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Special Issue "State-of-the-Art Sensors Technology in Japan 2015"

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2015).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Yoshiteru Ishida
Website
Guest Editor
Toyohashi University of Technology, Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Tempaku, Toyohashi 441-8580, Japan
Interests: global and intelligent sensor networks; adaptive information systems; immunity-based systems; self-repairing networks; dynamical and relational networks; symmetry
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Masahiro Tokumitsu
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Electrical and Control Engineering, Yonago National College of Technology, Hikonacho 4448, Yonago, Tottori 683-0854, Japan
Interests: adaptive information systems; self-repairing networks; sensor networks; satellite networks; space weather; game theory

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The aim of this special issue is to provide a comprehensive view on the state-of-the-art sensors technology in Japan. Research articles are solicited which will provide a consolidated state-of-the-art in this area. The Special Issue will publish those full research, review and high rated manuscripts addressing the above topic.

Prof. Dr. Yoshiteru Ishida
Dr. Masahiro Tokumitsu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

http://publicationslist.org/ishida

Keywords

  • chemical sensors
  • physical sensors
  • remote sensing sensors
  • sensor networks
  • sensor and sensing system technologies for disaster reduction and prevention
  • sensor and sensing technologies for robust and resilient systems
  • sensor systems
  • microarrays
  • sensors for artificial satellites

Published Papers (12 papers)

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial
Introduction to the Special Issue on “State-of-the-Art Sensor Technology in Japan 2015”
Sensors 2016, 16(9), 1350; https://doi.org/10.3390/s16091350 - 23 Aug 2016
Abstract
This Special Issue, “State-of-the-Art Sensor Technology in Japan 2015”, collected papers on different kinds of sensing technology: fundamental technology for intelligent sensors, information processing for monitoring humans, and information processing for adaptive and survivable sensor systems.[...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue State-of-the-Art Sensors Technology in Japan 2015)

