Special Issue "Crime Prevention through Pro-Social Design"

A special issue of Social Sciences (ISSN 2076-0760).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2019)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Rachel Armitage

Department of Behavioural and Social Sciences, School of Human and Health Sciences, University of Huddersfield, Queensgate, Huddersfield HD1 3DH, UK
Website | E-Mail
Interests: crime prevention through environmental design; situational crime prevention; terrorism; CCTV and surveillance; designing out crime

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The extent to which the design of places and spaces can impact on risk of crime victimisation is well established. Research confirms that buildings, and the spaces between those buildings, will experience varying levels of crime based upon their design, build and management. This method of influencing crime risk through design and layout is referred to as Crime Prevention through Environmental Design (CPTED). Whilst this crime prevention approach has been evidenced to impact significantly upon crime (Armitage and Monchuk, 2011; Armitage, 2013; Cozens and Love, 2015), very little is known about the secondary benefits of such design approaches. Are there impacts upon anti-social behaviour, drug use, mental health and physical and social wellbeing?

The principles upon which CPTED is based focus largely upon ‘designing out’ the potential offender. Preventing them from entering a space, enhancing the likelihood of them being observed and/or challenged and frustrating their search behaviour. These mechanisms for reducing crime rely upon the offender being an outsider, someone attempting to enter a given space. Yet we know that this is not the case, and many offenders travel very short distances to commit crimes (Wiles and Costello, 2000). Thus, a presumption that they can simply be ‘designed out’ restricts the maximum potential of such an approach.

This Special Issue of Social Sciences aims to explore the extent to which the design of places and spaces can be harnessed to reduce an individual’s propensity or desire to commit crime and to enhance pro-social behaviour. Submissions are welcomed that consider CPTED from a much broader perspective; exploring the impact of design on, for example, mental health, physical and social wellbeing and drug use.

References:

Armitage, R. (2013) Crime Prevention through Housing Design: Policy and Practice. Palgrave Macmillan: Crime Prevention and Security Management Book Series.

Armitage, R., & Monchuk, L. (2011) Sustaining the Crime Reduction Impact of Secured by Design: 1999 to 2009. Security Journal, 24 (4), 320-343.

Cozens, P., and T. Love. 2015. A Review and Current Status of Crime Prevention through Environmental Design (CPTED). Journal of Planning Literature 30 (4), 393-412.

Wiles, P. and Costello, A. (2000) ‘The Road to Nowhere’: Evidence for Travelling Criminals. Home Office Research Study 207. Research, Development and Statistics Directorate: Home Office.

Prof. Rachel Armitage
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Social Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

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Keywords

  • Crime prevention
  • Crime Prevention through Environmental Design (CPTED)
  • Designing out crime
  • Prosocial places and spaces
  • Wellbeing
  • Housing
  • Urban design
  • Mental health
  • Crime
  • Disorder

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Victimization, Social Structure and Psychosocial Variables: The Case of Spain in 1999 and 2016
Soc. Sci. 2019, 8(3), 102; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci8030102
Received: 8 November 2018 / Revised: 14 March 2019 / Accepted: 20 March 2019 / Published: 22 March 2019
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Abstract
This article reviews the research on the factors influencing victimization and explores the case of Spain. The first section presents a comparative analysis of the data for 1999 and 2016 in terms of perceptions, profiles and the most significant sociodemographic and socioeconomic variables. [...] Read more.
This article reviews the research on the factors influencing victimization and explores the case of Spain. The first section presents a comparative analysis of the data for 1999 and 2016 in terms of perceptions, profiles and the most significant sociodemographic and socioeconomic variables. The second section shows an explanatory analysis based on multivariate logistical regression models, using as independent variables sociodemographic and psychosocial items, and the dependent variable is whether one is described as one is described as a victim or no in the 2016 survey. The results point towards an explanatory model of victimization in which sociodemographic variables play a less important role, whereas psychosocial variables related to lifestyle and subjective perceptions make a significant contribution to greater understanding of the nature of being the victim of a crime and offer suggestions on how to improve Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Crime Prevention through Pro-Social Design)
Open AccessArticle Vehicle Crime, CPTED, and Offending under the Influence: A Qualitative Investigation of Offender Perceptions
Soc. Sci. 2019, 8(3), 88; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci8030088
Received: 14 January 2019 / Revised: 12 February 2019 / Accepted: 6 March 2019 / Published: 9 March 2019
PDF Full-text (1659 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Crime prevention through environmental design (CPTED) can impact upon where an offender decides to commit an offence. This is particularly the case for street-level acquisitive crime. There has been little coverage, within research on crime and offending, of how aspects of the built [...] Read more.
Crime prevention through environmental design (CPTED) can impact upon where an offender decides to commit an offence. This is particularly the case for street-level acquisitive crime. There has been little coverage, within research on crime and offending, of how aspects of the built environment might be interpreted by a motivated offender who has a dependency on either illicit drugs, alcohol or both of these. This study draws on qualitative interviews with twenty individuals who have received criminal convictions for vehicle crime offences. Within these offender interviews, images, of repeatedly victimised areas, were examined in order to gauge in what capacity various locations were vulnerable to vehicle crime. Through this examination, pertinent points were made by participants about how and why the appeal of locations could differ for offenders who suffer from substance addiction and offenders who do not. The key findings of this research demonstrate that vehicle crime offenders who are not dependent on drugs or alcohol, may be more risk-averse than those who are. Moreover, both types of offender might become part of organised crime networks, but these findings make an initial suggestion that those who offend under the influence are more vulnerable to coercion by a criminal hierarchy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Crime Prevention through Pro-Social Design)
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