Behavioral Operations Management

A special issue of Psych (ISSN 2624-8611). This special issue belongs to the section "Neuropsychology, Mental Health and Brain Disorders".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 September 2019) | Viewed by 16278

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Faculty of Management, University of Tehran, 14114 Tehran, Iran
Interests: decision making; motivation and performance; behavioral economics; behavioral operations management

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

I would like to invite you to send papers to our Special Issue on behavioural operations management (BOM). Behavioural operations management addresses the role of humans in operations management. It is one of the burgeoning areas in operations management with an interdisciplinary nature (Bendoly, Croson, Goncalves and Schultz, 2010; Gans and Croson, 2008; Katsikopoulos and Gigrenzer, 2013; Kaufmann, Carter and Buhrmann, 2010). Our main purpose in this Special Issue is to examine behavioural operations management from the viewpoint of other disciplines, such as cognitive and social psychology, and neuropsychology. We are interested in studies that apply interdisciplinary theories to shed light on new aspects of human behaviour and decision making in operational contexts. Despite the calls for deeper theoretical development in behavioural operations management, there is still room for growth and improvement by incorporating different theoretical perspectives in operations management. Currently, the field highly relies on a few theories related to heuristics-and-biases, bounded rationality, motivation, feedback, and learning. Furthermore, heuristics have been mainly considered as cognitive limitations (Croson and Donohue, 2002) which result in deviations from the assumptions of hyper-rationality and therefore, act as a liability. This is demonstrated by the common use of the "heuristics-and-biases" terminology in behavioural operations research (Carter et al., 2007; Loch and Wu, 2005). Similarly, in the individual differences line, which has received attention from behavioural operations researchers in the past few years, the main focus is on the rational/analytical thinking style while other aspects, such as intuitiveness and creative thinking styles, have not received equal attention in operational contexts.

Considering these factors, in this Special Issue we want to extend the knowledge in BOM by both building on the past research and adding to it with a novel perspective that can enrich the BOM literature in order to create a deeper understanding of the interaction between humans and operational contexts.

Dr. Rosa Hendijani
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • Behavioral operations management
  • Behavioral supply chain management
  • Human judgment and decision making
  • Heuristics
  • Social psychology
  • Cognitive psychology
  • Neuropsychology
  • Individual differences

