Special Issue "Gender Relations at Work: Persistent Patterns and Social Change"

A special issue of Social Sciences (ISSN 2076-0760). This special issue belongs to the section "Gender Studies".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 August 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Anália Maria Cardoso Torres
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
The Institute of Social and Political Sciences (ISCSP), University of Lisbon, 1649-004 Lisboa, Portugal
Interests: gender sociology; gender inequality; feminist gender studies; contemporary families
Dr. Fátima Maria de Jesus Assunção
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
The Institute of Social and Political Sciences (ISCSP), University of Lisbon, 1649-004 Lisboa, Portugal
Interests: sociology of work; labor relations; work and gender

Special Issue Information

Dear colleagues,

Despite the advances in gender equality that have been witnessed in several countries, gender inequalities in paid and unpaid work persist against the backdrop of economic globalization, contraction of welfare states and proliferation of organizational policies aimed at decreasing the cost of labour. The COVID 19 pandemic, given its effects on the economy, labour markets and households, may put at risk some of the progresses that have been achieved and increase current gender inequalities, but it can also represent an opportunity to renegotiate gender roles at home given the increase in the number of men and women who are working from home. 

This special issue on gender relations at work invites authors to submit papers that discuss current patterns of reproduction and change of gender inequalities in paid and unpaid work at different stages of people’s lives, as well as the ways in which public policies have addressed gender issues in employment and unpaid work. Editors welcome contributions from a feminist or gender perspective that use quantitative, qualitative or mixed methods. Both national and comparative analyses are encouraged as a strategy to promote the discussion of the patterns and trends observed in different social and cultural settings.

Prof. Anália Maria Cardoso Torres
Dr. Fátima Maria de Jesus Assunção
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Social Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • gender relations
  • employment
  • unpaid work
  • gender and COVID 19
  • masculinities
  • public policies

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Article
What You Want Is Not Always What You Get: Gender Differences in Employer-Employee Exchange Relationships during the COVID-19 Pandemic
Soc. Sci. 2021, 10(8), 281; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci10080281 - 22 Jul 2021
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Abstract
Relational Inequality Theory (RIT) argues that relational claims-making- the process of employer-employee exchange relationships explicitly regarding negotiations over resources and rewards- is the central mechanism that produces social inequalities at work. Yet, the COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected employees and employers, possibly altering [...] Read more.
Relational Inequality Theory (RIT) argues that relational claims-making- the process of employer-employee exchange relationships explicitly regarding negotiations over resources and rewards- is the central mechanism that produces social inequalities at work. Yet, the COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected employees and employers, possibly altering their behavior in relational claims-making. Hence, this paper aims to explore if long-standing gender inequalities in employer-employee exchange relationships have reproduced or changed during the COVID-19 pandemic. It is examined (1) whether women and men differ in their response to the pandemic regarding expected employer support with further training to work from home (WFH) and (2) whether employers’ decisions on adequate support depend on employees’ gender. The hypotheses were tested using a linked employer-employee dataset (LEEP-B3) with information on German employees’ working conditions before and during COVID-19. OLS regression models predicted no gender differences in training expectations. However, women are more likely to be provided with less training than they expect from their employers. Thus, employers’ decision-making has not been altered, but gender remains an important determinant in relational claims-making, thereby reproducing gender inequalities. Finally, the workforces’ pre-COVID-19 gender ideologies predicted whether mechanisms are mitigated or enhanced. Hence, these findings underline the crucial role of the workplace context in which employer-employee exchange relationships are embedded. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gender Relations at Work: Persistent Patterns and Social Change)
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Article
Work–Family Articulation Policies in Portugal and Gender Equality: Advances and Challenges
Soc. Sci. 2021, 10(4), 119; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci10040119 - 26 Mar 2021
Viewed by 1445
Abstract
Portugal has been described as a singular case in terms of the participation of women in the labour market and work–life balance policies. Unlike the other so-called Southern European countries, where a belated and somewhat slower move away from the male breadwinner model [...] Read more.
Portugal has been described as a singular case in terms of the participation of women in the labour market and work–life balance policies. Unlike the other so-called Southern European countries, where a belated and somewhat slower move away from the male breadwinner model has been found, Portugal stands out from the other EU member states with its relatively high rate of female employment and the prevalence of the dual-earner model based on continuous and fundamentally full-time employment. Moreover, the “early return to full-time work and a gender equality oriented model” calls for a separate analysis of this country’s case. In addition to providing a comprehensive overview of the singularities of Portugal’s employment patterns and work–family articulation policies, this article substantially adds to the existing literature by bringing new analytical angles to the debate. The intention is therefore to shed light on the political discourses that fuelled the policy debate throughout the three decades following Portugal’s transition to democracy, up until the latest and most decisive policy changes. This article also examines the key social actors’ views about the political process sustaining the development of policies in this area and identifies the major players promoting the most progressive legislative advances in the country. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gender Relations at Work: Persistent Patterns and Social Change)
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Review

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Review
Gender Equality and Modernity in Portugal. An Analysis on the Obstacles to Gender Equality in Highly Qualified Professions
Soc. Sci. 2021, 10(5), 162; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci10050162 - 05 May 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1239
Abstract
In this review article, we argue that the transformations related to the modernisation of Portuguese society triggered by the implementation of democracy did not fully accommodate gender equality. In particular, when we consider the areas where the most progress has been made in [...] Read more.
In this review article, we argue that the transformations related to the modernisation of Portuguese society triggered by the implementation of democracy did not fully accommodate gender equality. In particular, when we consider the areas where the most progress has been made in keeping with a broadly shared urge for modernisation, education and science; whereas women have contributed to boosting the Portuguese population’s level of education, thus inverting the worst legacy of the dictatorship and developing scientific research, gender inequalities are still visible in highly qualified professions. Reviewing the results of studies from different professions, science, medicine and engineering, our analysis illustrates several factors that hinder not only the recognition of women’s competences and merit at work but also their career opportunities. Some of these factors are rooted in the type of gender ideology that was central to the propaganda of the dictatorship, thereby establishing continuity with the previous regime that seems particularly difficult to break in the absence of women’s voices to raise awareness on gender equality. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gender Relations at Work: Persistent Patterns and Social Change)
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