Special Issue "Supercritical Fluid Extraction"

A special issue of Separations (ISSN 2297-8739).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2018).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Beatriz P. Nobre
Website
Guest Editor
Centro de Química Estrutural, Instituto Superior Técnico, Lisbon University, Lisbon, Portugal
Interests: Supercritical fluids (SCFs); Extraction, fractionation, purification and microencapsulation processes with SCFs and pressurized liquids, supercritical micronization of pharmaceuticals compounds. Use of SCFs for the valorization of biomass (from plants, microorganisms, industrial wastes/by-products) within biorefinery concept. Biological activity of natural compounds (anti-cancer).

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues

This Special Issue is dedicated to supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) research. Supercritical fluids (SCFs) are a class of sustainable green solvents with a broad range of applications. From chemicals to food, nutraceutics, pharmaceutics or bioenergy SCFs have been widely used. The readily tunable solvent properties of SCFs together with the high-diffusivity, low viscosity and low surface tension makes them highly suitable and excellent solvents for extraction, fractionation and purification processes, allowing achieving high yield, high efficiency and good selectivity.

Extraction of added-value compounds from natural sources is a prominent subject on today’s agenda. Market and consumers demand, together with international policies/regulations, increased industrial interest in natural bioactive compounds. SFE of these added-value compounds from natural sources, such as plants, microorganisms (e.g. microalgae, yeasts, fungi and bacteria) or agro-industrial/food/crop wastes is therefore hot topic and a major subject for R&D.

This Special Issue aims to disseminate the latest research regarding SFE. Authors are invited to present contributions related, but not limited, to SFE, fractionation and purification processes. Moreover, papers concerning a combination of SFE and other industrial processes are also encouraged. I hope that the topics included will reflect the high potential of SFE as an alternative green process.

Dr. Beatriz P. Nobre
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Separations is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Supercritical Fluid extraction
  • Supercritical CO2
  • Fractionation
  • Purification
  • Separation
  • Supercritical Fluid Cromatography
  • Natural Products
  • Antioxidants
  • Bioactive compounds
  • Valorisation
  • Sustainability

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Supercritical CO2 Extracts and Volatile Oil of Basil (Ocimum basilicum L.) Comparison with Conventional Methods
Separations 2018, 5(2), 21; https://doi.org/10.3390/separations5020021 - 27 Mar 2018
Cited by 7
Abstract
Interest in new products from aromatic plants as medical and nutritional compounds is increasing. The aim of this work was to apply different extraction methods, including the use of supercritical carbon dioxide extraction, and to test the antioxidant activity of basil (Ocimum [...] Read more.
Interest in new products from aromatic plants as medical and nutritional compounds is increasing. The aim of this work was to apply different extraction methods, including the use of supercritical carbon dioxide extraction, and to test the antioxidant activity of basil (Ocimum basilicum L.) extracts. In vitro efficacy assessments were performed using enzymatic assays. Essential oil obtained by hydrodistillation and volatile oil obtained from supercritical fluid extraction were analyzed by gas chromatography to quantify components. The total phenolic content in the extracts ranged from 35.5 ± 2.9 to 85.3 ± 8.6 mg of gallic acid equivalents and the total flavonoid content ranged from 35.5 ± 2.9 to 93.3 ± 3.9 micromole catechin equivalents per gram of dry weight of extract. All the extracts showed an antioxidant activity with 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), 2,2-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS), and the reducing power test. Extracts obtained from methanol had a higher antioxidant capacity per the DPPH test results (IC50 = 3.05 ± 0.36 mg/mL) and the reducing power test assay 306.8 ± 21.8 μmol of trolox equivalents per gram of extract (TE/g) compared with ethanolic or supercritical fluid extracts. However, using the ABTS assay, the extract obtained by supercritical fluid extraction had a higher antioxidant capacity with an IC50 of 1.74 ± 0.05 mg/mL. Finally, the examined extracts showed practically no acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitory capacity and a slight inhibitory activity against tyrosinase. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Supercritical Fluid Extraction)
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Open AccessFeature PaperReview
Supercritical Fluid Chromatography as a Technique to Fractionate High-Valued Compounds from Lipids
Separations 2018, 5(3), 38; https://doi.org/10.3390/separations5030038 - 27 Jul 2018
Cited by 4
Abstract
Natural products are in high demand these days due to rising awareness among consumers. Healthy diets, especially those in emerging markets, growth in populations with nutritional deficiencies, and supporting government regulations provide high growth opportunities for these compounds. However, extraction of high-valued compounds [...] Read more.
Natural products are in high demand these days due to rising awareness among consumers. Healthy diets, especially those in emerging markets, growth in populations with nutritional deficiencies, and supporting government regulations provide high growth opportunities for these compounds. However, extraction of high-valued compounds from natural sources is not an easy task. Natural products are complex matrices, with relevant compounds present in small amounts and often mixed with other compounds of similar structures. Most of the applications are related to the pharmaceutical sector, but interest in food and natural products is growing fast. Lipid and carbohydrate extracts are examples of starting materials employed to purify these relevant compounds. At the same time supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) is an emerging technique for preparative separation due to (1) use of supercritical fluids, commonly carbon dioxide, giving a large reduction in use of organic solvents; and (2) new hardware has been made commercially available recently that makes SFC a viable option. SFC fulfills high demands with respect to selectivity, versatility and sensibility. Fractionation or purification by SFC of high-valued compounds from natural sources is an interesting option, the relevance of which will increase in the future. This paper is a survey of trends and applications of SFC in the field of natural products purification. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Supercritical Fluid Extraction)
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Open AccessReview
Extraction by Subcritical and Supercritical Water, Methanol, Ethanol and Their Mixtures
Separations 2018, 5(1), 4; https://doi.org/10.3390/separations5010004 - 01 Jan 2018
Cited by 12
Abstract
Hot, subcritical and supercritical water, methanol, ethanol and their binary mixtures have been employed to treat fuels (desulfurize coal and recover liquid fuels from coal and oil shales) and to extract valuable solutes from biomass. The properties of these solvents that are relevant [...] Read more.
Hot, subcritical and supercritical water, methanol, ethanol and their binary mixtures have been employed to treat fuels (desulfurize coal and recover liquid fuels from coal and oil shales) and to extract valuable solutes from biomass. The properties of these solvents that are relevant to their extraction abilities are presented. Various extraction methods: accelerated solvent extraction (ASE), pressurized liquid extraction (PLE), supercritical fluid extraction (SFE, but excluding supercritical carbon dioxide) with these solvents, including microwave- and ultrasound-assisted extraction, are dealt with. The extraction systems are extensively illustrated and discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Supercritical Fluid Extraction)
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