Special Issue "Challenges in Environmental Geology and Hydrology"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Resources and Sustainable Utilization".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Zoran Nakić
Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of mining, geology and petroleum engineering, University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia
Interests: water management; hydrogeochemistry; natural background values; groundwater modeling; environmental monitoring; applied statistics
Dr. Alexandra Gemitzi
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Democritus University of Thrace, Xanthi, Greece
Interests: environmental modeling; remote sensing; groundwater–surface water interactions; GIS; climate change
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Geological settings and earth processes influence the occurrence of natural hazards like landslides, floods, or droughts, which have numerous impacts on humans and their environments. At the same time, human activities and dramatic population growth significantly increase the impact of climate and land use change on the physical environment, causing the deterioration of human health and ecosystem services, the pollution of water, soil, and air, the imbalance of biogeochemical cycles, and enormous waste production. In addition, the overexploitation of mineral resources deteriorates huge areas of land, produces enormous mine waste, and pollutes sensitive natural resources.

Over the last several decades, vulnerable areas such as fertile soils around rivers prone to flooding or coasts vulnerable to tropical cyclones were regularly affected by extreme events, having large socio-economic and environmental impacts affecting many sectors. These multi-faceted impacts occur both in arid and semi-arid regions, but also in regions where water availability has never before been a major concern. In addition, many water systems used for water supply and irrigation are already under substantial pressure from overexploitation or pollution, and the demand for water resources is increasing remarkably.

Improved knowledge on how to identify and mitigate environmental problems caused by natural hazards and humans and how to help land-use planners and policy makers to balance needs for land and resources with their availability is pivotal to achieve sustainable development. Although substantial scientific progress has been made over the last several decades on natural hazards preparedness, monitoring and forecasting, the environmental impact assessment of mining and mineral processing, and water resources management and planning under the changing climate, there are still research gaps in this area that need to be tackled. This Special Issue aims to contribute to advancing the scientific knowledge on the assessment of the environmental and socio-economic impacts of natural and anthropogenic hazards on soil and water. In particular, this Special Issue will focus on:

  • Environmental and socio-economic impacts triggered by natural or anthropogenic hazards at different scales, taking into account economic, political, and social factors;
  • Impact monitoring using ground and/or remotely sensed techniques;
  • Impact of mining and mineral processing on environment and human health;
  • Pollutant leaching through soil and unsaturated zone from different land-uses in both time and space, taking into account uncertainty in model prediction;
  • Integrated decision-making and management modelling systems for sustainable water management strategies;
  • Geological aspects of waste management; and
  • Characterization and remediation of contaminated soil and groundwater.

Prof. Zoran Nakić
Dr. Alexandra Gemitzi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Environmental geology
  • Environmental sustainability
  • Groundwater
  • Soil and unsaturated zone
  • Natural hazards
  • Anthropogenic impacts
  • Environmental risk assessment
  • Socio-economic aspects of soil and water management
  • Integrated decision making and management modelling systems
  • Waste management
  • Pollution leaching
  • Uncertainty
  • Remediation

Published Papers

This special issue is now open for submission, see below for planned papers.

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Environmental impacts of climatic cycles and oscillations on the precipitation of the Carpathian-Basin
Authors: Csaba Ilyés; Péter Szűcs; Endre Turai; László Szarka
Affiliation: Institute of Environmental Management, Faculty of Earth Science and Engineering, University of Miskolc; MTA-ME Geoengineering Research Group; Institute of Geophysics and Geoinformatics, Faculty of Earth Science and Engineering, University of Miskolc
Abstract: Several climatic anomalies and teleconnections can be found on Earth, all of them affecting most part of the planet’s weather. In our work, we tried to determine and quantify the connections between these climatic cycles and precipitation data from across Hungary. With the advanced mathematical methods of cross correlation and cross spectral analysis, the connections of the climatic patterns and oscillations with the precipitation of different areas have been defined. We were able to use the 1950-2010 time frame in order to detect the effects of certain climatic patterns, such as the ENSO, Arctic Oscillation, North Atlantic Oscillation, Pacific/North American teleconnection pattern and the Atlantic Multidecade Oscillation on the rainfall events of the Carpathian Basin. Data from four different precipitation measurement points and oscillation indexes from several databases were used for this complex analysis. The results can help understand the patterns and regularities of the precipitation, the major source of groundwater recharge, thus being a handful tool for future groundwater management.

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