Special Issue "Recent Advances in Metabolomics and Applications in Chronic Diseases"

A special issue of Pathophysiology (ISSN 1873-149X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2021) | Viewed by 2601

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Dimitris Tsoukalas
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
European Institute of Nutritional Medicine (E.I.Nu.M.), 00198 Rome, Italy
Interests: metabolomics, autoimmune diseases, chronic diseases, insulin resistance, oxidative stress, microbiome, micronutrient deficiencies, precision medicine
Ms Evangelia Sarandi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Laboratory of Toxicology and Forensic Sciences, Medical School, University of Crete, 71003 Heraklion, Greece
Interests: metabolomics, chronic diseases, Hashimoto’s disease, psoriasis, organic acids, fatty acids, GC-MS, inflammation, biomarkers, predictive modelling

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Metabolomics, the comprehensive study of metabolites, has emerged as a novel tool of Precision Medicine to identify predictive biomarkers, patient stratification, selection and optimization of treatment and real-time monitoring of overall health. Metabolites are the end products of the genetic information flow, reflecting the cellular state and function in response to gene expression and non-genetic stimuli that shape the phenotype. In the last years, it is becoming apparent that chronic diseases or non-communicable diseases are mostly caused by non-genetic factors. Therefore, metabolomics has gained increasing scientific attention as a tool to investigate the metabolic background of chronic diseases and identify potential biomarkers. Insulin resistance, inflammation and oxidative stress are known intermediate metabolic risk factors of chronic diseases. Thus, a closer look at the metabolic networks associated with these factors would deepen our knowledge of the etiology of chronic diseases. Also, mapping the disturbed metabolic networks of chronic diseases through case-control and longitudinal studies will help identify predictive biomarkers and the development of risk calculators.

For this special issue, we invite original research and review articles focused on the metabolic background of chronic diseases evaluated using metabolomic techniques. Besides, we seek submissions stressing the challenges and future perspectives regarding the application of metabolomics in clinical practice. With this special issue, we aim to address key biological questions regarding the etiology of chronic diseases, highlight innovative findings on the metabolic disturbances of chronic diseases and critically discuss the next step towards integrating metabolomics into clinical practice.

We are looking forward to your contributions to this Special Issue.

Prof. Dr. Dimitris Tsoukalas
Ms Evangelia Sarandi

Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Pathophysiology is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Metabolomics
  • chronic diseases
  • metabolic network
  • insulin resistance
  • oxidative stress
  • inflammation
  • biomarkers
  • clinical practice

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Review

Jump to: Other

Review
Metabolomics and EMT Markers of Breast Cancer: A Crosstalk and Future Perspective
Pathophysiology 2022, 29(2), 200-222; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathophysiology29020017 (registering DOI) - 27 May 2022
Viewed by 91
Abstract
Cancer cells undergo transient EMT and MET phenomena or vice versa, along with the parallel interplay of various markers, often correlated as the determining factor in decoding metabolic profiling of breast cancers. Moreover, various cancer signaling pathways and metabolic changes occurring in breast [...] Read more.
Cancer cells undergo transient EMT and MET phenomena or vice versa, along with the parallel interplay of various markers, often correlated as the determining factor in decoding metabolic profiling of breast cancers. Moreover, various cancer signaling pathways and metabolic changes occurring in breast cancer cells modulate the expression of such markers to varying extents. The existing research completed so far considers the expression of such markers as determinants regulating the invasiveness and survival of breast cancer cells. Therefore, this manuscript is crosstalk among the expression levels of such markers and their correlation in regulating the aggressiveness and invasiveness of breast cancer. We also attempted to cover the possible EMT-based metabolic targets to retard migration and invasion of breast cancer. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Metabolomics and Applications in Chronic Diseases)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Other

Jump to: Review

Protocol
A Clinical Trial for the Identification of Metabolic Biomarkers in Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis and in Psoriasis: Study Protocol
Pathophysiology 2021, 28(2), 291-306; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathophysiology28020019 - 14 Jun 2021
Viewed by 1452
Abstract
Hashimoto’s thyroiditis and psoriasis are inflammatory disorders that significantly impact patients’ quality of life, stressing the need for novel biomarkers of early diagnosis. This randomized clinical trial (NCT04693936) aims to identify Hashimoto’s thyroiditis’ and psoriasis’ metabolic biomarkers and to investigate the effect of [...] Read more.
Hashimoto’s thyroiditis and psoriasis are inflammatory disorders that significantly impact patients’ quality of life, stressing the need for novel biomarkers of early diagnosis. This randomized clinical trial (NCT04693936) aims to identify Hashimoto’s thyroiditis’ and psoriasis’ metabolic biomarkers and to investigate the effect of environmental factors on the disease-related metabolic imprint and quality of life. Patients with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, patients with psoriasis, and healthy individuals aged 18–60 will be recruited, enrolled according to eligibility criteria (medical history, clinical thyroid markers and the PASI score) and randomized to two groups. The intervention group will receive a combination of nutraceuticals for 6 months as part of a Mediterranean diet, and the control group will follow their usual diet. Data will be collected at baseline and the end of the study, including metabolite levels, lifestyle and anthropometric measurements, adherence to the Mediterranean diet (through the Mediterranean Diet Score) and disease-specific quality of life (through the Thyroid Patient Report Outcome for Hashimoto’s group, and the Dermatology Life Quality Index for the psoriasis group). This study will investigate metabolic biomarkers and related changes in Hashimoto’s thyroiditis and psoriasis and evaluate the association of metabolic changes with dietary factors and quality of life. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Metabolomics and Applications in Chronic Diseases)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop