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Special Issue "Natural Stone and Architectural Heritage"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainability of Culture and Heritage".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 June 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Lola Pereira

Departmentt of Geology, University of Salamanca, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Interests: natural stones; petrology; geochemistry; architectonic heritage
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Lidia Catarino

Department of Earth Sciences, University of Coimbra, Portugal
Website | E-Mail
Interests: architectonic heritage; stone degradation; stone wastes; natural raw materials
Guest Editor
Dr. Giovanna Antonella Dino

Department of Earth Sciences, University of Torino, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: dimension stone; heritage stones; quarrying and working activities; geoheritage

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The working group on Heritage Stones has been growing in the last ten years and it has become obvious that a Special Issue presenting new stones that have been used in the construction of the architectural heritage is demanded. Heritage Stones are those stones that have special significance in human culture. Examples include some very important stones that have been either neglected because they are no longer extracted, or stones that have great significance in commercial terms, but knowledge of their national and/or international heritage has not been well documented.

The aim of this issue is to spread awareness of architectural heritage around the world, and the natural stones that have been used in its construction. Also the need to preserve historical quarries that once provided the source of such stones. Historical quarries are linked to regional culture and traditions. Today very often, due to improved transportation and infrastructure, or globalization that leads to imports of exotic ornamental stones, they lie idle. Because the specific technical and aesthetical characteristics of heritage stones, that have lasted for centuries, these historical quarries should be preserved to be able to use the stone for proper restoration of monuments and historical buildings to avoid negative actions that can be observed in many places in the restoration of buildings, some times part of World Heritage sites.

This is why we invite you to submit your research related to natural stones and heritage, to build an exciting and very interesting Special Issue that will serve as awareness about the importance of natural stones in the architectural heritage.

Prof. Dr. Dolores Pereira
Prof. Dr. Lidia Catarino
Dr. Giovanna Antonella Dino
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Serpentinite from Moeche (Galicia, North Western Spain). A Stone Used for Centuries in the Construction of the Architectural Heritage of the Region
Sustainability 2019, 11(9), 2700; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11092700
Received: 1 April 2019 / Revised: 9 May 2019 / Accepted: 10 May 2019 / Published: 12 May 2019
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Abstract
Serpentinites are characterized by highly variable mineralogical, physical, and mechanical properties. Serpentinites from Moeche (North Western Spain) have been studied to establish their mineralogical, petrographic, and textural characteristics, as well as their physical and mechanical parameters and the factors influencing rock failure, to [...] Read more.
Serpentinites are characterized by highly variable mineralogical, physical, and mechanical properties. Serpentinites from Moeche (North Western Spain) have been studied to establish their mineralogical, petrographic, and textural characteristics, as well as their physical and mechanical parameters and the factors influencing rock failure, to evaluate the possible use of these rocks either for new construction or for conservation-restoration of the architectonic heritage of the region. In this paper, we highlight the importance of a detailed mineralogical and petrographic characterization in the fracture zones, which will determine the viability of quarrying the stone. A strong correlation between the petrographic features and the uniaxial compression strength values has been observed. The most important aspects were found to be the rock texture, the mineralogical composition of the fracture area and foliation, although mineralogy was also found to be involved (% of carbonates) in the strength of the stone. An important preliminary result of the study was the low asbestos content of these serpentinites, which will help in the potential re-opening of the quarries. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Stone and Architectural Heritage)
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Open AccessArticle
Seismic Performance of Ancient Masonry Structures in Korea Rediscovered in 2016 M 5.8 Gyeongju Earthquake
Sustainability 2019, 11(6), 1565; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11061565
Received: 30 January 2019 / Revised: 6 March 2019 / Accepted: 6 March 2019 / Published: 14 March 2019
PDF Full-text (3775 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The Gyeongju Historic Areas, which include the millennium-old capital of the Silla Kingdom, are located in the region most frequently affected by seismic events in the Korean peninsula. Despite the numerous earthquakes documented, most of the stone architectural heritage has retained their original [...] Read more.
The Gyeongju Historic Areas, which include the millennium-old capital of the Silla Kingdom, are located in the region most frequently affected by seismic events in the Korean peninsula. Despite the numerous earthquakes documented, most of the stone architectural heritage has retained their original forms. This study systematically reviews and categorises studies dealing with the seismic risk assessment of the architectural heritage of the historic areas. It applies research methodologies, such as the evaluation of the engineering characteristics of subsoil in architectural heritage sites, site-specific analysis of the ground motions in response to earthquake scenarios, geographic information system (GIS)-based seismic microzonation according to the geotechnical engineering parameters, reliability assessment of dynamic centrifuge model testing for stone masonry structures and evaluation of seismic behaviour of architectural heritage. The M 5.8 earthquake that hit Gyeongju on September 12, 2016 is analysed from an engineering point of view and the resulting damage to the stone architectural heritage is reported. The study focuses on Cheomseongdae, an astronomical observatory in Gyeongju, whose structural engineering received considerable attention since its seismic resistance was reported after the last earthquake. Dynamic centrifuge model tests applying the Gyeongju Earthquake motions are performed to prove that it is not a coincidence that Cheomseongdae, a masonry structure composed of nearly 400 stone members, survived numerous seismic events for over 1300 years. The structural characteristics of Cheomseongdae, such as the well-compacted filler materials in its lower part, rough inside wall in contrast to the smooth exterior, intersecting stone beams and interlocking headstones are proven to contribute to its overall seismic performance, demonstrating outstanding seismic design technology. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Stone and Architectural Heritage)
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