Special Issue "The Politics of Race, Ethnicity and Immigration"

A special issue of Social Sciences (ISSN 2076-0760).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 March 2018).

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Lina Newton

Department of Political Science, Hunter College, CUNY, 695 Park Ave, New York, NY 10065, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: American politics; public policy; minority politics; immigration policy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the United States and Europe, official and popular responses to mass migrations have up-ended electoral and legislative politics. One response to immigration has been the rise of nationalism, but racial and ethnic identities have alternatively served to build consciousness, and in some cases galvanized migrant populations to make claims on host societies.

Social Sciences invites submissions for a special issue examining interactions between immigration, race and ethnicity. Methodologically diverse approaches to identifying and analyzing the primacy of racial and ethnic identity in immigration politics and policy are welcome. The scope of this Special Issue is international: Manuscripts attending to political dynamics of race, ethnicity and immigration within or comparing migrant—receiving nations are welcome, as is pertinent research located in or comparing supra—or sub-national governing arrangements.

The Special Issue editor welcomes manuscripts addressing (but not limited to) the following questions:

  • What is the interaction between immigrant policies, racial or ethnic identities, and migrant mobilization? Under what conditions do such mobilizations succeed?
  • How do mass migrations complicate or restructure existing modes of racial or ethnic domination and subordination in receiving countries?
  • How do citizens and/or residents of cities/regions/nations use racial categories to justify their positions on immigration? Do these justifications mirror official language?
  • How have migrant issues disrupted (or reinforced) governing coalitions, institutional arrangements, parties?  How might such changes or retrenchment fare for long-term political incorporation of migrant populations?
Prof. Lina Newton
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Social Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • immigrant incorporation
  • immigrant-led social movements
  • immigrant racialization
  • nativism
  • nationalism
  • immigration and identity politics
  • integration policy
  • populism
  • social construction of target populations

