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Special Issue "Sustainable and Community-Based Approaches for the Reduction of Landslide Impacts"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Geography and Sustainability".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2020) | Viewed by 5446

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Loredana Antronico
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Italian National Research Council, Research Institute for Geo-Hydrological Protection, 87036 Rende, CS, Italy
Interests: landslide risk assessment, landslide monitoring, geo-hydrological risk perception and communication; natural hazards and disaster risk reduction
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Francesco De Pascale
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Italian National Research Council, Research Institute for Geo-Hydrological Protection, 87036 Rende (CS), Italy
Interests: disaster studies; human geography; geoethics; risk perception and communication
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Landslide phenomena can have significant impacts on people’s life, health, and property. These impacts are expected to increase in particular as a result of climate change and population expansion in high-risk areas. The literature and studies on landslide impact show that this natural hazard can be analyzed from a multidisciplinary perspective: Social and economic impact, “natural environment” impact, and psychological and physical impact. It this clear from this framework that the reduction of the impact of landslides can be addressed by adopting a number of appropriate strategies and methodologies. Engineering works (stabilization measures), monitoring and warning systems, urban planning strategies, environmental management, and community preparedness are but some examples. However, it is important that the methodologies and approaches used be sustainable and community-based, that is, integrated approaches that take into account the social, cultural, political, and economic dynamics of the potentially affected territory. ‘Community-based’ means working with communities to identify and provide solutions to landslide vulnerability together. This approach leads governments and local policy-makers to develop new practices and policies for reducing landslide risk. Moreover, the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development recognizes and reaffirms the interrelationship between disaster risk reduction and sustainable development, such as promoting education for sustainability, upgrading education facilities, ensuring health, and building resilient infrastructure.

This Special Issue wants to address the sustainable and community-based approaches to enhancing strategies for avoiding or reducing landslide impact on people, private and public building, lifelines, and the natural environment. Consequently, this Special Issue is of interest to a broad range of scientists and humanists: Hydrologists, geologists, practitioners, civil and geotechnical engineers, environmental managers, policy makers, geographers, anthropologists, sociologists, and psychologists.

Dr. Loredana Antronico
Dr. Francesco De Pascale
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • landslide hazard and risk assessment
  • landslide risk reduction
  • climate change
  • community-based approach
  • disaster risk management
  • emergency psychology
  • geo-education
  • sustainability assessment
  • risk perception and communication
  • social vulnerability
  • territorial resilience
  • urban planning

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Climate Change and Social Perception: A Case Study in Southern Italy
Sustainability 2020, 12(17), 6985; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12176985 - 27 Aug 2020
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2951
Abstract
The consequences of climate change can involve various ambits and be very severe. For this reason, the social perception of climate change is a fundamental issue since it can influence the decisions of the policymakers, by encouraging or discouraging political, economic and social [...] Read more.
The consequences of climate change can involve various ambits and be very severe. For this reason, the social perception of climate change is a fundamental issue since it can influence the decisions of the policymakers, by encouraging or discouraging political, economic and social actions. In this paper, a sample of 300 interviews, collected through a standardized questionnaire and carried out among two municipalities located in southern Italy, was exploited to investigate the perception of climate change. Specific issues, regarding perceptions about climate change, concerns about its impacts, level of information, behavior and actions, exposure to extreme natural events and trust, were addressed to give answers to the research questions: (i) Is climate change perceived by the population? (ii) What is the degree of the community resilience to extreme natural events and climate change? As the main findings, this survey highlighted that the spatio-temporal dimension affects population perception, suggesting that some issues, such as correct behavior towards the geosphere, the sustainability of anthropization processes, community resilience and disaster risk reduction policies, can be very central and useful to mitigate the effects of climate change in population and society. Moreover, climate change perception varies in relation to contextual factors, including media communication, socio-demographic characteristics of respondents, knowledge and education, economic and institutional factors, personal values and, finally, psychological factors and experience. Full article
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Article
Inventory, Distribution and Geometric Characteristics of Landslides in Baoshan City, Yunnan Province, China
Sustainability 2020, 12(6), 2433; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12062433 - 20 Mar 2020
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 1788
Abstract
Inventorying landslides in mountainous areas is of great importance for prevention of geologic hazards. This study aimed to establish a detailed landslide inventory of Baoshan City, Yunnan Province, China, based on a large set of high-resolution satellite images from Google Earth. The landslides [...] Read more.
Inventorying landslides in mountainous areas is of great importance for prevention of geologic hazards. This study aimed to establish a detailed landslide inventory of Baoshan City, Yunnan Province, China, based on a large set of high-resolution satellite images from Google Earth. The landslides of this region were divided into two groups, i.e., recent landslides and old landslides. The spatial distribution and geometric characteristics of the two kinds of landslides were analyzed, respectively. Results show that 2427 landslides are present in the study area, including 2144 recent landslides and 283 old landslides with a total area of 7.2 km2 and 97.6 km2, respectively. The recent landslides occurred primarily at steep slopes with higher elevation, while old landslides took place at gentle terrains. For the slope position, most landslides, whether old or recent, cluster near ridges. The lower boundary of the recent landslides is far away from the valley, while the accumulation area of the old landslide is closer to the valley. The H/L (height to length) ratios are basically the same for all landslides, ranging from 0.2 to 0.5. Old landslides have larger mobility, as their travel distances are longer than recent landslides at the same height. The results would be helpful for further understanding the development and spatial distribution of the landslides in Southwest China, and also provide essential support for the subsequent landslide susceptibility mapping and geologic hazard assessment in this area. Full article
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