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Sustainable Planning and Management of Urban Water Systems

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Urban and Rural Development".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 August 2024 | Viewed by 10407

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Hydraulic Engineering Area, IGA Research Group, Higher Polytechnic School of Ávila, University of Salamanca, Avda. Hornos Caleros 50, 05003 Ávila, Spain
Interests: sustainability; water resources management; rivers; civil engineering; environmental science; hydrology; environmental engineering; hydraulics; groundwater; surface hydrology; water resources; climatology; hydrogeology; drought; water science; bayesian analysis; uncertainty; decision support systems
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Hydraulic Engineering Area, Higher Polytechnic School of Ávila, University of Salamanca, Avda. Hornos Caleros 50, 05003 Ávila, Spain
Interests: urban water systems; water balance; hydraulic engineering; river hydraulic engineering; hydrological modelling; flood modelling; water sustainability

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Hydraulic Engineering Area, IGA Research Group. Higher Polytechnic School of Ávila, University of Salamanca, Avda. Hornos Caleros 50, 05003 Ávila, Spain
Interests: water sustainability; water resource management; drought; hydrological modelling; bayesian causality analysis; flood modelling; river hydraulic engineering
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Sustainability in the field of hydraulic engineering, especially in the field of sustainable urban water systems, is an important and unexplored topic, and reaching the circularity of those systems is a challenge nowadays. This would assure the equilibrium between modernity in the engineering aspect and safety in the environmental aspect. To achieve, there must be a necessary and major advance in different fields, such as new developments based on smart technologies (digitalization), new materials, innovative and integrated methodologies, analytical approaches to assure the guarantee of domestic water supply, innovative hydrological/hydraulic analytical processes, landscaping and architectural developments, urban planning and management, as well as pioneering engineering designs, among others. Manuscripts that cover these fields and related topics are welcomed for this Special Issue (SI) entitled “Sustainable Planning and Management of Urban Water Systems”. The submitted manuscripts will pass through a rigorous and fair review process that assures the highest quality of contributions to this international SI. The existing related literature is largely focused on the engineering aspect of this field; however, many more dimensions must be analyzed and shared with the international community. We strongly encourage the international community of related researchers, engineers, scientists, practitioners, etc., to be part of this essential initiative.

Dr. José-Luis Molina
Dr. Fernando Espejo
Dr. Santiago Zazo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • urban water systems
  • sustainability
  • circularity
  • innovation
  • integration
  • digitalization

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

20 pages, 6596 KiB  
Article
Rapid Urbanization in Ethiopia: Lakes as Drivers and Its Implication for the Management of Common Pool Resources
by Aklilu Fikresilassie Kabiso, Eoin O’Neill, Finbarr Brereton and Wondimu Abeje
Sustainability 2022, 14(19), 12788; https://doi.org/10.3390/su141912788 - 7 Oct 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 5467
Abstract
Recent history has been marked by a shift from rural to urban living. Studies show that urbanization is most prevalent at coastal areas and river basins and these are the locations where most megacities are established. However, in the African context, there is [...] Read more.
Recent history has been marked by a shift from rural to urban living. Studies show that urbanization is most prevalent at coastal areas and river basins and these are the locations where most megacities are established. However, in the African context, there is a deficit of research in this area. The focus of studies in the ‘urban’ field show the expansion of cities towards waterbodies but with little or no attention to the implications of this expansion—‘the rural to urban shift’—particularly as they concern lakes as commons in a rapidly urbanizing world, such as African countries and the Global South. Thus, using the case of lakes in Ethiopia, this study explores the trend of urbanization vis-à-vis lakes and its implications for the management of lakes, where historically the Ethiopian urban system has been characterized by settlements on mountain areas as strategic places located far from water bodies, particularly lakes. Using secondary data on population of urban centers and distribution of lakes in Ethiopia, this paper finds that urban centers that are located adjacent to lakes have been growing faster than those cities and towns that are not. The study argues that lakes are an attraction factor for urbanization. Moreover, rapid urban expansion around lakes implies that, in the future, the management of lakes (as common pool resources) critically depends on how urban centers are planned and managed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Planning and Management of Urban Water Systems)
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18 pages, 3600 KiB  
Article
Improving the Sustainability of Urban Water Management through Innovative Groundwater Recharge System (GRS)
by Abedin Mohammad-Hosseinpour and José-Luis Molina
Sustainability 2022, 14(10), 5990; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14105990 - 15 May 2022
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 3880
Abstract
Negative impacts of groundwater overuse have always been one of the problems of modern cities in arid and semi-arid regions; rapid population growth and climate change have also exacerbated these problems in many areas. One of the best approaches to deal with the [...] Read more.
Negative impacts of groundwater overuse have always been one of the problems of modern cities in arid and semi-arid regions; rapid population growth and climate change have also exacerbated these problems in many areas. One of the best approaches to deal with the impacts of these phenomena (soil subsidence, decline in groundwater quality, and seawater intrusion) is to artificially recharge water into aquifers and raise the groundwater level. In this paper, an innovative solution called Groundwater Recharge Systems (GRS) is proposed with high efficiency, low cost, and fast implementation capability to address these problems. The proposed solution also has the capability of being constructed in urban environments without the need to allocate any spacious land or the need to use any sophisticated technologies. The study of implementing the proposed groundwater recharge systems in the study area showed that the performance of this system, even in worst-case scenarios, will be very significant even considering climate change impacts such as seawater level rise and decline in precipitation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Planning and Management of Urban Water Systems)
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