Special Issue "Human Fungal Pathogens"

A special issue of Pathogens (ISSN 2076-0817).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2015).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Ying-Lien Chen
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Plant Pathology and Microbiology, National Taiwan University, 10617 Taipei, Taiwan
Interests: antifungal drug development; human fungal pathogens (Candida, Cryptococcus, Aspergillus); plant fungal and bacterial pathogens (Fusarium and Streptomyces); biological control
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues

About 1.2 billion people worldwide are estimated to suffer from fungal infections and these infections have significantly increased in recent years due to the emergence of immunocompromised patients, such as those with AIDS and cancer. Among them, Candida, Cryptococcus, Aspergillus, and Fusarium are frequently isolated and associated with high mortality if not appropriately treated. However, current antifungal drugs, such as azoles, polyenes, echinocandins, and flucytosine are not sufficient to combat fungal infections. New compounds and novel formulations/combinations of existing antifungal drugs are under development and can potentially reduce fungal infections. In order to develop novel antifungal drugs, studying the basic mechanisms of microbial pathogenesis is pivotal. Therefore, we would like to create a Special Issue on “Human Fungal Pathogens”, focusing on antifungal drug development and microbial pathogenesis. We invite you to submit a research or review article related to these fields of fungal pathogens, and we are looking forward to your key contributions.

Dr. Ying-Lien Chen
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Pathogens is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.



Keywords

  • Candida
  • Cryptococcus
  • Aspergillus
  • Fusarium
  • Antifungal drug development
  • Microbial pathogenesis

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Review

Open AccessReview
The Host’s Reply to Candida Biofilm
Pathogens 2016, 5(1), 33; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens5010033 - 18 Mar 2016
Cited by 20
Abstract
Candida spp. are among the most common nosocomial fungal pathogens and are notorious for their propensity toward biofilm formation. When growing on a medical device or mucosal surface, these organisms reside as communities embedded in a protective matrix, resisting host defenses. The host [...] Read more.
Candida spp. are among the most common nosocomial fungal pathogens and are notorious for their propensity toward biofilm formation. When growing on a medical device or mucosal surface, these organisms reside as communities embedded in a protective matrix, resisting host defenses. The host responds to Candida biofilm by depositing a variety of proteins that become incorporated into the biofilm matrix. Compared to free-floating Candida, leukocytes are less effective against Candida within a biofilm. This review highlights recent advances describing the host’s response to Candida biofilms using ex vivo and in vivo models of mucosal and device-associated biofilm infections. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Human Fungal Pathogens)
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Open AccessReview
Calcineurin Orchestrates Hyphal Growth, Septation, Drug Resistance and Pathogenesis of Aspergillus fumigatus: Where Do We Go from Here?
Pathogens 2015, 4(4), 883-893; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens4040883 - 16 Dec 2015
Cited by 13
Abstract
Studies on fungal pathogens belonging to the ascomycota phylum are critical given the ubiquity and frequency with which these fungi cause infections in humans. Among these species, Aspergillus fumigatus causes invasive aspergillosis, a leading cause of death in immunocompromised patients. Fundamental to A. [...] Read more.
Studies on fungal pathogens belonging to the ascomycota phylum are critical given the ubiquity and frequency with which these fungi cause infections in humans. Among these species, Aspergillus fumigatus causes invasive aspergillosis, a leading cause of death in immunocompromised patients. Fundamental to A. fumigatus pathogenesis is hyphal growth. However, the precise mechanisms underlying hyphal growth and virulence are poorly understood. Over the past 10 years, our research towards the identification of molecular targets responsible for hyphal growth, drug resistance and virulence led to the elucidation of calcineurin as a key signaling molecule governing these processes. In this review, we summarize our salient findings on the significance of calcineurin for hyphal growth and septation in A. fumigatus and propose future perspectives on exploiting this pathway for designing new fungal-specific therapeutics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Human Fungal Pathogens)
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