Special Issue "Water Recovery Recycling and Resilience"

A special issue of Recycling (ISSN 2313-4321).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 February 2018)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Alex Godoy-Faundez

Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad del Desarrollo, Santiago, Chile
Website | E-Mail
Interests: water sustainability; waste to energy; materials and energy recovery; sustainability science; industrial ecology; material flow analysis; environmental policy; water-energy.food/wastes security
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Diego Rivera

Departamento de Recursos Hídricos Facultad de Ingeniería Agrícola, Universidad de Concepción, Chillán, Chile
Website | E-Mail
Interests: climate variability and agriculture; hydrological modeling; transport processes; self-organizing maps in data exploration

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Due to increasing water demand from human activities, water scarcity is an increasing problem, particularly under the risks of climate change. Increasing water demand also increases pressure on watersheds, given the geographical overlap between agriculture; hydropower, mining, tourism, and urban population. This pressure can also extend to social-environmental conflicts related to water availability, particularly when multiple users share the same location. These potential water imbalances have driven political discussion towards more focus on water governance issues and the role of Nations/States in also allocating and prioritising water’s rights as human rights.

The focus of this Special Issue is on reduction of water consumption by water recovery and recycling as tool for water management. The reduction of water consumption through water reuse and recycling are key challenges for industrial, sanitary, mining and agriculture water resource activities.

It is hoped that this Special Issue of Recycling will provide useful insights into the latest management, technology, and operational innovations to improve water management and resource recovery promoting industrial water management resilience across the world.

Prof. Dr. Alex Godoy-Faundez

Prof. Dr. Diego Rivera

Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Recycling is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Water Management
  • Water Recycling
  • Water Technology
  • Water Treatment
  • Water Recovery
  • Water Engineering
  • Water Innovation
  • Water Resilience

Published Papers (2 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-2
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle Valorization of Municipal Waterworks Sludge to Produce Ceramic Floor Tiles
Received: 22 December 2017 / Revised: 11 February 2018 / Accepted: 22 February 2018 / Published: 17 March 2018
PDF Full-text (4191 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In municipal waterworks large amounts of waste in the form of sludge have to be discarded. This investigation focuses on the processing of ceramic floor tiles incorporated with a municipal waterworks sludge. Four floor tile formulations containing up to 10 wt. % of [...] Read more.
In municipal waterworks large amounts of waste in the form of sludge have to be discarded. This investigation focuses on the processing of ceramic floor tiles incorporated with a municipal waterworks sludge. Four floor tile formulations containing up to 10 wt. % of the municipal waterworks sludge were prepared in order to replace the kaolin. The floor tile processing route consisted of dry powder granulation, uniaxial pressing, and firing between 1190 and 1250 °C using a fast-firing cycle (<60 min). The densification behavior and technological properties of the floor tile pieces as function of the sludge addition and firing temperature were determined. The development of the microstructure was followed by XRD and SEM/EDS. The results show that the replacement of kaolin with municipal waterworks sludge, in the range up to 10 wt. %, allows the production of ceramic floor tiles (group BIb and group BIIa, ISO 13006 Standard) at lower firing temperatures. These results suggest a new possibility of valorization of municipal waterworks sludge in order to bring economic and environmental benefits. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Water Recovery Recycling and Resilience)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Social Acceptance for Reclaimed Water Use: A Case Study in Bengaluru
Received: 9 November 2017 / Revised: 6 January 2018 / Accepted: 9 January 2018 / Published: 20 January 2018
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (1093 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The main source of water to the peri-urban areas of Bengaluru is groundwater. Access to groundwater is through tankers, private borewells, Bruhat Bengaluru MahanagaraPalike (Urban Local Body) borewells, and public stand posts. All modes other than tankers provide water to the community free [...] Read more.
The main source of water to the peri-urban areas of Bengaluru is groundwater. Access to groundwater is through tankers, private borewells, Bruhat Bengaluru MahanagaraPalike (Urban Local Body) borewells, and public stand posts. All modes other than tankers provide water to the community free of charge. Reclaimed water from sewage treatment plants (STPs) is in use by industries and some gated communities and multistoried apartments for toilet flushing and landscaping. For individual households in peri-urban areas of Bengaluru, it could be an additional water source replacing expensive water supply through tankers; reducing demand for groundwater (a finite resource); improving the sanitation system by providing drainage systems and preventing groundwater contamination from black and grey water. Consequently, this research paper investigates the willingness of residents in peri-urban areas of Bengaluru to use reclaimed water for non-potable end uses. To investigate residents’ willingness and key motivations for the use of reclaimed water, a survey of residents in the peri-urban ward of Bellandur was conducted. In this region, the sewerage board had prepared a media advertisement to create awareness of—and to sell—reclaimed water to other users, including local residents. This advertisement was shown to respondents, asking if they were willing to accept and buy the reclaimed water at 15 Indian Rupees (INR) per kiloliter. Sixty-seven percent of residents who were household owners were willing to buy reclaimed water, 20% were concerned about hygiene, and 33% of respondents lacked trust in the public agency with respect to water quality standards. The study concludes that public awareness from key stakeholders is essential for the reuse of reclaimed water. It also recommends stringent regulation by levying fees for groundwater extraction in addition to making reclaimed water readily available and supplied free of charge to the consumers. In addition, the quality of reclaimed water should meet international standards to gain the confidence of the people. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Water Recovery Recycling and Resilience)
Figures

Figure 1

Recycling EISSN 2313-4321 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top