Special Issue "Spectroscopic Techniques for Polymers and Polymer Composites"

A special issue of Polymers (ISSN 2073-4360). This special issue belongs to the section "Polymer Analysis".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Liliane Bokobza
E-Mail
Guest Editor
196 Boulevard Bineau 92200 Neuilly-Sur-Seine, France
Interests: vibrational and fluorescence spectroscopies; polymer nanocomposites; elastomeric networks; reinforcement; mechanical and electrical properties; sol–gel in situ generation of filler particles; carbon nanomaterials

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Molecular spectroscopies have been widely used to obtain information on several polymer characteristics including chemical composition, tacticity, comonomer sequence distribution in copolymers, compatibility in polymer blends, orientation of macromolecular chains, etc.

The significance of the spectroscopic techniques is particularly demonstrated in the field of polymer composites, especially for the characterization of polymer-filler interfaces, which have been shown to largely govern the properties of composite materials. Filler morphology, interacting species, confinement effects, intercalation or exfoliation processes in layered filler structures, and dynamics of polymer chains in the interfacial region are examples of issues that can be investigated by spectroscopic techniques.

This present Special Issue will be focused on "Spectroscopic Techniques for Polymers and Polymer Composites". Papers dealing with infrared, Raman, solid-state NMR, fluorescence, and dielectric spectroscopic techniques, among others, applied in the field of polymers or polymer composites are welcome. Studies combining spectroscopy with microscopy will also be highly appreciated. 

Prof. Dr. Liliane Bokobza
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Polymers is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • infrared
  • Raman
  • fluorescence
  • solid-state NMR
  • UV-visible
  • electron paramagnetic resonance
  • dielectric spectroscopy
  • polymers
  • polymer composites

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
XPS and FTIR Studies of Polytetrafluoroethylene Thin Films Obtained by Physical Methods
Polymers 2019, 11(10), 1629; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym11101629 - 09 Oct 2019
Abstract
Two methods—attenuated total reflection Fourier infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)—have been used to analyze the chemical structure of polytetrafluorethylene (PTFE) thin coatings deposited by pulsed laser (PLD) and pulsed electron beam (PED) ablations. The volume of the analyzed materials is [...] Read more.
Two methods—attenuated total reflection Fourier infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)—have been used to analyze the chemical structure of polytetrafluorethylene (PTFE) thin coatings deposited by pulsed laser (PLD) and pulsed electron beam (PED) ablations. The volume of the analyzed materials is significantly different in these techniques which can be of great importance in the characterization of highly heterogeneous thin films. Optical microscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) have been additionally used to examine the coating surface morphology. The studies have shown that in the case of thin polymer coatings deposited by physical methods, the application for chemical structure evaluation of complementary techniques, with different surface sensitivity, together with the use of surface topography imaging, provide unique insight into the film morphology. The results can provide information contributing to an in-depth understanding of the deposition mechanism of polymer coatings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Spectroscopic Techniques for Polymers and Polymer Composites)
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Open AccessArticle
Synthesis, Crystal Structures, and Spectroscopic Characterization of Bis-aldehyde Monomers and Their Electrically Conductive Pristine Polyazomethines
Polymers 2019, 11(9), 1498; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym11091498 - 13 Sep 2019
Abstract
Bis-aldehyde monomers 4-(4′-formyl-phenoxy)benzaldehyde (3a), 3-methoxy-4-(4′-formyl-phenoxy)benzaldehyde (3b), and 3-ethoxy-4-(4′-formyl-phenoxy)benzaldehyde (3c) were synthesized by etherification of 4-fluorobenzaldehyde (1) with 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde (2a), 3-methoxy-4-hydroxybenzaldehyde (2b), and 3-ethoxy-4-hydroxybenzaldehyde (2c), respectively. Each monomer was polymerized [...] Read more.
Bis-aldehyde monomers 4-(4′-formyl-phenoxy)benzaldehyde (3a), 3-methoxy-4-(4′-formyl-phenoxy)benzaldehyde (3b), and 3-ethoxy-4-(4′-formyl-phenoxy)benzaldehyde (3c) were synthesized by etherification of 4-fluorobenzaldehyde (1) with 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde (2a), 3-methoxy-4-hydroxybenzaldehyde (2b), and 3-ethoxy-4-hydroxybenzaldehyde (2c), respectively. Each monomer was polymerized with p-phenylenediamine and 4,4′-diaminodiphenyl ether to yield six poly(azomethine)s. Single crystal X-ray diffraction structures of 3b and 3c were determined. The structural characterization of the monomers and poly(azomethine)s was performed by FT-IR and NMR spectroscopic techniques and elemental analysis. Physicochemical properties of polymers were investigated by powder X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), viscometry, UV–vis, spectroscopy and photoluminescence. These polymers were subjected to electrical conductivity measurements by the four-probe method, and their conductivities were found to be in the range 4.0 × 10−5 to 6.4 × 10−5 Scm−1, which was significantly higher than the values reported so far. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Spectroscopic Techniques for Polymers and Polymer Composites)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Some Applications of Vibrational Spectroscopy for the Analysis of Polymers and Polymer Composites
Polymers 2019, 11(7), 1159; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym11071159 - 08 Jul 2019
Abstract
Vibrational spectroscopies, including infrared and Raman techniques, are important tools for the characterization of chemical composition, molecular structures, and chain orientation under mechanical deformation of polymeric materials. The development of fiber-optic-based spectrometers has broadened the use of vibrational spectroscopy for process monitoring in [...] Read more.
Vibrational spectroscopies, including infrared and Raman techniques, are important tools for the characterization of chemical composition, molecular structures, and chain orientation under mechanical deformation of polymeric materials. The development of fiber-optic-based spectrometers has broadened the use of vibrational spectroscopy for process monitoring in various fields including polymerization, curing, and manufacturing processes. Combined with chemometrics, near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy is now recognized as one of the most important techniques for polymer analyses. Infrared and Raman studies also offer invaluable means for the analysis of inorganic particles used as reinforcing fillers for polymers. The characterization of surface species and the nature of interfacial bonding between the organic and inorganic phases are important issues for the understanding of composite properties. Infrared spectroscopy is particularly convenient for the detection and analysis of hydroxyl groups on filler surfaces, and Raman spectroscopy is particularly well suited for the study of carbon-based materials. In both techniques, polymer-filler interactions can be evidenced through frequency shifts or width changes of bands associated with vibrational modes of functional groups of either macromolecular chains or filler particles. Selected examples of application of infrared and Raman spectroscopies illustrate their potential for monitoring polymer processes, measuring polymer orientation, and characterizing polymer composites. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Spectroscopic Techniques for Polymers and Polymer Composites)
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