Special Issue "Analytical Methods and Application of Separation Techniques in Food Science"

A special issue of Separations (ISSN 2297-8739). This special issue belongs to the section "Analysis of Food and Beverages".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2022) | Viewed by 4666

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Natalia Drabińska
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Department of Chemistry and Biodynamics of Food, Institute of Animal Reproduction and Food Research of Polish Academy of Sciences, 10-748 Olsztyn, Poland
2. Institute of Food Technology of Plant Origin, Poznań University of Life Sciences, 31 Wojska Polskiego St., 60-624 Poznań, Poland
Interests: food science and nutrition; food chemistry; bioactive compounds; nutritional interventions; clinical trials; volatile organic compounds; gas chromatography-mass spectrometry
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Marta Ferreiro-González
E-Mail Website
Co-Guest Editor
Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, University of Cadiz, Agrifood Campus of International Excellence (ceiA3), IVAGRO, P.O. Box 40, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz, Spain
Interests: chemometrics; fire investigation; headspace-mass spectrometry electronic nose; ignitable liquids; petroleum-based products; gasoline; fire investigation; volatile organic compounds; food adulteration; ion mobility spectroscopy; forensic chemistry; analytical chemistry
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Food products are complex matrices containing various molecules, which can have beneficial or harmful effects on human health, determine the flavour of foodstuffs, and be related to food spoilage. The development of separation techniques resulted in the massive increase of studies focused on the analysis of compounds in food samples.

This Special Issue is going to summarize the recent findings related to the development and application of separation techniques to determine the health-promoting potential, safety, authenticity, and aroma in food products. The Special Issue will be covering various topics, including but not limited to bioactive compounds analysis, method development, omics approaches, volatile organic compounds analysis.

Dr. Natalia Drabińska
Dr. Marta Ferreiro-González
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Separations is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • bioactive compounds
  • volatolomics
  • metabolomics
  • flavouromics
  • sensomics
  • analytical advancements
  • HPLC
  • LC-MS
  • GC-MS
  • GC-O

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Editorial

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Editorial
Analytical Methods and Application of Separation Techniques in Food Science
Separations 2022, 9(5), 109; https://doi.org/10.3390/separations9050109 - 28 Apr 2022
Viewed by 370
Abstract
Food chemistry is a branch of chemistry that aims to characterize the chemical composition of food products, both qualitatively and quantitatively [...] Full article

