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Special Issue "Recent Developments in Sensors for Wearable Device Applications"

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Sensors Development".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2023 | Viewed by 1349

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Rex X. Tan
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Research & Development, Aevice Health Pte Ltd, Singapore 368585, Singapore
Interests: medical devices; wearable sensors; human-computer interaction; health informatics
Dr. Sunit Jariwala
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Clinical & Research Innovation Department, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, NY10461, USA
Interests: health and medical informatics; medical devices; wearable devices
Dr. Ali Asgar Bhagat
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biomedical Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 119077, Singapore
Interests: medical device development; microfluidics; diagnostic development
Dr. Yung Chuen Tan
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Agency for Science, Technology and Research, Singapore 637145, Singapore
Interests: lasers; optics; optical fiber sensors; wearable sensors

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Wearable sensors provide avenues of direct measurement of various physiological and biochemical data from wearers longitudinally. This capability had already begun to change the way we live our lives, deliver healthcare, and perform day-to-day tasks.

In the current state, limitations are still present in multiple aspects for efficient real-life implementation of wearable sensors. Advances in material science, electronics, computing, and data science enabled numerous wearable applications and are at the core of the realization of wearable sensors and are of interest to this Special Issue.

Potential topics include but are not limited to:

  • Design, and implementation of novel wearable sensors
  • Novel material for wearable sensors
  • Data processing for wearable devices
  • Algorithms for signal processing with wearable sensor
  • Implementation of wearable sensors in health monitoring
  • Development of wearable sensors for physiological monitoring
  • Development of wearable sensor for biochemical monitoring
  • Development of wearable sensors for human augmentation
  • IoT-based wearable sensor systems
  • Hardware design of sensors for wearable applications

Dr. Rex X. Tan
Dr. Sunit Jariwala
Dr. Ali Asgar Bhagat
Dr. Yung Chuen Tan
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
A Survey on Wearable Sensors for Mental Health Monitoring
Sensors 2023, 23(3), 1330; https://doi.org/10.3390/s23031330 - 25 Jan 2023
Viewed by 368
Abstract
Mental illness, whether it is medically diagnosed or undiagnosed, affects a large proportion of the population. It is one of the causes of extensive disability, and f not properly treated, it can lead to severe emotional, behavioral, and physical health problems. In most [...] Read more.
Mental illness, whether it is medically diagnosed or undiagnosed, affects a large proportion of the population. It is one of the causes of extensive disability, and f not properly treated, it can lead to severe emotional, behavioral, and physical health problems. In most mental health research studies, the focus is on treatment, but fewer resources are focused on technical solutions to mental health issues. The present paper carried out a systematic review of available literature using PRISMA guidelines to address various monitoring solutions in mental health through the use of wearable sensors. Wearable sensors can offer several advantages over traditional methods of mental health assessment, including convenience, cost-effectiveness, and the ability to capture data in real-world settings. Their ability to collect data related to anxiety and stress levels, as well as panic attack Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Developments in Sensors for Wearable Device Applications)
Article
Integrated Mechano-Electrochemical Harvesting Fiber and Thermally Responsive Artificial Muscle for Self-Powered Temperature–Strain Dual-Parameter Sensor
Sensors 2023, 23(1), 269; https://doi.org/10.3390/s23010269 - 27 Dec 2022
Viewed by 724
Abstract
Significant progress in healthcare fields around the world has inspired us to develop a wearable strain–temperature sensor that can monitor biomedical signals in daily life. This novel self-powered temperature–strain dual-parameter sensor comprises a mechano-electrochemical harvester (MEH) and a thermally responsive artificial muscle (TAM). [...] Read more.
Significant progress in healthcare fields around the world has inspired us to develop a wearable strain–temperature sensor that can monitor biomedical signals in daily life. This novel self-powered temperature–strain dual-parameter sensor comprises a mechano-electrochemical harvester (MEH) and a thermally responsive artificial muscle (TAM). The MEHTAM system generates electricity from strain and thermal fluctuations. In addition, the sensor is comfortable to wear, owing to its stretchability (>100%), softness (<3 MPa), and one-dimensional fibers (diameter 230 μm). The MEH induces a change in the electrochemical capacitance, resulting in an electrical signal under applied strain (34 μA/m) and stress (20 μA/(m·MPa)). The TAM can be used as a mechanical temperature sensor, because the tensile stroke responds linearly to changes in temperature. As the harvester and artificial muscle are combined, the MEHTAM system generates electricity, owing to external and internal mechanical stimuli caused by muscle contractions as a response to temperature changes. The MEHTAM system that we have developed—a self-powered, strain–temperature dual-parameter sensor that is soft, stretchable, and fiber-shaped—is an interesting candidate for the production of comfortable, wearable, dual-parameter sensors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Developments in Sensors for Wearable Device Applications)
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