Understanding Family Diversity: Inclusive Perspectives

A special issue of Social Sciences (ISSN 2076-0760).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 August 2019) | Viewed by 21947

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
School of Human Environmental Sciences, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701, USA
Interests: campus sexual assault; male perpetrators; sexual harassment; multicultural families; alcohol; intimate partner violence; bystander interventions; adolescent/young adult development

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The diversity of families is arguably greater today than at any other point in history. More children are being raised by single parents, by same-sex parents, in blended families, and in families with mixed race, religion, and ethnicity. However, most family research has been based on samples of white, two-parent, middle-class families. Contemporary patterns of social inequality influence family formation and family relations, including wealth, race, gender, and sexuality. Economic conditions and social inequities can make family life difficult. Furthermore, diverse families are dynamic and changing. Appreciating and respecting diverse types of families may shed light on how families can adapt effectively to adverse circumstances.

We are seeking papers that include research on families across dimensions of diversity such as race/ethnicity, immigration status, geography, military service, sexual preference, gender identity, disability, or other diverse subpopulations. We encourage a variety of papers: conceptual, methodological, narrative reviews, policies, and practices from across the lifespan, as well as systematic studies, experimental research, along with surveys, and qualitative studies.

Dr. Jacquelyn D. Wiersma-Mosley
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • family diversity
  • race/ethnicity
  • immigration
  • gender/sexuality
  • inclusivity

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

12 pages, 267 KiB  
Article
Youth and Caregiver Agreement of Youth Symptoms in Language Concordant and Discordant Dyads: Is Something Lost in Translation?
by Ana J. Bridges, Linda E. Guzman and Alex Melkonian
Soc. Sci. 2019, 8(12), 320; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci8120320 - 21 Nov 2019
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 3504
Abstract
Caregivers are primarily responsible for seeking care on behalf of youth, so understanding how primary language relates to caregiver–youth agreement of youth symptoms is critical to extending the reach of mental health services. In this study, 145 youth (61% female; ages 12–17 years) [...] Read more.
Caregivers are primarily responsible for seeking care on behalf of youth, so understanding how primary language relates to caregiver–youth agreement of youth symptoms is critical to extending the reach of mental health services. In this study, 145 youth (61% female; ages 12–17 years) and their caregivers, who received behavioral health services at primary care clinics, completed measures of youth symptoms in their primary language. We hypothesized primary language concordant caregiver–youth dyads would show higher agreement when reporting on youth symptoms than language discordant dyads, and youth and their caregivers would show higher agreement when reporting on behavioral (e.g., doing drugs, getting into arguments) rather than on internal (e.g., worrying, feeling worthless) symptoms. Overall, agreement in language concordant dyads ranged from r = 0.551 to 0.615, while in discordant dyads agreement ranged from r = 0.279 to 0.441. Consistent with our hypothesis, language concordant dyads demonstrated significantly greater agreement than discordant dyads for most of the analyses. Contrary to our hypothesis, agreement was similar for internalizing and externalizing symptom clusters. Results suggest primary language differences between youth and caregivers are associated with lower agreement about youth problems; youth generally report higher symptom frequency than their caregivers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Understanding Family Diversity: Inclusive Perspectives)
23 pages, 624 KiB  
Article
A College Knowledge Program for Latino Immigrant Families: Examining Parental Academic Involvement and Adolescents’ Academic Goals
by Griselda Martinez and Gabriela Chavira
Soc. Sci. 2019, 8(10), 275; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci8100275 - 29 Sep 2019
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 4690
Abstract
The current study examined how parents’ and adolescents’ reports of parental involvement were associated with adolescents’ academic goals before and after participating in a college knowledge program. Twelve parent-adolescent dyads (Mage = 13.58) participated in the program. Thematic analysis was used to [...] Read more.
The current study examined how parents’ and adolescents’ reports of parental involvement were associated with adolescents’ academic goals before and after participating in a college knowledge program. Twelve parent-adolescent dyads (Mage = 13.58) participated in the program. Thematic analysis was used to analyze these data and create themes that emerged based on patterns in parents’ and adolescents’ semi-structured interviews. Findings suggested that while parents’ reports of their involvement remained relatively the same (high involvement), half of the adolescents indicated increases in their academic goals and perceived parental involvement after participating in the program. This study highlights the role of a college knowledge program on parents’ and adolescents’ changes in perceived parental involvement and academic goals. The study findings identify an avenue to help families access additional capital that can help their children pursue their academic goals. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Understanding Family Diversity: Inclusive Perspectives)
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15 pages, 301 KiB  
Article
“I Need this Chance to … Help My Family”: A Qualitative Analysis of the Aspirations of DACA Applicants
by Yvonne M. Luna and T. Mark Montoya
Soc. Sci. 2019, 8(9), 265; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci8090265 - 19 Sep 2019
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 9720
Abstract
This study explores the aspirations of undocumented youth seeking to defer deportation from the United States and obtain temporary employment authorization through Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA). The data are twenty-three letters submitted from 2013–2015 to a nonprofit foundation in the US [...] Read more.
This study explores the aspirations of undocumented youth seeking to defer deportation from the United States and obtain temporary employment authorization through Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA). The data are twenty-three letters submitted from 2013–2015 to a nonprofit foundation in the US Southwest that provides financial assistance to pay DACA application fees. Conducted within a narrative framework, analysis of emergent themes reveals a story of hope and family that counters the dominant political story of fear and threat to public safety. Specifically, from the DACA applicant’s standpoint, family is their most valuable form of social capital and by providing the means for employment and the education needed to launch a sustainable career, DACA status provides the leverage required to maximize family capital. Our analysis reveals a disturbing disjuncture between their testimonios and the realities of a policy intended to serve as a safety net. The current political climate makes aspirations like theirs increasingly difficult to achieve and may actually exacerbate legal and social liminality. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Understanding Family Diversity: Inclusive Perspectives)
11 pages, 435 KiB  
Article
Parenting Practices and Adjustment Profiles among Latino Youth in Rural Areas of the United States
by Melinda Gonzales-Backen
Soc. Sci. 2019, 8(6), 184; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci8060184 - 12 Jun 2019
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 3437
Abstract
On average, Latino adolescents in the United States (U.S.) are at an elevated risk for developing internalizing symptoms, externalizing behaviors, and engaging in binge drinking. Latino youth in rural U.S. contexts may be particularly at risk. Parent–adolescent relationships may be associated with each [...] Read more.
On average, Latino adolescents in the United States (U.S.) are at an elevated risk for developing internalizing symptoms, externalizing behaviors, and engaging in binge drinking. Latino youth in rural U.S. contexts may be particularly at risk. Parent–adolescent relationships may be associated with each of these indicators of maladjustment, as well as the co-occurrence of these issues. In the current study, adjustment profiles based on internalizing symptoms, externalizing behaviors, and binge drinking among 198 Latino adolescents (Mage = 15.90, SD = 1.47) living in rural areas of the United States were examined. Further, the association of adjustment profiles with parental behavioral involvement, parental monitoring, and familial ethnic socialization was tested. Four adjustment profiles emerged from a cluster analysis (i.e., low risk, internalizing risk, externalizing risk, co-occurring risk). Results indicated that adolescents in the co-occurring risk profile reported the lowest levels of parental monitoring compared to the other three profiles, lower familial ethnic socialization compared to the low risk and internalizing risk profiles, and lower parental behavioral involvement compared to the internalizing risk profile. The findings have implications for family-based, culturally informed interventions to encourage positive adjustment among Latino adolescents in rural areas of the United States. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Understanding Family Diversity: Inclusive Perspectives)
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