Research

Jump to: Editorial, Review

Open AccessArticle
Resilient Sensor Networks with Spatiotemporal Interpolation of Missing Sensors: An Example of Space Weather Forecasting by Multiple Satellites
Sensors 2016, 16(4), 548; https://doi.org/10.3390/s16040548 - 15 Apr 2016
Cited by 2
Abstract
This paper attempts to construct a resilient sensor network model with an example of space weather forecasting. The proposed model is based on a dynamic relational network. Space weather forecasting is vital for a satellite operation because an operational team needs to make [...] Read more.
This paper attempts to construct a resilient sensor network model with an example of space weather forecasting. The proposed model is based on a dynamic relational network. Space weather forecasting is vital for a satellite operation because an operational team needs to make a decision for providing its satellite service. The proposed model is resilient to failures of sensors or missing data due to the satellite operation. In the proposed model, the missing data of a sensor is interpolated by other sensors associated. This paper demonstrates two examples of space weather forecasting that involves the missing observations in some test cases. In these examples, the sensor network for space weather forecasting continues a diagnosis by replacing faulted sensors with virtual ones. The demonstrations showed that the proposed model is resilient against sensor failures due to suspension of hardware failures or technical reasons. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue State-of-the-Art Sensors Technology in Japan 2015)
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Open AccessArticle
Quantitative Evaluation System of Soft Neurological Signs for Children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
Sensors 2016, 16(1), 116; https://doi.org/10.3390/s16010116 - 18 Jan 2016
Cited by 3
Abstract
Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by symptoms of inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity. Soft neurological signs (SNS) are minor neurological abnormalities in motor performance, and are used as one evaluation method for neurodevelopmental delays in children with ADHD. Our [...] Read more.
Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by symptoms of inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity. Soft neurological signs (SNS) are minor neurological abnormalities in motor performance, and are used as one evaluation method for neurodevelopmental delays in children with ADHD. Our aim is to establish a quantitative evaluation system for children with ADHD. We focused on the arm movement called pronation and supination, which is one such soft neurological sign. Thirty three children with ADHD aged 7–11 years (27 males, six females) and twenty five adults participants aged 21–29 years old (19 males, six females) participated in our experiments. Our results suggested that the pronation and supination function in children with ADHD has a tendency to lag behind that of typically developing children by several years. From these results, our system has a possibility to objectively evaluate the neurodevelopmental delay of children with ADHD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue State-of-the-Art Sensors Technology in Japan 2015)
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Open AccessArticle
Soft Neurological Signs in Childhood by Measurement of Arm Movements Using Acceleration and Angular Velocity Sensors
Sensors 2015, 15(10), 25793-25808; https://doi.org/10.3390/s151025793 - 12 Oct 2015
Cited by 4
Abstract
Soft neurological signs (SNS) are evident in the motor performance of children and disappear as the child grows up. Therefore SNS are used as criteria for evaluating age-appropriate development of neurological function. The aim of this study was to quantify SNS during arm [...] Read more.
Soft neurological signs (SNS) are evident in the motor performance of children and disappear as the child grows up. Therefore SNS are used as criteria for evaluating age-appropriate development of neurological function. The aim of this study was to quantify SNS during arm movement in childhood. In this study, we focused on pronation and supination, which are arm movements included in the SNS examination. Two hundred and twenty-three typically developing children aged 4–12 years (107 boys, 116 girls) and 18 adults aged 21–26 years (16 males, two females) participated in the experiment. To quantify SNS during pronation and supination, we calculated several evaluation index scores: bimanual symmetry, compliance, postural stability, motor speed and mirror movement. These index scores were evaluated using data obtained from sensors attached to the participants’ hands and elbows. Each score increased as age increased. Results obtained using our system showed developmental changes that were consistent with criteria for SNS. We were able to successfully quantify SNS during pronation and supination. These results indicate that it may be possible to use our system as quantitative criteria for evaluating development of neurological function. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue State-of-the-Art Sensors Technology in Japan 2015)
