Athletic Training

A special issue of Sports (ISSN 2075-4663).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2018) | Viewed by 21679

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Athletic Training, Daemen College, 4380 Main Street, Amherst, NY 14226, USA
Interests: clinical biomechanics; clinical movement screen; lower extremity injury prevention

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Athletic Training embodies a safer approach to work, life, and sport. In light of the emphasis on evidence-based practice, athletic training clinicians are seeking good research to support their clinical practice in creating a safe environment and reducing injury risk. There are three inherent parts of decreasing injury risk: 1) understanding injury epidemiology, 2) determining relevant screening tools, and 3) designing injury prevention interventions. All of these areas have received attention in the literature; however, there is a lack of consistency of injury definitions. Further, additional information is needed to determine and document the effectiveness of clinical screeing tools in assessing injury risk. Injury prevention intervention programs that effectively mitigate risk across multiple populations also need further study. The aim of this Special Issue is to build on the current literature to provide clinicians with strong evidence to support risk assessment, safe environments, and injury prevention.

Dr. Nicole Chimera
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sports is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Injury epidemiology
  • Participation risk
  • Clinical screening tools
  • Injury prevention
  • Physical activity

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

340 KiB  
Article
Changes in Self-Reported Concussion History after Administration of a Novel Concussion History Questionnaire in Collegiate Recreational Student-Athletes
by Adam Copp, Monica R. Lininger and Meghan Warren
Sports 2017, 5(4), 95; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports5040095 - 17 Dec 2017
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 4212
Abstract
Research has shown that exposure to a concussion definition (CD) increases self-reported concussion history (SRCH) immediately, however, no research has been performed that examines the effects of exposure to a CD on SRCH over time. Collegiate recreational student-athletes (RSAs) have limited access to [...] Read more.
Research has shown that exposure to a concussion definition (CD) increases self-reported concussion history (SRCH) immediately, however, no research has been performed that examines the effects of exposure to a CD on SRCH over time. Collegiate recreational student-athletes (RSAs) have limited access to monitoring and supervision by medical staff. As such, recognition of concussion symptoms and need for medical management oftentimes falls upon the RSA. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of a novel questionnaire on the SRCH of RSAs. A two-part questionnaire was sent to RSAs participating is sports with a greater than average risk of concussion at a university in Arizona. Data from 171 RSAs were analyzed to assess the change in RSAs’ suspected concussion estimates pre- and post-exposure to a CD and concussion symptom worksheet, as well as over the short-term (2.5 months). Approximately one-third of RSAs reported an increase in suspected concussion estimates immediately following exposure to the questionnaire, but the change was not maintained over the short-term. The results suggest that a single exposure to a CD is ineffective at increasing short-term SRCH estimates. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Athletic Training)
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1859 KiB  
Article
Balance Performance as Observed by Center-of-Pressure Parameter Characteristics in Male Soccer Athletes and Non-Athletes
by Lara A. Thompson, Mehdi Badache, Steven Cale, Lonika Behera and Nian Zhang
Sports 2017, 5(4), 86; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports5040086 - 8 Nov 2017
Cited by 40 | Viewed by 6445
Abstract
Static balance has a relevant influence on athletic performance as well as on reducing the risk of injury. The main goal of this study was to assess soccer athlete versus non-athlete balance performance via displacement and velocity parameters extracted from the center-of-pressure (COP) [...] Read more.
Static balance has a relevant influence on athletic performance as well as on reducing the risk of injury. The main goal of this study was to assess soccer athlete versus non-athlete balance performance via displacement and velocity parameters extracted from the center-of-pressure (COP) position time series. In order to accomplish our goal, we investigated standing balance in two male groups with unimpaired balance: non-athletes (n = 12) and collegiate varsity soccer athletes (n = 12). In order to make the standing balancing task more or less difficult, we altered participant base-of-support, as well as vision, yielding static (quiet stance) test conditions increasing in difficulty. From the COP position time series, displacement and velocity parameters were computed and plotted as a function of increasing test condition difficulty level. COP parameters showed steeper increases with increased test difficulty in non-athletes compared to athletes; this demonstrated athletes’ better ability to control their balance. We concluded that balance performance could be characterized via COP displacement and velocity response curves. This study lends new insights into how COP parameters can be utilized to determine and characterize improvements in balance between un-impaired subject populations (athletes versus non-athletes). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Athletic Training)
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216 KiB  
Article
Health Care as a Team Sport?—Studying Athletics to Improve Interprofessional Collaboration
by Anthony P. Breitbach, Scott Reeves and Simon N. Fletcher
Sports 2017, 5(3), 62; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports5030062 - 18 Aug 2017
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 10470
Abstract
Organizations value teamwork and collaboration as they strive to build culture and attain their goals and objectives. Sports provide a useful and easily accessible means to study teamwork. Interprofessional collaborative practice (IPCP) has been identified as a means of improving patient and population [...] Read more.
Organizations value teamwork and collaboration as they strive to build culture and attain their goals and objectives. Sports provide a useful and easily accessible means to study teamwork. Interprofessional collaborative practice (IPCP) has been identified as a means of improving patient and population health outcomes. Principles of teamwork in sports can inform health professionals and organizations regarding possible improvement strategies and barriers in the optimization of IPCP. Twenty-eight delegates from the 2017 All Together Better Health Conference in Oxford, UK participated in a World Café to discuss the how teamwork in sports can inform IPCP in healthcare and sports medicine. These discussions were captured, transcribed and coded using the domains developed by the Interprofessional Education Collaborative (IPEC) along with extrapersonal or interpersonal loci. Extrapersonal factors regarding structure of leadership, roles and organizational commitment can be positive factors to promote teamwork. However, interpersonal factors affecting communication, values and lack of commitment to collaboration can serve as barriers. Athletic trainers and other sports medicine professionals can serve as valuable members of interprofessional teams and teamwork is essential in the field of sports medicine. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Athletic Training)
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