Special Issue "Gender and Identity"

A special issue of Social Sciences (ISSN 2076-0760). This special issue belongs to the section "Gender Studies".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 June 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Brandy L. Simula
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Sociology, Emory University, 229 Tarbutton Hall, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
Interests: gender; sexualities; social psychology; feminist and queer theory; qualitative methods

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Gender plays a critical role in identities and interactions across social settings. This Special Issue explores the intersections of gender and identity, focusing on how gendered identities are constructed, enacted, and navigated in a wide variety of social contexts, including but not limited to: education, workplaces, religious and spiritual life, politics, healthcare settings, and social movements. It examines how gender identity intersects with a range of other social identities and investigates the intersections between identities and inequality. It seeks to highlight a range of epistemological, methodological, and theoretical approaches to the study of gender and identity. Papers from a wide range of relevant social science fields are welcomed. Submissions that center the experiences of people of color and of trans, nonbinary, agender, disabled, and/ or LGBQPIA people are especially encouraged. Submissions should engage with the existing literature on gender and identity and be written in a nontechnical style accessible to a broad interdisciplinary audience.

Manuscripts are invited on topics that include, but are not limited to:

  • The social construction of gendered identities, including trans, genderqueer, non-binary, agender, bigender, gender fluid, and others
  • Socialization to gendered identities over the life course
  • The intersections of gender with other social identities (e.g., race, class, ability, sexual orientation, nation, religion)
  • Gender identity-based social movements
  • Examinations of the ways that gendered identities shape and are shaped by education, workplace, political, religious, healthcare, and other contexts and institutions
  • Resistance to gender and gender-based identities

Dr. Brandy L. Simula
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Social Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • gender
  • identity
  • intersectionality
  • social movements
  • social construction
  • socialization
  • trans

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Ungodly Genders: Deconstructing Ex-Gay Movement Discourses of “Transgenderism” in the US
Soc. Sci. 2019, 8(6), 191; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci8060191 - 17 Jun 2019
Abstract
This research investigates a neglected topic within both transgender studies and religious studies by analyzing ex-gay movement discourses of “transgenderism” from the 1970s to the present, focusing primarily on the US-American context. The oppression of transgender people in the US and globally is [...] Read more.
This research investigates a neglected topic within both transgender studies and religious studies by analyzing ex-gay movement discourses of “transgenderism” from the 1970s to the present, focusing primarily on the US-American context. The oppression of transgender people in the US and globally is fed and fueled by the religious, scientific, and political discourses of the transnational “ex-gay” movement, which provides the ideological and material foundation of Christian Right politics. Using critical discourse analysis of ex-gay texts, we analyze the implications of these discourses in the individual, interactional, and institutional dimensions of society’s gender structure. This movement is one of the most insidious—and overlooked—sources of cisgenderism and transmisogyny today, constructing gender variance as sin, mental illness, and danger—with catastrophic consequences for transgender people, and those along the transfemale/feminine spectrum in particular. Finally, we discuss the public policy implications of these discourses. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gender and Identity)
Open AccessArticle
“Boys ‘Round Here”: Masculine Life-Course Narratives in Contemporary Country Music
Soc. Sci. 2019, 8(6), 176; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci8060176 - 07 Jun 2019
Abstract
Country music remains one of the most popular genres in U.S. American society but is historically under-researched compared to rock, rap and other styles. This article extends the social science literature on the genre by examining themes of masculine identity in popular country [...] Read more.
Country music remains one of the most popular genres in U.S. American society but is historically under-researched compared to rock, rap and other styles. This article extends the social science literature on the genre by examining themes of masculine identity in popular country hits of the current century. A content analysis of 35 top country hits from the last 15 years of the Billboard charts reveals three key masculine archetypes: the lover, the family man and particularly the country boy, which is the dominant masculine image within the last few years of the genre. Together, the three create a life-course narrative where the rambunctious country boy will eventually settle into monogamous heterosexual romance, with marriage and fatherhood presented as the ultimate achievement of successful manhood. A fourth, lesser, archetype, the roughneck, presents an “arrested development” version of the country boy, fully-grown but rejecting the social and familial responsibilities of the other archetypes. These narratives simultaneously challenge some aspects of hegemonic masculinity (urbanity, white-collar labor) while reinforcing others (whiteness, heterosexuality). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gender and Identity)
Open AccessArticle
The Salt without the Girl: Negotiating Embodied Identity as an Agender Person with Cystic Fibrosis
Soc. Sci. 2019, 8(3), 78; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci8030078 - 03 Mar 2019
Abstract
In this manuscript, I build and expand on prior work by myself (Nowakowski, 2016) and others exploring the dynamics of embodiment among people with chronic health conditions. Specifically, I critically investigate the intersecting social and medical elements of responses to bodies perceived as [...] Read more.
In this manuscript, I build and expand on prior work by myself (Nowakowski, 2016) and others exploring the dynamics of embodiment among people with chronic health conditions. Specifically, I critically investigate the intersecting social and medical elements of responses to bodies perceived as too thin and otherwise lacking in physical ability, using my own experiences of living and aging with cystic fibrosis (CF) as a case example. In these explorations, I center gendered identity and its intersection with disabling physical illness. I do so by using my own lived experiences as autoethnographic anchor points to guide critical review of key concepts from the nexus of these two content areas. I focus throughout on exploring how others’ reactions to a frail-looking body often constitute a form of forced gendering via the narratives people attempt to construct for why a person’s body appears that way. The title of the manuscript supports this framework by referencing three cornerstones of patient experience in the CF community: the general trend of patients having salty skin due to the pathology of the disease, a prior embodiment project called Salty Girls (Pettigrew, 2012) that engages this idea, and the more abstract concept of “saltiness” in describing the grit marginalized people display in responding to microaggressions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gender and Identity)
Open AccessArticle
Exploring the Experiences of Heterosexual and Asexual Transgender People
Soc. Sci. 2018, 7(9), 162; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci7090162 - 15 Sep 2018
Cited by 2
Abstract
This article explores two cases at the intersection of emerging studies of transgender experience: heterosexualities and asexualities. Drawing on data from a mixed-methodological survey, we analyze the ways 57 asexual transgender people and 42 heterosexual transgender people occupying varied gender, race, class, age, [...] Read more.
This article explores two cases at the intersection of emerging studies of transgender experience: heterosexualities and asexualities. Drawing on data from a mixed-methodological survey, we analyze the ways 57 asexual transgender people and 42 heterosexual transgender people occupying varied gender, race, class, age, and religious identities (1) make sense of gender and (2) experience coming out as transgender. Our analyses reveal some ways cisnormativity impacts transgender people across sexual identities, and the theoretical potential of incorporating transgender people into studies focused on asexualities and heterosexualities. In conclusion, we outline implications for understanding (1) transgender experiences with cisnormativity across sexual and other social locations and (2) possibilities for expanding studies of heterosexualities and asexualities beyond cisgender experiences. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gender and Identity)
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