Special Issue "Chitosan Nanoparticles in Drug Delivery"

A special issue of Pharmaceutics (ISSN 1999-4923).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 March 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Ellen Wasan
Website
Guest Editor
University of Saskatchewan, College of Pharmacy and Nutrition, Saskatoon, Canada
Interests: lipid-based drug delivery; lipid nanoparticles; polymer nanoparticles; vaccine adjuvants; immunology; oncology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Chitosan is a polysaccharide derived by deactylation of the naturally occurring polymer chitin, which occurs in crustacean shells. Chitosan is widely available commercially in various forms, and its chemistry lends itself to functionalization. Due to its excellent biocompatibility, biodegradability and versatility, chitosan has been applied to diverse drug delivery systems for nearly every route of administration. The close relationship between the physical properties of the specific chitosan polymer used and its performance in drug delivery systems requires that we gain further understanding not only of advanced fabrication methodologies and key physical characterization parameters but also of biological interactions with chitosan at the cellular and systems level. This Special Issue of Pharmaceutics will give readers an overview and considerable depth on the current state of chitosan nanoparticle technology, application and analysis.

Dr. Ellen Wasan
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • nanoparticle fabrication
  • nanoparticle characterization
  • nanoparticle toxicology
  • controlled drug release
  • smart polymers
  • biocompatibility
  • targeted drug delivery
  • gene therapy
  • theranostics

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Optimization of Thiolated Chitosan Nanoparticles for the Enhancement of in Vivo Hypoglycemic Efficacy of Sitagliptin in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats
Pharmaceutics 2020, 12(4), 300; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics12040300 - 26 Mar 2020
Abstract
Sitagliptin (SGN) is an antidiabetic drug used for treatment of diabetes mellitus type II. The objectives of this study were to formulate SGN in form of thiolated chitosan (TC) nanoparticles to enhance the mucoadhesion properties of SGN to the gastrointestinal tract, prolong drug [...] Read more.
Sitagliptin (SGN) is an antidiabetic drug used for treatment of diabetes mellitus type II. The objectives of this study were to formulate SGN in form of thiolated chitosan (TC) nanoparticles to enhance the mucoadhesion properties of SGN to the gastrointestinal tract, prolong drug release, decrease side effects, and enhance patient compliance. Seventeen batches of SGN-TC nanoparticles were designed by Box-Behnken design and prepared using the ionic gelation method using tripolyphosphate (TPP) as crosslinking agent. The prepared formulations were evaluated for particle size, entrapment efficiency %, and in vitro drug release. Based on the results of optimization, three formulations (F1–F3) were prepared with different drug polymer ratios (1:1, 1:2, and 1:3). The mucoadhesion study and in vivo hypoglycemic activity of three formulations were evaluated in comparison to free SGN in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. The seventeen SGN-TC nanoparticles showed small particle sizes, high entrapment efficiency, and prolonged drug release. The concentration of TC polymers had highest effect on these responses. The percentage of SGN–TC nanoparticles adhered to tissue was increased and the release was prolonged as the concentration of TC polymer increased (F3 > F2 > F1). The hypoglycemic effect of SGN-TC nanoparticles was significantly higher than resulted by free SGN. It was concluded that TC nanoparticles had the ability to enhance the mucoadhesion properties of SGN and prolong the drug release. SGN-TC nanoparticles significantly reduced plasma glucose levels compared to free SGN in STZ-induced diabetic rats. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chitosan Nanoparticles in Drug Delivery)
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Open AccessArticle
Fabrication of Ion-Crosslinking Aminochitosan Nanoparticles for Encapsulation and Slow Release of Curcumin
Pharmaceutics 2019, 11(11), 584; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics11110584 - 07 Nov 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Curcumin (Cur) has anticancer activities but has poor stability, which can be improved using carrier materials. In this study, chitosan was aminated to increase the number of amino groups on its surface, modified with folic acid (FA), and then made into nanoparticles by [...] Read more.
Curcumin (Cur) has anticancer activities but has poor stability, which can be improved using carrier materials. In this study, chitosan was aminated to increase the number of amino groups on its surface, modified with folic acid (FA), and then made into nanoparticles by ionic crosslinking. Owing to ion interaction, the negatively charged, non-toxic tripolyphosphate (TPP) interacted with the positively charged amino group on the aminated chitosan (AmCS) surface, producing FA-AmCS-TPP nanoparticles, which were then characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometry (FT-IR), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Their small particle size (175.2 ± 0.99 nm) and good surface positive potential (+42.4 mV) are beneficial for carrying antitumor drugs. We subsequently investigated whether coating of Cur by AmCS allows slow drug release by FA-AmCS-TPP nanoparticles in different pH environments, and estimated the Cur loading efficiency (EE-Cur). Our results showed that the cumulative release rate of Cur at 48 h was 56.2%, and that the EE-Cur reached 94.26 ± 0.91% with nanoparticles composed of 0.10 g AmCS, 10.0 mg FA, 10.0 mg TPP, and 15.0 mg Cur. Additionally, cytotoxicity experiments showed that the Cur/FA-AmCS-TPP nanoparticles had good targeting ability for tumor cells. Therefore, the non-toxic targeted composite nanoparticles had potential as a new antitumor agent that can overcome the limitations of Cur. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chitosan Nanoparticles in Drug Delivery)
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