Special Issue "Heritage Urbanism—Urban Heritage and Planning and Design"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Tourism, Culture, and Heritage".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Krister Olsson
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Conservation, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden
Interests: heritage management; planning processes; place branding/marketing; citizen participation; urban planning and design
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Tigran Haas
Website
Guest Editor
KTH—Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden
Interests: tendencies in urbanism; urban transformations; placemaking; sustainable housing; human behavior

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Urban heritage is increasingly expected to contribute to urban development, not least in cities that have experienced a harsh economic, social and spatial structural change. To address these large-scale structural challenges a number of ideals have influenced the practice of urban planning and design (e.g., New Urbanism, Re-Urbanism). A stimulating question lies in the possibility of using urban heritage and planning and design measures—what we call Heritage Urbanism—to revive cities, towns and communities. This question will be discussed in four articles following an editorial introduction. The articles will scrutinize the question from empirical viewpoints/cases, but in particular from different theoretical perspectives: Heritage management; place branding/marketing; urban design; and infrastructure development. Moreover, based in the various theoretical perspectives, the articles will address the issue of citizen input to urban heritage and urban development management. We intend to invite several authors to contribute to this Special Issue.

Dr. Krister Olsson
Dr. Tigran Haas
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Place Branding/Marketing
  • Heritage Management
  • Urban Design
  • Infrastructure development