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Open AccessArticle
Monitoring of Weekly Sleep Pattern Variations at Home with a Contactless Biomotion Sensor
Sensors 2015, 15(8), 18950-18964; https://doi.org/10.3390/s150818950 - 03 Aug 2015
Cited by 21
Abstract
Many people find that their sleep is restricted or disturbed by social obligations, including work. Sleep phase delays can affect an individual’s circadian rhythms on the following day and cause daytime sleepiness and/or poor performance. In this study, to examine weekly variations in [...] Read more.
Many people find that their sleep is restricted or disturbed by social obligations, including work. Sleep phase delays can affect an individual’s circadian rhythms on the following day and cause daytime sleepiness and/or poor performance. In this study, to examine weekly variations in sleep patterns, we analyzed sleep data for seven-day periods (from Sunday to Saturday) that had been collected from 2914 subjects (aged 20–79 years) over a total of 24,899 subject-weeks using contactless biomotion sensors. On the weekend, the subjects’ mean sleep midpoint, bedtime, and wake-up time were delayed by 40, 26 and 53 min, respectively, compared with those seen on weekdays. In addition, on weekdays, the mean difference between the maximum and median sleep midpoint ranged from 35 to 47 min among the subjects in their 20 s–70 s. The weekend delay and weekday variation in the subjects’ sleep patterns tended to decrease with age. This study detected sleep pattern disturbances on both weekdays and weekends. The serial changes in weekday bedtimes detected in this study suggest that sleep habits are influenced by changes in the temporal patterns of social activities/duties. We need further study the advantages of getting extra sleep and the disadvantages of sleep pattern disturbances in daily lifestyle. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue State-of-the-Art Sensors Technology in Japan 2015)
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Open AccessArticle
Phase Difference Optimization of Dual-Wavelength Excitation for the CW-Photoacoustic-Based Noninvasive and Selective Investigation of Aqueous Solutions of Glucose
Sensors 2015, 15(7), 16358-16371; https://doi.org/10.3390/s150716358 - 07 Jul 2015
Cited by 3
Abstract
Towards the noninvasive and continuous monitoring of blood glucose levels, we chose the continuous-wave photoacoustic (CW-PA) technique and developed the optical power balance shift (OPBS) method. However, operating with optical wavelengths in the near-infrared (NIR) region ensures deep penetration inside human soft-tissue, but [...] Read more.
Towards the noninvasive and continuous monitoring of blood glucose levels, we chose the continuous-wave photoacoustic (CW-PA) technique and developed the optical power balance shift (OPBS) method. However, operating with optical wavelengths in the near-infrared (NIR) region ensures deep penetration inside human soft-tissue, but also leads to two serious issues: strong background level noise from water molecules in this wavelength range and small differences between the absorbance spectra of diluted compounds. To resolve them, the OPBS method relies on simultaneous optical excitation at two wavelengths for differential measurements. However, the first validation in vitro with calibrated aqueous solutions of glucose and albumin revealed strong dependence on the phase difference between the two lights sources. In this paper, we report a systematic investigation of this parameter, from PA-based measurements over a wide range of phase differences and an extensive characterization in the frequency domain. The process of maintaining the phase quadrature of the two optical signals is demonstrated in real time through an analysis of the PA signal and therefore does not require any additional equipment. Finally, a comparison of aqueous glucose solution characterizations at high concentration levels with the two methods was performed and consistent results were obtained. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue State-of-the-Art Sensors Technology in Japan 2015)
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Open AccessArticle
Detection Wavelength Control of Uncooled Infrared Sensors Using Two-Dimensional Lattice Plasmonic Absorbers
Sensors 2015, 15(6), 13660-13669; https://doi.org/10.3390/s150613660 - 10 Jun 2015
Cited by 22
Abstract
Wavelength-selective uncooled infrared (IR) sensors are highly promising for a wide range of applications, such as fire detection, gas analysis and biomedical analysis. We have recently developed wavelength-selective uncooled IR sensors using square lattice two-dimensional plasmonic absorbers (2-D PLAs). The PLAs consist of [...] Read more.
