primordial black hole dark matter and secondary gravitational waves, black hole physics, gravitational waves in modified gravity and the constraints on modified gravity by gravitational waves, gravitational wave cosmology, and gravitational wave physics.

It is our great pleasure to serve as the Guest Editors of this Special Issue, and we invite our colleagues to submit their works to this Special Issue. In the following, we give a series of topics which we hope our colleagues will be greatly interested in:

  1. Inflationary models and quantum gravity effects in inflationary observables;
  2. The production of primordial black hole dark matter and secondary gravitational waves;
  3. Gravitational waves in modified gravity and the constraints on modified gravity by gravitational waves;
  4. Gravitational waves as standard sirens to measure the cosmological parameters and study cosmology;
  5. Gravitational wave lensing;
  6. Gravitational wave astronomy.

Prof. Dr. Yungui Gong
Prof. Dr. Jiliang Jing
Prof. Dr. Anzhong Wang
Prof. Dr. Bin Wang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Universe is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • inflation
  • black holes
  • primordial black hole dark matter
  • quantum gravity effects
  • modified gravity
  • gravitational waves
  • gravitational wave lensing
  • cosmological parameters

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Gauss–Bonnet Inflation and the String Swampland
Universe 2019, 5(9), 200; https://doi.org/10.3390/universe5090200 - 15 Sep 2019
Cited by 16
Abstract
The swampland criteria are generically in tension with single-field slow-roll inflation because the first swampland criterion requires small tensor-to-scalar ratio while the second swampland criterion requires either large tensor-to-scalar ratio or large scalar spectral tilt. The challenge to single-field slow-roll inflation imposed by [...] Read more.
The swampland criteria are generically in tension with single-field slow-roll inflation because the first swampland criterion requires small tensor-to-scalar ratio while the second swampland criterion requires either large tensor-to-scalar ratio or large scalar spectral tilt. The challenge to single-field slow-roll inflation imposed by the swampland criteria can be avoided by modifying the relationship between the tensor-to-scalar ratio and the slow-roll parameter. We show that the Gauss–Bonnet inflation with the coupling function inversely proportional to the potential overcomes the challenge by adding a constant factor in the relationship between the tensor-to-scalar ratio and the slow-roll parameter. For the Gauss–Bonnet inflation, while the swampland criteria are satisfied, the slow-roll conditions are also fulfilled, so the scalar spectral tilt and the tensor-to-scalar ratio are consistent with the observations. We use the potentials for chaotic inflation and the E-model as examples to show that the models pass all the constraints. The Gauss–Bonnet coupling seems a way out of the swampland issue for single-field inflationary models. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inflation, Black Holes and Gravitational Waves)
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