Special Issue "Religion, Nationalism and Populism across the North/South Divide"

A special issue of Religions (ISSN 2077-1444).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 January 2021).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Jocelyne Cesari
Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
1. Department of Theology and Religion, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK
2. Department of Government, Georgetown University, Georgetown360, 37th and O Streets NW, Washington, DC 20057, USA
Interests: religion and politics; political Islam
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In Europe and the United States, religion has become a significant component of the growing nationalist and supremacist political groups which contest the fundamental rights of religious, sexual, or racial minorities in the name of their religious identity. Outside Western secular democracies, the rise of religious claims not only impinges on civil rights but also on the rule of law and democratic life in general.

This Special Issue will examine the religious dimension of populism and nationalism across countries, religious traditions, and historical periods. To do so, it will for the first time bring together scholars of religion and politics to comparatively explore the rise of extreme-right movements in Europe and the white supremacist groups in the USA, but also rise of authoritarian figures in Turkey, Russia, and India. To that effect, we are inviting contributions from different disciplines, addressing specific case studies in and beyond the West as well as thematic and theoretical approaches across case studies.

Prof. Dr. Jocelyne Cesari
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Religions is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • populism
  • religion
  • nationalism
  • interdisciplinary approach

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Exclusionary Populism and Islamophobia: A Comparative Analysis of Italy and Spain
Religions 2020, 11(10), 516; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel11100516 - 10 Oct 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Exclusionary populism is well known for twisting real grievances of the citizens, by problematizing the gap between “us” and “them”, capitalizing on identity lines, calling out as “others” those who do not share “pure people’s” identity and culture. Especially after 9/11, Muslims have [...] Read more.
Exclusionary populism is well known for twisting real grievances of the citizens, by problematizing the gap between “us” and “them”, capitalizing on identity lines, calling out as “others” those who do not share “pure people’s” identity and culture. Especially after 9/11, Muslims have become the ideal-type of “other”, making Islamophobia the primary populist anti-paradigm. This article contributes to the burgeoning literature on Islamophobic populism analyzing the presence of Islamophobia in the electoral discourse of Vox party in Spain and Lega in Italy. In addition, it makes a novel contribution by discussing and testing the existence of different models of Islamophobia, distinguishing between “banal Islamophobia” and “ontological Islamophobia”. Applying clause-based semantic text analysis—including qualitative and quantitative variables—to thirty speeches by the two party leaders, Santiago Abascal and Matteo Salvini, during the last three elections (General, Regional and European), the paper concludes that, despite the similarities, the two politician display two different models of Islamophobia. Whereas Abascal displays a clear “ontological Islamophobia”, depicting Muslims ontologically incompatible with Spanish civilization (defined precisely by its anti-Muslim history), the latter presents a mix of arguments that oscillate between “ontological” and “banal” Islamophobia. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Religion, Nationalism and Populism across the North/South Divide)
Open AccessArticle
Right-Wing Populism and Religion in Europe and the USA
Religions 2020, 11(10), 490; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel11100490 - 27 Sep 2020
Abstract
The aim of this paper is to examine comparatively the growth and political effectiveness of right-wing populism in Western Europe, Central Europe, and the USA since 9/11. The focus is on such politicians’ vilification of Islam as a faith and Muslims as a [...] Read more.
The aim of this paper is to examine comparatively the growth and political effectiveness of right-wing populism in Western Europe, Central Europe, and the USA since 9/11. The focus is on such politicians’ vilification of Islam as a faith and Muslims as a people. The paper examines the following research question: how and why do right-wing populists in the USA and Europe use an ideological form of “Christianity”, known variously as “Christianism” or “Christian civilizationism”, to vilify Muslims and Islam? The political purpose seems obvious: to influence public perceptions and to win votes by questioning the desirability of Muslims in both the USA and Europe, claiming that Muslims’ religious and cultural attributes make them unacceptable as neighbors. As Muslims are not capable, so the argument goes, of assimilating to European or American norms, values, and behavior, then they must be excluded or strongly controlled for the benefit of nativist communities. Right-wing populists in both the USA and Europe pursue this strategy because they see it as chiming well with public opinion at a time of great uncertainty, instability, and insecurity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Religion, Nationalism and Populism across the North/South Divide)
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