Special Issue "Ticks and Tick Borne Diseases Surveillance"

A special issue of Pathogens (ISSN 2076-0817).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Paweł Stefanoff

Guest Editor
Department of Zoonotic, Food- and Waterborne Infections, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway
Interests: epidemiology of vaccine-preventable diseases; epidemiology of vector-borne diseases; host-pathogen interactions during arboviral infections; health preparedness - from global perspective to local solutions; organization of vaccination programmes; field epidemiology training

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Tick-borne diseases are an emerging Public Health and Veterinary Medicine problem which is neither appropriately recognised nor well controlled. To understand the tick-borne diseases burden and dynamics we need to rely on routinely collected surveillance data, if available. The existing systems are, however, not efficient in monitoring the disease risk, because they rely on the laboratory diagnostic practices in a given territory. On the other hand, the tick-borne disease risk in a given area depends on complex interactions between the pathogens, the tick populations, their hosts, and human behaviours. Relying on passive reporting of laboratory-confirmed cases does not provide reliable information on risk. We need to identify more efficient ways to systematically collect information on tick-borne disease risk, intergrating multi-sectoral approaches and tools. In this exciting era of dynamic development of diagnostic methods, IT hardware and software capacities, increasing integration of multi-sectoral databases, we can develop new ideas on how to approach to tick-borne disease surveillance, to better respond to existing and future threats. This Special Issue will equally value evaluation of existing surveillance systems and new innovative surveillance approaches.

Dr. Paweł Stefanoff
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Surveillance
  • Tick-borne diseases
  • Tick-borne encephalitis
  • Lyme borreliosis
  • Tick-borne rickettsial disease
  • Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever
  • Spotted Fever
  • Ehrlichiosis
  • Anaplasmosis
  • Babesiosis

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Epidemiology of Tick-Borne Encephalitis (TBE) in Germany, 2001–2018
Pathogens 2019, 8(2), 42; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens8020042 - 29 Mar 2019
Cited by 11
Abstract
We reviewed tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) surveillance and epidemiology in Germany, as these underlie public health recommendations, foremost vaccination. We performed descriptive analyses of notification data (2001–2018, n = 6063) according to region, demographics and clinical manifestations and calculated incidence trends using negative binomial [...] Read more.
We reviewed tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) surveillance and epidemiology in Germany, as these underlie public health recommendations, foremost vaccination. We performed descriptive analyses of notification data (2001–2018, n = 6063) according to region, demographics and clinical manifestations and calculated incidence trends using negative binomial regression. Risk areas were defined based on incidence in administrative districts. Most cases (89%) occurred in the federal states of Baden-Wurttemberg and Bavaria, where annual TBE incidence fluctuated markedly between 0.7–2.0 cases/100,000 inhabitants. A slight but significantly increasing temporal trend was observed from 2001–2018 (age-adjusted incidence rate ratio (IRR) 1.02 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.01–1.04)), primarily driven by high case numbers in 2017–2018. Mean incidence was highest in 40–69-year-olds and in males. More males (23.7%) than females (18.0%, p = 0.02) had severe disease (encephalitis or myelitis), which increased with age, as did case-fatality (0.4% overall; 2.1% among ≥70-year-olds). Risk areas increased from 129 districts in 2007 to 161 in 2019. Expansion occurred mainly within existent southern endemic areas, with slower contiguous north-eastern and patchy north-western spread. Median vaccination coverage at school entry in risk areas in 2016–2017 ranged from 20%–41% in 4 states. Increasing TBE vaccine uptake is an urgent priority, particularly in high-incidence risk areas. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ticks and Tick Borne Diseases Surveillance)
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Open AccessArticle
Serological Survey of Ehrlichia canis and Anaplasma phagocytophilum in Dogs from Central Italy: An Update (2013–2017)
Pathogens 2019, 8(1), 3; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens8010003 - 04 Jan 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
Ehrlichia canis and Anaplasma phagocytophilum are tick-borne bacteria of veterinary concern. Indirect immunofluorescent assay was carried out to detect antibodies against E. canis and A. phagocytophilum in 1026 owned dogs living in Central Italy during the period 2013–2017. One hundred and eighty-six (18.12%) [...] Read more.
Ehrlichia canis and Anaplasma phagocytophilum are tick-borne bacteria of veterinary concern. Indirect immunofluorescent assay was carried out to detect antibodies against E. canis and A. phagocytophilum in 1026 owned dogs living in Central Italy during the period 2013–2017. One hundred and eighty-six (18.12%) dogs were positive for at least one pathogen and 14 (1.36%) for both agents. More in detail, 166 (16.18%) samples were positive for E. canis and 34 (3.31%) for A. phagocytophilum. No statistically significant differences in the seroprevalence values related to gender were detected, whereas the highest rate to E. canis occurred in animals aged more than 10 years. Mean seroprevalence values for both E. canis and A. phagocytophilum detected in 2014 and 2015 were statistically higher with respect to other years. Even though dogs’ owners are informed about the risk of pet infections by tick-borne pathogens and prophylaxis against ticks is often executed, E. canis and A. phagocytophilum are still present and infect the canine population in Central Italy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ticks and Tick Borne Diseases Surveillance)
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