Wavelength-selective uncooled infrared (IR) sensors are highly promising for a wide range of applications, such as fire detection, gas analysis and biomedical analysis. We have recently developed wavelength-selective uncooled IR sensors using square lattice two-dimensional plasmonic absorbers (2-D PLAs). The PLAs consist of a periodic 2-D lattice of Au-based dimples, which allow photons to be manipulated using surface plasmon modes. In the present study, a detailed investigation into control of the detection wavelength was conducted by varying the PLA lattice structure. A comparison was made between wavelength-selective uncooled IR sensors with triangular and square PLA lattices that were fabricated using complementary metal oxide semiconductor and micromachining techniques. Selective enhancement of the responsivity could be achieved, and the detection wavelength for the triangular lattice was shorter than that for the square lattice. The results indicate that the detection wavelength is determined by the reciprocal-lattice vector for the PLAs. The ability to control the detection wavelength in this manner enables the application of such PLAs to many types of thermal IR sensors. The results obtained here represent an important step towards multi-color imaging in the IR region. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue State-of-the-Art Sensors Technology in Japan 2015)
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Open AccessArticle
Ratiometric Molecular Probes Based on Dual Emission of a Blue Fluorescent Coumarin and a Red Phosphorescent Cationic Iridium(III) Complex for Intracellular Oxygen Sensing
Sensors 2015, 15(6), 13503-13521; https://doi.org/10.3390/s150613503 - 09 Jun 2015
Cited by 36
Abstract
Ratiometric molecular probes RP1 and RP2 consisting of a blue fluorescent coumarin and a red phosphorescent cationic iridium complex connected by a tetra- or octaproline linker, respectively, were designed and synthesized for sensing oxygen levels in living cells. These probes exhibited dual emission [...] Read more.
Ratiometric molecular probes RP1 and RP2 consisting of a blue fluorescent coumarin and a red phosphorescent cationic iridium complex connected by a tetra- or octaproline linker, respectively, were designed and synthesized for sensing oxygen levels in living cells. These probes exhibited dual emission with good spectral separation in acetonitrile. The photorelaxation processes, including intramolecular energy transfer, were revealed by emission quantum yield and lifetime measurements. The ratios (RI = (Ip /If) ) between the phosphorescence (Ip) and fluorescence (If) intensities showed excellent oxygen responses; the ratio of RI under degassed and aerated conditions ( R I 0 [email protected]@[email protected]@+= feaagKart1ev2aqatCvAUfeBSjuyZL2yd9gzLbvyNv2CaerbuLwBLn hiov2DGi1BTfMBaeXatLxBI9gBaerbd9wDYLwzYbItLDharqqtubsr 4rNCHbGeaGqiVCI8FfYJH8YrFfeuY=Hhbbf9v8qqaqFr0xc9pk0xbb a9q8WqFfeaY=biLkVcLq=JHqpepeea0=as0Fb9pgeaYRXxe9vr0=vr 0=vqpWqaaeaabiGaciaacaqabeaadaqaaqaaaOqaaabaaaaaaaaape [email protected]@ / RI) was 20.3 and 19.6 for RP1 and RP2. The introduction of the cationic Ir (III) complex improved the cellular uptake efficiency compared to that of a neutral analogue with a tetraproline linker. The emission spectra of the ratiometric probes internalized into living HeLa or MCF-7 cells could be obtained using a conventional microplate reader. The complex RP2 with an octaproline linker provided ratios comparable to the ratiometric measurements obtained using a microplate reader: the ratio of the value of RP2 under hypoxia (2.5% O2) to that under normoxia (21% O2) was 1.5 and 1.7 for HeLa and MCF-7 cells, respectively. Thus, the intracellular oxygen levels of MCF-7 cells could be imaged by ratiometric emission measurements using the complex RP2. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue State-of-the-Art Sensors Technology in Japan 2015)
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Open AccessArticle
Multiple Human Tracking Using Binary Infrared Sensors
Sensors 2015, 15(6), 13459-13476; https://doi.org/10.3390/s150613459 - 08 Jun 2015
Cited by 16
Abstract
To create a context-aware environment, human locations and movement paths must be considered. In this paper, we propose an algorithm that tracks human movement paths using only binary sensed data obtained by infrared (IR) sensors attached to the ceiling of a room. Our [...] Read more.
To create a context-aware environment, human locations and movement paths must be considered. In this paper, we propose an algorithm that tracks human movement paths using only binary sensed data obtained by infrared (IR) sensors attached to the ceiling of a room. Our algorithm can estimate multiple human movement paths without a priori knowledge of the number of humans in the room. By repeating predictions and estimations of human positions and links from the previous human positions to the estimated ones at each time period, human movement paths can be estimated. Simulation-based evaluation results show that our algorithm can dynamically trace human movement paths. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue State-of-the-Art Sensors Technology in Japan 2015)
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Open AccessArticle
