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Special Issue "Sensor Innovations for Applications in Water Protection and Management"

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Physical Sensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 November 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Fiona Regan
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
DCU Water Institute, Dublin City University, Dublin, Ireland
Interests: optical sensing; analytes (nutrients, metals, E. coli, pharmaceuticals, emerging contaminants); biosensors; centrifugal microfluidic sensors; antifouling for sensors, autonomous systems
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Currently, the most popular sensors for water monitoring applications include monitoring of temperature, conductivity, turbidity, colour, and pH. In recent decades, devices have become smaller and more rugged and stable, leading to greater reliability. In recent years, major advances have taken place in the measurement of species such as trace metals, nutrients (nitrate, nitrite, phosphate, ammonia), and E. coli using electrochemical and optical techniques. The convergence of materials science, engineering, integration, and the demand for new analyte-specific sensors poses a significant challenge, and researchers are delivering exciting new developments.

This Special Issue “Sensor Innovations for Applications in Water Protection and Management” will highlight developments and improvements to sensors and sensing technologies. There is potential for scientists to demonstrate how information supplied from reliable sensors is necessary for the growth of “big” data analytics, creating opportunities for novel applications and alternative measurements.

In particular, this Special Issue invites novel work demonstrating the use of existing sensors in real applications; the development of novel chemical and biosensors for assessment of water quality; low-cost sensors; autonomous systems for long-term deployment; sensors for challenging parameters like bacteria, toxins, emerging contaminants, or other topics that demonstrate the challenge and huge opportunities for new research and development in sensors, engineering, integration, and implementation in real-world challenges.

Prof. Dr. Fiona Regan
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • sensors
  • biosensors
  • transducers
  • optical sensing
  • deployment and field application
  • water quality
  • data analysis

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Open AccessReview
Antifouling Strategies for Sensors Used in Water Monitoring: Review and Future Perspectives
Sensors 2021, 21(2), 389; https://doi.org/10.3390/s21020389 - 08 Jan 2021
Viewed by 636
Abstract
Water monitoring sensors in industrial, municipal and environmental monitoring are advancing our understanding of science, aid developments in process automatization and control and support real-time decisions in emergency situations. Sensors are becoming smaller, smarter, increasingly specialized and diversified and cheaper. Advanced deployment platforms [...] Read more.
Water monitoring sensors in industrial, municipal and environmental monitoring are advancing our understanding of science, aid developments in process automatization and control and support real-time decisions in emergency situations. Sensors are becoming smaller, smarter, increasingly specialized and diversified and cheaper. Advanced deployment platforms now exist to support various monitoring needs together with state-of-the-art power and communication capabilities. For a large percentage of submersed instrumentation, biofouling is the single biggest factor affecting the operation, maintenance and data quality. This increases the cost of ownership to the extent that it is prohibitive to maintain operational sensor networks and infrastructures. In this context, the paper provides a brief overview of biofouling, including the development and properties of biofilms. The state-of-the-art established and emerging antifouling strategies are reviewed and discussed. A summary of the currently implemented solutions in commercially available sensors is provided and current trends are discussed. Finally, the limitations of the currently used solutions are reviewed, and future research and development directions are highlighted. Full article
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Open AccessReview
Multiplexed Passive Optical Fiber Sensor Networks for Water Level Monitoring: A Review
Sensors 2020, 20(23), 6813; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20236813 - 28 Nov 2020
Viewed by 532
Abstract
Water management is a critical mission required to protect the water resources that is essential in diverse industrial applications. Amongst a variety of parameters such as level (or depth), temperature, conductivity, turbidity, and pH, the water level is the most fundamental one that [...] Read more.
Water management is a critical mission required to protect the water resources that is essential in diverse industrial applications. Amongst a variety of parameters such as level (or depth), temperature, conductivity, turbidity, and pH, the water level is the most fundamental one that needs to be monitored on a real-time basis for securing the water management system. This paper presents an overview of water level monitoring technologies based on optical fiber sensor (OFS) networks. Firstly, we introduce and compare the passive distributed and quasi-distributed (discrete) sensor networks with the recent achievements summarized. The performance (i.e., sensing range and resolution) of the OFS networks can be enhanced through diverse multiplexing techniques based on wavelength, time, coherence, space, etc. Especially, the dense wavelength division multiplexing (DWDM)-based sensor network provides remote sensing (where its reach can be extended to >40 km) with high scalability in terms of the channel number that determines the spatial resolution. We review the operation principle and characteristics of the DWDM-based OFS network with full theoretical and experimental analysis being provided. Furthermore, the key system functions and considerations (such as the link protection from physical damages, self-referencing, management of sensing units, and so on) are discussed that could be a guideline on the design process of the passive OFS network. Full article
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Open AccessLetter
A Velocity Meter for Quantifying Advection Velocity Vectors in Large Water Bodies
Sensors 2020, 20(24), 7204; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20247204 - 16 Dec 2020
Viewed by 415
Abstract
A velocity meter was designed and built in order to meet market needs for an affordable instrument that measures the range of velocity magnitudes and direction experienced in medium- to large-sized water bodies. The velocity meter consists of a graduated plate with an [...] Read more.
A velocity meter was designed and built in order to meet market needs for an affordable instrument that measures the range of velocity magnitudes and direction experienced in medium- to large-sized water bodies. The velocity meter consists of a graduated plate with an injector protruding from the center and a camera held downward above the plate. Once the Dye Injection Velocity (DIV) meter is in the flow, dye is injected and the camera records the dye fluid transport. The recorded video is analyzed to determine the local flow velocity and direction. The DIV was calibrated for a range of velocities between 0.0094 m/s and 0.1566 m/s using particle image velocimetry (PIV) in a flow visualization flume. The accuracy of the instrument was found to be +6.3% and −9.8% of full scale. The coefficient of determination of the calibration curve was equal to 98%. Once calibrated, the DIV was deployed to the Inverness Stormwater pond in Calgary, Canada, for validation tests against an Acoustic Doppler Velocity (ADV) meter. During the validation tests, both flow velocity magnitude and direction were measured at several spatial points. The velocity magnitude results showed good agreement and the Mann-Whitney test showed no statistically significant difference (p-value > 0.05). At two spatial points, the differences between direction data were significant, which could be caused by the random errors involved in the validation test. However, the averaged data showed good agreement. Full article
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