Research

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Article
The Evaluation of Amino Acid Profiles in Gluten-Free Mini Sponge Cakes Fortified with Broccoli By-Product
Separations 2022, 9(3), 81; https://doi.org/10.3390/separations9030081 - 20 Mar 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 593
Abstract
Many gluten-free products are deficient in amino acids, especially in essential amino acids (EAA). Therefore, the incorporation of additives rich in free amino acids (FAA) into gluten-free products can be a promising strategy to alleviate certain symptoms of celiac disease associated with EAA [...] Read more.
Many gluten-free products are deficient in amino acids, especially in essential amino acids (EAA). Therefore, the incorporation of additives rich in free amino acids (FAA) into gluten-free products can be a promising strategy to alleviate certain symptoms of celiac disease associated with EAA deficiencies. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of the incorporation of broccoli leaf powder (BLP) into gluten-free mini sponge cakes (GFS) on the profile of FFA. BLP replaced an equivalent amount (2.5%, 5%, 7.5%; w/w) of corn and potato starches in GFS formulation, resulting in B1-B3 formulations. The first step was the selection of the most efficient method for extraction of FAA. Extraction based on 50% methanol (method 1) was compared to extraction by 25% of acetonitrile in 0.1 M hydrochloric acid (method 2). In total, 26 and 14 FAA were found in BLP after extraction using methods 1 and 2, respectively. Moreover, considering the total content of FAA, method 1 was more efficient, reaching a 14-fold higher concentration of FFA in BLP compared to method 2. The incorporation of BLP resulted in a significant increase in FAA, irrespective of the applied extraction method. The total concentrations of NEAA and EAA increased significantly in B3 compared to control GFS. In summary, this study showed that 50% methanol was more efficient for the extraction of FFA from plant and bakery matrices. Moreover, BLP was found as a good source of FFA, including EAA, and the obtained experimental GFS could be considered a promising product for individuals on a gluten-free diet. Full article
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Article
Application of Untargeted Metabolomics to Determine Volatile Compounds from the Spanish Plant Arctostaphylos uva-ursi Used as Tea
Separations 2022, 9(3), 68; https://doi.org/10.3390/separations9030068 - 04 Mar 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 608
Abstract
One-hundred and seven different volatile compounds were identified in the samples of Arctostaphylos uva-ursi collected from nine locations in Spain. This plant is commonly brewed and used as tea. Volatile compounds profile was detected using solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The most interesting [...] Read more.
One-hundred and seven different volatile compounds were identified in the samples of Arctostaphylos uva-ursi collected from nine locations in Spain. This plant is commonly brewed and used as tea. Volatile compounds profile was detected using solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The most interesting compounds detected from an antioxidant capacity point of view were esters, phenols, and aromatics compounds. All samples were discriminated by principal component analysis. The insolation and altitude of harvest areas, and latent structures were considered for interpretation of results. Discriminant analysis was applied to control the type and concentration of metabolites and determine the best plant antioxidant profiles of volatile compounds from plant origin. Moreover, a heatmap displayed correlations between detected compounds. The discriminant analysis led to 20 quality markers being identified for the analysed plants. The strongest antioxidant capacity was obtained in the samples from Pina de Montalgrao and Loarre (collected in September) for ORAC (33.11 ± 0.61 g Trolox/g sample) and DPPH (IC50 = 711 ± 12 µg/g) methods, respectively. The plant with the highest total phenolic content was Loarre collected in September (171.9 ± 19.4 mg GAE/g DW) and November (177.1 ± 11.0 mg GAE/g DW). Full article
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Article
Comparison of Phenolic Compounds in Olive Leaves by Different Drying and Storage Methods
Separations 2021, 8(9), 156; https://doi.org/10.3390/separations8090156 - 17 Sep 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 458
Abstract
Oleuropein, a bitter substance that exists in olive leaves, can be hydrolyzed to hydroxytyrosol. These are the main phenolic compounds, and they have beneficial properties to human bodies. In this study, we established a simple and new method to determine oleuropein and hydroxytyrosol [...] Read more.
Oleuropein, a bitter substance that exists in olive leaves, can be hydrolyzed to hydroxytyrosol. These are the main phenolic compounds, and they have beneficial properties to human bodies. In this study, we established a simple and new method to determine oleuropein and hydroxytyrosol quickly by HPLC. HPLC conditions were set as follows: water (A) acetonitrile (B) as mobile phase, gradient elution orders: 90%A–10%B for 0–10 min, 80%A–20%B for 14–30 min, and then change to 90%A–10%B for 30–33 min; detection wavelength: 280 nm. Compared with other detection methods, the method simplified the elution procedure and shortened the time. Additionally, we provided a better drying method and preservation of olive leaves in tea drinking production that were air-dried at room temperature of 25 °C. Full article
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Article
Effect of Ultrasound-Assisted Extraction Parameters on Total Polyphenols and Its Antioxidant Activity from Mango Residues (Mangifera indica L. var. Manililla)
Separations 2021, 8(7), 94; https://doi.org/10.3390/separations8070094 - 30 Jun 2021
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 952
Abstract
Manililla is a mango variety whose residues contain bioactive compounds such as polyphenols and flavonoids, with high added value. The use of environmentally friendly extraction technology would be of great relevance; hence, this study aimed to evaluate the effect of solvent relation, sonication [...] Read more.
Manililla is a mango variety whose residues contain bioactive compounds such as polyphenols and flavonoids, with high added value. The use of environmentally friendly extraction technology would be of great relevance; hence, this study aimed to evaluate the effect of solvent relation, sonication time and amplitude on the ultrasound-assisted extraction of total polyphenols in Manililla mango residues (peel, endocarp and kernel) and antioxidant activity. An experimental design 23 with a central point was used to evaluate the curvature behavior of the process variables. Conventional maceration was used as a control. The better conditions were obtained at the central point using 50% ethanol in water, 60% amplitude and 20 min of sonication time. We obtained values of up to 1814 mg GAE/100 g, 469 mg GAE/100 g and 672 mg GAE/100 g of total polyphenols and 1228 mg QE/100 g, 653 mg QE/100 g and 880 mg QE/100 g of total flavonoids for peel, endocarp and kernel, respectively. Mangiferin was quantified in ultrasound-assisted extraction at 150 mg/g in peel and 0.025 mg/g in the kernel, but it was not detectable in maceration. An antioxidant capacity of 87%, 14% and 83% inhibition for peel, endocarp and kernel, respectively, were obtained. Peel and kernel were the residues with higher potential as extraction material, while endocarp was not. Full article
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Article
Fortified Cold-Pressed Oils: The Effect on Sensory Quality and Functional Properties
Separations 2021, 8(5), 55; https://doi.org/10.3390/separations8050055 - 21 Apr 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 924
Abstract
The aim of this study was to monitor sensory quality, stability, selected nutritionally interesting properties and their changes in cold-pressed oil blends after fortification with chia and sesame seeds and seed oils during repeated thermal treatments. Rapeseed (cv. Sidney) and sunflower (cv. Velox) [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to monitor sensory quality, stability, selected nutritionally interesting properties and their changes in cold-pressed oil blends after fortification with chia and sesame seeds and seed oils during repeated thermal treatments. Rapeseed (cv. Sidney) and sunflower (cv. Velox) seeds from the Czech Republic were used to produce cold-pressed oils, which were fortified with chia and sesame seeds and seed oils in the concentrations of 1% and 5%. In all oil blends, sensory evaluation (quantitative descriptive analysis and hedonic analysis) and chemical analyses (oxidation degree, hydrolytic stability, chlorophyll and carotenoid content) were carried out in order to perform separation of samples degraded by thermal treatment. Assessors representing consumers were able to differentiate between individual thermal treatments from the viewpoint of pleasantness. Interestingly, the overall pleasantness of all fortified oil samples was still acceptable until the second thermal treatment. On the other hand, the results of the study emphasized the problematic oxidation degree of cold-pressed oil blends. The fortification of cold-pressed oils with chia and sesame seeds and oils did not unambiguously lead to better stability during thermal treatment. The application of elevated temperatures during the culinary use of these types of products should be limited to only one thermal treatment since sensory and chemical changes occur after repeated heating. Full article
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