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
National Identity and Migration in an Emerging Gateway Community
Soc. Sci. 2018, 7(5), 73; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci7050073
Received: 15 March 2018 / Revised: 15 April 2018 / Accepted: 15 April 2018 / Published: 26 April 2018
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Abstract
This paper examines how conceptions of national and local identity influence reactions to migration in the Shenandoah Valley, a rural location in Southwest Virginia with unique demographic characteristics. While Shenandoah Valley residents have been predominantly non-Hispanic whites of European descent, a recent visible [...] Read more.
This paper examines how conceptions of national and local identity influence reactions to migration in the Shenandoah Valley, a rural location in Southwest Virginia with unique demographic characteristics. While Shenandoah Valley residents have been predominantly non-Hispanic whites of European descent, a recent visible influx of Hispanic laborers, a higher than national average Muslim population, a history of refugee resettlement and the migration of urbanites from Northern Virginia have made the Valley one of the most diverse locations in the state of Virginia today. Using a qualitative methods approach with both apriori and emergent coding, I offer some insights as to how a traditional ethnic and civic framework of national identity and emergent themes of local identity, including family values and traditionalism, influence reactions to the changing demographics in this rural community. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Politics of Race, Ethnicity and Immigration)
Open AccessArticle
Suspect Outsiders or Prospective Citizens? Constructing the Immigrant/German Boundary in Germany’s Integration Courses
Soc. Sci. 2018, 7(4), 61; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci7040061
Received: 16 March 2018 / Revised: 9 April 2018 / Accepted: 9 April 2018 / Published: 11 April 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (300 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Most scholarship on integration and assimilation in Europe has examined laws, policies and quantitative data to understand the integration of immigrants. Fewer studies have looked at the meaning of integration for immigrants and host societies. This article helps to fill this gap in [...] Read more.
Most scholarship on integration and assimilation in Europe has examined laws, policies and quantitative data to understand the integration of immigrants. Fewer studies have looked at the meaning of integration for immigrants and host societies. This article helps to fill this gap in scholarship by examining the construction of immigrants and Germany in mandatory integration courses in contemporary Germany. Using ethnographic observations of integration courses and discourse analysis of curricular materials, I analyze these constructions using a boundary-construction approach, where both the content of what separates immigrants from host society members, and the brightness of the boundary are used as a basis for viewing immigrants as outsiders versus citizens. I use the terms suspect outsiders and prospective citizens to describe the nature of the immigrant/German boundary based on these constructions. The findings show that three themes—gender and family norms, democracy and rights, and religious freedom—form the content of the immigrant/German boundary. Within these themes, Germany’s civic integration courses generally construct immigrants as prospective citizens by blurring the immigrant/German boundary. The nature of the immigrant/German boundary is crucial for both the integration of immigrants and for Germany. A bright boundary that invokes the notion of immigrants as fundamentally different places the burden of integration on them to change, while a blurred boundary potentially redefines what it means to be German. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Politics of Race, Ethnicity and Immigration)
Open AccessArticle
The Weight of Categories: Geographically Inscribed Otherness in Botkyrka Municipality, Sweden
Soc. Sci. 2018, 7(3), 43; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci7030043
Received: 22 January 2018 / Revised: 26 February 2018 / Accepted: 9 March 2018 / Published: 12 March 2018
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Abstract
This paper asked a paradoxical question: why have immigrants to Sweden (particularly refugees) become geographically, economically, and symbolically segregated despite the putatively generous provisions of Sweden’s welfare state? I sought to understand how people and institutions perceived and deployed categories that created geographically [...] Read more.
This paper asked a paradoxical question: why have immigrants to Sweden (particularly refugees) become geographically, economically, and symbolically segregated despite the putatively generous provisions of Sweden’s welfare state? I sought to understand how people and institutions perceived and deployed categories that created geographically inscribed “Otherness” through a year-long fieldwork in Botkyrka Municipality of the Greater Stockholm area. My analysis weaved together three models for explaining social segregation: the relational, the symbolic, and the spatial. I then augmented these models by taking into account the legal and bureaucratic frameworks that influence social exclusion, as well as historical factors of geographical exclusion. My study revealed how the Swedish government has, despite repeated attempts to integrate immigrant populations into the national identity, nonetheless continued to demarcate immigrant populations both symbolically and geographically, first through a long history of categorizing immigrants as “non-Swedes” (whether as “foreigner,” “immigrant,” or “people with a foreign background”), and through policies that have inadvertently separated the spaces in which immigrants are able to live. Finally, I concluded that the nation’s ethnocultural and Volk-centered definition of nationhood makes it almost impossible for immigrants to be integrated into the Swedish society and propose a shift of academic interests in three aspects. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Politics of Race, Ethnicity and Immigration)
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Open AccessArticle
Social Identity Theory and Public Opinion towards Immigration
Soc. Sci. 2018, 7(3), 41; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci7030041
Received: 17 December 2017 / Revised: 22 February 2018 / Accepted: 5 March 2018 / Published: 8 March 2018
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (1341 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Several scholars have called upon social identity theory to investigate the relationship between an American national identity and American public opinion on immigration. Lacking a uniform measure of American identity, by and large, scholars find that a two-dimensional conception of American identity influences [...] Read more.
Several scholars have called upon social identity theory to investigate the relationship between an American national identity and American public opinion on immigration. Lacking a uniform measure of American identity, by and large, scholars find that a two-dimensional conception of American identity influences these opinions. Our review suggests that the extant measures of American identity do not fully account for the various aspects of social identity theory. We capture more fully the different components of social identity theory. By doing so, we find that American identity has five dimensions. Therefore, in this analysis, we advance a more comprehensive measure of American identity. Analyzing data from the 2004–2005 National Politics Survey, we confirm that all five dimensions of American identity lead to opposition to legal immigration and a preference for spending increases to combat illegal immigration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Politics of Race, Ethnicity and Immigration)
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