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Open AccessArticle
Urban Heritage as Ethos in Resource-Based Small-Scale Property Management
Sustainability 2019, 11(19), 5354; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11195354 - 27 Sep 2019
Abstract
This study puts urban heritage in the setting of property owners’ small-scale and resource-based management of ordinary old buildings. This phenomenon indicates a need not only to reconceptualize urban heritage in its actual complex web of negotiations over constraints of the regulation (urban [...] Read more.
This study puts urban heritage in the setting of property owners’ small-scale and resource-based management of ordinary old buildings. This phenomenon indicates a need not only to reconceptualize urban heritage in its actual complex web of negotiations over constraints of the regulation (urban planning, including preservation) and economy (the real estate market) but also to pay attention to the emergence of a new ethos. The case concerns a Swedish second-city context and the specific moment in time: When the 1990s recession had disarmed the real estate market. Based upon ethnographic fieldwork, this study used an assemblage perspective to allow for a following of entanglements of material and matter. The study sheds light upon the emergence of a small-scale and resource-based management in the midst of managerially defined cycles of investment. Important for the output was 1) the set-up of a network of skilled craftsmen, antiquarians, and entrepreneurs ‘of the right mindset that enabled for the authentic material result but that also helped navigate regulation and financial parties, 2) the “alternative market for reverential maintenance and repair” that guaranteed the appropriate supply of materials, products, and skills that differed from the mainstream construction market. For the means of understanding the ethos involved, the study introduced the notion of “factual life-span of buildings”. The overall aim of this article was to contribute to research on heritage urbanism by adding a resource management perspective that focusses on the entanglements of material and matter. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Heritage Urbanism—Urban Heritage and Planning and Design)
Open AccessArticle
Joining Historic Cities to the Global World: Feasibility or Fantasy?
Sustainability 2019, 11(9), 2662; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11092662 - 09 May 2019
Cited by 6
Abstract
Given the globalisation and free movement of capital and people, global cities compete with others not only as tourist destinations but also for the attraction of investors, skilled labour and well-educated citizens. In this research, the image of the historic city of Florence [...] Read more.
Given the globalisation and free movement of capital and people, global cities compete with others not only as tourist destinations but also for the attraction of investors, skilled labour and well-educated citizens. In this research, the image of the historic city of Florence is investigated from the perspective of tourists and residents to assess the feasibility of joining historic cities to the global world. The sample size included 384 people who were randomly selected in the historic centre of Florence and answered the research questionnaire. The data was then analysed by descriptive statistics and logistic regression test. The findings show that although appropriate environmental qualities have made Florence highly successful in attracting tourists, what can promote the sustainability level of this historic city in the globalisation era is the organisation of urban planning in order to gain a part of global economic and human capital by creating the precise and unique image of the city. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Heritage Urbanism—Urban Heritage and Planning and Design)
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Open AccessArticle
Nodes and Networks: The Generative Role of Cultural Heritage for Urban Revival in Kikinda
Sustainability 2019, 11(9), 2509; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11092509 - 30 Apr 2019
Cited by 3
Abstract
Using heritage as a cultural artifact in city development is not new, but little has been explored about how urban heritage can be utilized as new generative value and a new planning instrument for the revival of cities. The purpose of this paper [...] Read more.
Using heritage as a cultural artifact in city development is not new, but little has been explored about how urban heritage can be utilized as new generative value and a new planning instrument for the revival of cities. The purpose of this paper is to show the creative and the generative use of urban heritage, both for the extension of cultural and tourist offer of the city and for the improvement of the quality of life in physical, social and economic terms for the community. The case study method was used for the adaptive reuse of projects for heritage buildings and urban revival in Kikinda. We argue that urban heritage has to be used, bearing in mind its spatial, economic and social sustainability aspects, and become a generator of urban revival. We go beyond recognition of the value of heritage as a cultural artifact that should solely be preserved and used as a static element in urban development, and view it more as a dynamic asset for city revival processes. We found that for the heritage nodes to be utilized as the new generative value for the revival of cities, they have to be perceived from the network perspective, thus influencing the urban environment in a sustainable way. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Heritage Urbanism—Urban Heritage and Planning and Design)
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Open AccessArticle
Sustainability of Historical Heritage: The Conservation of the Xi’an City Wall
Sustainability 2019, 11(3), 740; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11030740 - 31 Jan 2019
Cited by 6
Abstract
This paper studies the Xi’an City Wall (XCW) as a sustainable historical heritage. Based on the conservation process of XCW, the study is focused on four experiences that drive its sustainable development. First, the opening of gates through XCW helped to maximize its [...] Read more.
This paper studies the Xi’an City Wall (XCW) as a sustainable historical heritage. Based on the conservation process of XCW, the study is focused on four experiences that drive its sustainable development. First, the opening of gates through XCW helped to maximize its preservation while meeting the needs for urban transportation. Second, transforming XCW into an urban public space facilitated the gradual building of its camp into a city-dominated landscape. Furthermore, integrating social activities into the public space carried by XCW brought people closer to the heritage. Moreover, the use of XCW as the benchmark for the modern Xi’an urban space pattern ensured the continuation of its historical coordinates on the basis. In order to maintain the sustainability of XCW, a future sustainable development plan is put forward according to the Historic Urban Landscape (HUL) approach proposed by UNESCO. This plan has a generalization guiding significance for the future policy formulation of XCW. Findings from this study serve as a reference for the planning and conservation of historical heritage in cities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Heritage Urbanism—Urban Heritage and Planning and Design)
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Open AccessOpinion
Heritage Urbanism
Sustainability 2019, 11(9), 2669; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11092669 - 10 May 2019
Cited by 4
Abstract
Heritage urbanism considers the revitalization and enhancement of cultural heritage in spatial, urban, and landscape contexts, and it explores models for its inclusion in contemporary life. The main research question is whether it is possible, based on a number of case studies, to [...] Read more.
Heritage urbanism considers the revitalization and enhancement of cultural heritage in spatial, urban, and landscape contexts, and it explores models for its inclusion in contemporary life. The main research question is whether it is possible, based on a number of case studies, to recognize models of the future use of heritage and interpret them as general models that may be applied to numerous specific cases. In doing so, the experience of the past becomes relevant and applicable to contemporary heritage revitalization and enhancement projects. The goal of the paper is to present Heritage Urbanism approach as an integral view of heritage in line with the ideas of sustainable development. Heritage is not viewed as isolated objects but rather as part of the immediate and wider environment. The context/environment affects heritage and its revival, while finding new uses and repurposing heritage has a stimulating effect on the environment and its development. The effects of this interaction can make heritage recognisable and can stimulate its sustainability. The survival and future of heritage are linked to urban and spatial planning, which takes into account the integrity of space and the cultural heritage in it. Urban and spatial planning methods are used. When these methods are enriched by the heritage urbanism approach, the result is the creation of specific methods that supplement well-known methods. In this context, cultural heritage can be used for place branding, infrastructure development, as a crucial element of urban design, or in other ways that aim to achieve an integral view of cultural heritage. The integral view requires the concerted action of different fields, such as regional development, the economy, tourism, transportation, and infrastructure. A fragmented and selective approach does not yield results. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Heritage Urbanism—Urban Heritage and Planning and Design)
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