Special Issue "Intergenerational Research—A Multi-Perspective Collection of Evidence for Theory and Best Practice"

A special issue of Social Sciences (ISSN 2076-0760).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 19 June 2022 | Viewed by 1794

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Jennifer Kosiol
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of PSY - Health Services Management, Griffith University, Brisbane, QLD 4111, Australia
Interests: health law; health finance; organisational reputation; leadership and intergenerational practice
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Jennifer Cartmel
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Health Sciences and Social Work, Griffith University, Meadowbrook, QLD 4131, Australia
Interests: social and emotional development of children (birth to twelve years); outside school hours care; extended education; critical reflection; workforce capacity; intergenerational programs
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Gaery Barbery
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of PSY - Health Services Management, Griffith University, Brisbane, QLD 4111, Australia
Interests: implementation science; intergenerational work; public health; health services
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Ruth Peters
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Neuroscience Research Australia, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia
Interests: psychology and cognitive sciences not elsewhere classified, epidemiology, public health and health services not elsewhere classified
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Prof. Dr. Anneke Fitzgerald
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Griffith Business School, Griffith University, Gold Coast, QLD 4215, Australia
Interests: process innovation and change management; implementation and quality improvement science; health service management; organisational behaviour in healthcare; professional identity; intergenerational learning
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Intergenerational programs are becoming more important because of their ability to increase confidence, improve communication skills, and build relationships in both older and younger groups. The approaches to intergenerational programs and practices are varied, and the amount of empirical evidence from these programs is increasing. A number of theoretical frameworks are emerging in support of the efficacy of intergenerational practice. Intergenerational practice has gained momentum, with many programs highlighting the mutual benefit of bringing older and younger persons together.

The purpose of this Special Issue is to invite papers that build on the growing evidence base for intergenerational programs in different contexts and from varied perspectives. We welcome contributions from all areas of social science, including social work, social policy, sociology, anthropology, pedagogy, andragogy, psychology, law, health, and management, together with interdisciplinary articles. Papers might have theoretically and methodologically diverse approaches and can explore intergenerational programs in terms of relationships in children’s and older persons’ services; empirical, policy and/or practice perspectives; workforce capacity; architectural and recreational design; curriculum design; pilot projects; and case studies, including large- and small-scale design examples.

Dr. Jennifer Kosiol
Dr. Jennifer Cartmel
Dr. Gaery Barbery
Dr. Ruth Peters
Prof. Dr. Anneke Fitzgerald
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Social Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • intergenerational programs
  • social work
  • social policy
  • pedagogy
  • children’s and older persons’ services

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Intergenerational Practice in the Community—What Does the Community Think?
Soc. Sci. 2021, 10(10), 374; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci10100374 - 07 Oct 2021
Viewed by 1642
Abstract
The many changes that occur in the lives of older people put them at an increased risk of being socially isolated and lonely. Intergenerational programs for older adults and young children can potentially address this shortfall, because of the perceived benefit from generations [...] Read more.
The many changes that occur in the lives of older people put them at an increased risk of being socially isolated and lonely. Intergenerational programs for older adults and young children can potentially address this shortfall, because of the perceived benefit from generations interacting. This study explores whether there is an appetite in the community for intergenerational programs for community dwelling older adults. An online survey was distributed via social media, research team networks, and snowballing recruitment with access provided via QR code or hyperlink. Semi-structured interviews were undertaken with potential participants of a pilot intergenerational program planned for the Eastern Suburbs of Sydney, Australia in 2020. The interviews were thematically analyzed. Over 250 people completed the survey, and 21 interviews took place with older adults (10) and parents of young children (11). The data showed that participants were all in favor of intergenerational programs, but there were different perceptions about who benefits most and how. The study highlighted considerations to be addressed in the development of effective and sustainable intergenerational programs. For example, accessing people in the community who are most socially isolated and lonely was identified as a primary challenge. More evidence-based research is needed to support involvement of different cohorts, such as those who are frail, or living with physical or cognitive limitations. Full article
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