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

11 pages, 231 KiB  
Article
The Relationship between Sense of Coherence, Stress, Body Image Satisfaction and Eating Behavior in Japanese and Austrian Students
by Yoshiko Kato, Elfriede Greimel, Chenghong Hu, Maria Müller-Gartner, Beate Salchinger, Wolfgang Freidl, Seiichi Saito and Roswith Roth
Psych 2019, 1(1), 504-514; https://doi.org/10.3390/psych1010039 - 14 Nov 2019
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 3913
Abstract
Background: Restrained, emotional, and external eating are related to obesity and eating disorders. A salutogenic model has confirmed sense of coherence (SOC) as a health resource that moderates stress and helps limit the occurrence of overweightness and eating disorders. This study aimed to [...] Read more.
Background: Restrained, emotional, and external eating are related to obesity and eating disorders. A salutogenic model has confirmed sense of coherence (SOC) as a health resource that moderates stress and helps limit the occurrence of overweightness and eating disorders. This study aimed to examine the relationship between SOC, social support, stress, body image satisfaction (BIS) and eating behaviors in different cultural environments. Methods: A total of 371 Austrian (161 men, 210 women) and 398 Japanese (226 men, 172 women) university students participated. The SOC-13 scale, Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support, Dutch Eating Behavior Questionnaire, BMI-Based Silhouette Matching Test and an analogue single-stress item were used as measurements. Results: SOC negatively affected all three types of eating in Austrian students (men: β = −0.227 to −0.215; women: β = −0.262 to −0.214). In Japanese students, SOC negatively affected external eating in both sexes (men: β = −0.150; women: β = −0.198) and emotional eating (β = −0.187) in men. BIS indicated that the desire to become slim predicted restrained eating, women’s emotional eating, and men’s and Austrian women’s external eating. Stress was only predictive of emotional eating in Japanese men. Conclusions: This study found that SOC, BIS and stress might be valuable factors regulating eating behavior in a cultural context. However, the relationship between SOC, BIS, stress and eating behavior differs between cultures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Behavioral Operations Management)
8 pages, 969 KiB  
Article
Effects of Back Touching on Tidal Volume
by Taichi Hitomi, Chigusa Theresa Yachi and Hajime Yamaguchi
Psych 2019, 1(1), 412-419; https://doi.org/10.3390/psych1010031 - 11 Jul 2019
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 3437
Abstract
The purpose of this basic experiment was to examine the effects of soft touching on an experiment participant’s back on tidal volume (TV), as an increase in TV was considered an indication of enhanced relaxation. Healthy experiment participants were divided into an intervention [...] Read more.
The purpose of this basic experiment was to examine the effects of soft touching on an experiment participant’s back on tidal volume (TV), as an increase in TV was considered an indication of enhanced relaxation. Healthy experiment participants were divided into an intervention group, where soft touching was administered for two minutes on their back, and a control group, where they were asked to rest. Then the change in TV was measured using a spiro-meter two factor analysis of variance (ANOVA; mixture design) was conducted. As a result of two factor ANOVA, the intervention group’s TV changed with statistical significance, while no statistically significant change was observed in the control group. There was a possibility that soft touching on the back had a positive effect on the increase of TV and relaxation. As a result of soft touching on the back, TV was increased. Subjective indicators suggested that the relaxation was enhanced by soft touching on the back. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Behavioral Operations Management)
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11 pages, 1090 KiB  
Article
Prediction of Personality Profiles in the Pakistan Software Industry–A Study
by Ali Hasan, Sana Moin and Maruf Pasha
Psych 2019, 1(1), 320-330; https://doi.org/10.3390/psych1010022 - 03 Jun 2019
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 4660
Abstract
Psychology says not everyone is able to do all type of tasks assigned to them. This point is valid for people working in the software industries as well. Therefore, when assigning the most suitable tasks to people according to their personality type, a [...] Read more.
Psychology says not everyone is able to do all type of tasks assigned to them. This point is valid for people working in the software industries as well. Therefore, when assigning the most suitable tasks to people according to their personality type, a software development company’s succession rate can be proliferated to a remarkable level. In this manner, the main theme of this empirical research is to find relationships that establish links between personality type and their job designation preferences in the software industry. For this purpose, this study is comprised of 44 Pakistan developers, who are working in different software houses and are directly involved in developing software projects. In addition, an MBTI (Myers-Briggs Type Indicator) test indicator is used for the link establishment. With respect to the reported results, tester, team lead, and project manager are found to be ENFJs, which is the least common type in software developers. However, for web developers and software engineers, ISFJ is found to be the most preferable type, with an edge over ENFJ. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Behavioral Operations Management)
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20 pages, 461 KiB  
Article
Debiasing in a Minute or Less, or Too Good to Be True? The Effect of Micro-Interventions on Decision-Making Quality
by Marko Kovic
Psych 2019, 1(1), 220-239; https://doi.org/10.3390/psych1010016 - 16 May 2019
Viewed by 3704
Abstract
In this study, the effects of a novel debiasing micro-intervention (an intervention that requires no training or instructions) are tested in three experiments. The intervention is epistemologically informed and consists of two questions that prompt the quantification of degrees of a belief (“How [...] Read more.
In this study, the effects of a novel debiasing micro-intervention (an intervention that requires no training or instructions) are tested in three experiments. The intervention is epistemologically informed and consists of two questions that prompt the quantification of degrees of a belief (“How certain am I?”) and the justification of a belief (“Why?”). In all three experiments, this intervention was ineffective. Unexpectedly, however, when the micro-intervention consisted only of the justification question (“Why?”), there was a small, but noticeable positive effect in two experiments. Overall, even though the hypothesized effects were not observable, a justification prompt might be a potentially effective micro-intervention that should be explored in future research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Behavioral Operations Management)
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