Gated Silicon Drift Detector Fabricated from a Low-Cost Silicon Wafer
Sensors 2015, 15(5), 12022-12033; https://doi.org/10.3390/s150512022 - 22 May 2015
Cited by 4
Abstract
Inexpensive high-resolution silicon (Si) X-ray detectors are required for on-site surveys of traces of hazardous elements in food and soil by measuring the energies and counts of X-ray fluorescence photons radially emitted from these elements. Gated silicon drift detectors (GSDDs) are much cheaper [...] Read more.
Inexpensive high-resolution silicon (Si) X-ray detectors are required for on-site surveys of traces of hazardous elements in food and soil by measuring the energies and counts of X-ray fluorescence photons radially emitted from these elements. Gated silicon drift detectors (GSDDs) are much cheaper to fabricate than commercial silicon drift detectors (SDDs). However, previous GSDDs were fabricated from \(10\)-k\(\Omega \cdot\)cm Si wafers, which are more expensive than \(2\)-k\(\Omega \cdot\)cm Si wafers used in commercial SDDs. To fabricate cheaper portable X-ray fluorescence instruments, we investigate GSDDs formed from \(2\)-k\(\Omega \cdot\)cm Si wafers. The thicknesses of commercial SDDs are up to \(0.5\) mm, which can detect photons with energies up to \(27\) keV, whereas we describe GSDDs that can detect photons with energies of up to \(35\) keV. We simulate the electric potential distributions in GSDDs with Si thicknesses of \(0.5\) and \(1\) mm at a single high reverse bias. GSDDs with one gate pattern using any resistivity Si wafer can work well for changing the reverse bias that is inversely proportional to the resistivity of the Si wafer. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue State-of-the-Art Sensors Technology in Japan 2015)
Open AccessArticle
Study of the Relationship between Taste Sensor Response and the Amount of Epigallocatechin Gallate Adsorbed Onto a Lipid-Polymer Membrane
Sensors 2015, 15(3), 6241-6249; https://doi.org/10.3390/s150306241 - 13 Mar 2015
Cited by 10
Abstract
A taste sensor using lipid-polymer membranes has been developed to evaluate the taste of foods, beverages and medicines. The response of the taste sensor, measured as a change in the membrane potential caused by adsorption (CPA), corresponds to the aftertaste felt by humans. [...] Read more.
A taste sensor using lipid-polymer membranes has been developed to evaluate the taste of foods, beverages and medicines. The response of the taste sensor, measured as a change in the membrane potential caused by adsorption (CPA), corresponds to the aftertaste felt by humans. The relationships between the CPA value and the amount of adsorbed taste substances, quinine and iso-α acid (bitterness), and tannic acid (astringency), have been studied so far. However, that of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCg) has not been clarified, although EGCg is abundantly present in green tea as one of its astringent substances. This study aimed at clarifying the response of the taste sensor to EGCg and its relationship with the amount of EGCg adsorbed onto lipid-polymer membranes. The lipid concentration dependence of the CPA value was similar to that of the amount of adsorbed EGCg, indicating a high correlation between the CPA value and the amount of adsorbed EGCg. The CPA value increased with increasing amount of adsorbed EGCg; however, the CPA value showed a tendency of leveling off when the amount of adsorbed EGCg further increased. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue State-of-the-Art Sensors Technology in Japan 2015)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Fiber-Optic Chemical Sensors and Fiber-Optic Bio-Sensors
Sensors 2015, 15(10), 25208-25259; https://doi.org/10.3390/s151025208 - 30 Sep 2015
Cited by 92
Abstract
This review summarizes principles and current stage of development of fiber-optic chemical sensors (FOCS) and biosensors (FOBS). Fiber optic sensor (FOS) systems use the ability of optical fibers (OF) to guide the light in the spectral range from ultraviolet (UV) (180 nm) up [...] Read more.
This review summarizes principles and current stage of development of fiber-optic chemical sensors (FOCS) and biosensors (FOBS). Fiber optic sensor (FOS) systems use the ability of optical fibers (OF) to guide the light in the spectral range from ultraviolet (UV) (180 nm) up to middle infrared (IR) (10 μm) and modulation of guided light by the parameters of the surrounding environment of the OF core. The introduction of OF in the sensor systems has brought advantages such as measurement in flammable and explosive environments, immunity to electrical noises, miniaturization, geometrical flexibility, measurement of small sample volumes, remote sensing in inaccessible sites or harsh environments and multi-sensing. The review comprises briefly the theory of OF elaborated for sensors, techniques of fabrications and analytical results reached with fiber-optic chemical and biological sensors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue State-of-the-Art Sensors Technology in Japan 2015)
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