Special Issue "Soilborne Plant Pathogens"

A special issue of Pathogens (ISSN 2076-0817).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Xiangming Xu
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Pest and Pathogen Ecology, NIAB East Malling Research (EMR), East Malling ME19 6BJ, UK
Interests: plant disease epidemiology and management; microbial ecology; population modelling/biology
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Soil microflora consists of microorganisms that are beneficial, neutral or harmful to plants. Crops are attacked by many pathogenic microorganisms, primarily from fungi and oomycetes, necessitating stringent disease control measures. Well-known soilborne pathogens include Phytopathora spp., Pythium spp., Fusarium spp. and Verticillium spp. Soil fumigation with broad-spectrum pesticides used to be one of main disease control measures. However, due to its negative impact on soil microbiota and the environment in general, such practice has recently been banned in many countries. As a result, managing soilborne disease has become even more important. This is particularly true for some complex disease syndromes that are known to associate with several soilborne pathogens but without clear identification of causal agent(s), for instance replant disease and yield syndromes where crop production potential is significantly reduced with continuous production at the same location. Indeed, the difficulty of managing soilborne pathogens is one of the reasons for an increase in some crops being grown in substrate. Moreover, soilborne diseases are often much influenced by soil conditions, including the complex resident microflora, making them difficult to study in situ. Sustainable intensification of agriculture requires effective management of soilborne pathogens. In order to manage these soilborne pathogens, before growers can apply appropriate control measures in a timely manner, we need to know what pathogens are present, spatial inoculum distribution, and soil suppressiveness. Of course, breeding cultivars with durable resistance remains a long term goal to combat diseases.

Recent advances in “-omics” science have offered new avenues to study complex microbial interactions in soils. These techniques have now been used by researchers to gain more understanding of biology of the pathogens, interactions between the pathogens and the host, and ‘soil health’ in the context for crop production. This knowledge may help us to design new management strategies.

Prof. Xiangming Xu
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • Inoculum quantification
  • Epidemiology
  • Host resistance
  • Soil health
  • Soil/rhizosphere microbiome
  • Soil amendment
  • Biofumigation
  • Biocontrol

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Non-Synergistic Effect of Trichoderma harzianum and Glomus spp. in Reducing Infection of Fusarium Wilt in Banana
Pathogens 2019, 8(2), 43; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens8020043 - 31 Mar 2019
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1754
Abstract
Philippine banana is currently threatened by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense Tropical Race 4 (FocR4). This study investigated the use of Trichoderma harzianum pre-treated with Glomus spp, as a means of managing Fusarium wilt on young ‘Lakatan’ banana seedlings. Results showed that Glomus [...] Read more.
Philippine banana is currently threatened by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense Tropical Race 4 (FocR4). This study investigated the use of Trichoderma harzianum pre-treated with Glomus spp, as a means of managing Fusarium wilt on young ‘Lakatan’ banana seedlings. Results showed that Glomus applied basally significantly improved banana seedling growth with increased increment in plant height and pseudostem diameter and heavier root weight. The application of Glomus spp. alone offered 100% protection to the ‘Lakatan’ seedlings against FocR4 as indicated by the absence of the wilting symptom. A combination of T. harzianum and Glomus spp. also gave significant effect against Fusarium wilt through delayed disease progression in the seedlings but was not synergistic. Competitive effects were suspected when application of the two biological control agents on banana roots was done simultaneously. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Soilborne Plant Pathogens)
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Article
Effect of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi on Pratylenchus penetrans Infestation in Apple Seedlings under Greenhouse Conditions
Pathogens 2018, 7(4), 76; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens7040076 - 21 Sep 2018
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1771
Abstract
A major problem in fruit cultivation in Flanders is replant disease due to a lack of uncultivated soils available for new plantings. Replant disease can cause poor growth and affect time to full production, however Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi (AMF) can prove their usefulness [...] Read more.
A major problem in fruit cultivation in Flanders is replant disease due to a lack of uncultivated soils available for new plantings. Replant disease can cause poor growth and affect time to full production, however Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi (AMF) can prove their usefulness with regard to these problems. To further investigate the effect of AMF on nematodes, different AMF species were amended to potted apple seedlings in the presence of the nematode Pratylenchus penetrans. Generally, apple seedlings grew better in the presence of nematodes when mycorrhiza were inoculated into the soil. Moreover, a positive correlation (R2 ≥ 0.88) was found between the percentage root length colonization of the roots of apple seedlings, by AMF species, and nematode reduction in the soil of the seedlings. Indigenous AMF could colonize the roots of apple seedlings the most efficiently, resulting in a higher biocontrol effect. Besides, a synergistic effect was observed when two AMF strains were applied together leading to a significant growth response of the seedlings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Soilborne Plant Pathogens)
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