Parasites: Epidemiology, Treatment and Control: 2nd Edition

A special issue of Pathogens (ISSN 2076-0817). This special issue belongs to the section "Parasitic Pathogens".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2024 | Viewed by 2068

Special Issue Editors

Department of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg, Denmark
Interests: helminth infections; anthelmintic drug resistance; host–parasite interaction; anthelmintic drug discovery; biomarkers for host resistance to parasites; sustainable parasite control strategies
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Department of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg, Denmark
Interests: helminth infections; protozoan infections; parasite–nutrition interactions; gut health and microbiota; nutraceuticals and nonchemical approaches to controlling gut pathogens
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Parasites are one of the most significant health and welfare concerns for humans and animals and cause losses of billions of dollars annually in terms of reduced productivity and treatment and control costs. Parasitic diseases are caused by a wide variety of endo-(helminths, protozoa) and ectoparasites (for example ticks, lice, and flies) in both humans and animals. Parasites have been a primary focus of research in production and companion animals due to the higher rates of morbidity and mortality associated with certain parasitic infections along with reduced farm profitability in the case of production animals. In addition, parasitic zoonoses are one of the major public health concerns throughout the world; for example, soil-transmitted helminths infect more than 1.5 billion people (24% of the world population) worldwide. The treatment of parasitic infections has heavily relied on the use of antiparasitic drugs; however, rapidly developing drug resistance has been a big challenge. With fewer success stories in using vaccines against parasites, the development of sustainable control strategies has been challenging. Parasitology researchers are conducting extensive research to understand parasite biology, the prevalence and transmission patterns of parasitic diseases in the face of climate change, and the pathogenesis of parasitic infections in addition to developing sustainable treatment and control strategies.

Therefore, in this Special Issue of MDPI Pathogens, we invite parasitology researchers to submit high-quality research publications, including in the form of reviews and original research articles, within the area of epidemiology, treatment, and control of parasitic diseases in both humans and animals across the globe. This Special Issue will provide a platform to readers seeking a comprehensive overview and the latest knowledge and information regarding the diversity of parasitology research.

Dr. Ali Raza
Dr. Andrew Richard Williams
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Pathogens is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • endoparasites
  • ectoparasites
  • zoonoses
  • epidemiology
  • treatment
  • control

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Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

11 pages, 1086 KiB  
Article
Epidemiology of Ocular Thelaziosis in Domestic Dogs in Beijing
Pathogens 2024, 13(2), 166; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens13020166 - 12 Feb 2024
Viewed by 525
Abstract
Thelazia callipaeda is a zoonotic parasitic nematode that lives in the ocular conjunctival sac of domestic and wild carnivores, lagomorphs, and humans, with Phortica spp. as its intermediate host. At present, the important role that domestic dogs play in thelaziosis has been studied [...] Read more.
Thelazia callipaeda is a zoonotic parasitic nematode that lives in the ocular conjunctival sac of domestic and wild carnivores, lagomorphs, and humans, with Phortica spp. as its intermediate host. At present, the important role that domestic dogs play in thelaziosis has been studied in many countries. However, Beijing, which is the first city in China to experience human thelaziosis, has not yet conducted a comprehensive epidemiological analysis of the disease. In this study, we analyzed risk factors (region, season, age, sex, breed, size, living environment, diet, country park travel history, immunization history, anthelmintic treatment history, and ocular clinical symptoms) associated with the prevalence of thelaziosis in domestic dogs in Beijing. The overall prevalence of T. callipaeda in the study area was 3.17% (102/3215 domestic dogs; 95% CI 2.57–3.78%). The results of the risk factor analysis showed that thelaziosis in domestic dogs from Beijing was significantly correlated with regional distribution, seasonal distribution, country park travel history, and anthelmintic treatment history (p < 0.05). In summer and autumn, domestic dogs living in mountainous areas, with a history of country park travel and without deworming were 4.164, 2.382, and 1.438 times more infected with T. callipaeda than those living in plain areas without a history of country park travel and with a history of deworming (OR = 4.164, OR = 2.382, OR = 1.438, respectively). T. callipaeda-infected domestic dogs did not always show any ocular clinical symptoms, while symptomatic domestic dogs were mainly characterized by moderate symptoms. The results indicate that in summer and autumn, preventive anthelmintic treatment should be strengthened for domestic dogs with a country park travel history or those living in mountain areas. At the same time, we should be vigilant about taking domestic dogs to play in country parks or mountainous areas during summer and autumn because this may pose a potential risk of the owner being infected with T. callipaeda. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Parasites: Epidemiology, Treatment and Control: 2nd Edition)
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15 pages, 3272 KiB  
Article
Epidemiological Investigation of Tick-Borne Bacterial Pathogens in Domestic Animals from the Qinghai–Tibetan Plateau Area, China
Pathogens 2024, 13(1), 86; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens13010086 - 19 Jan 2024
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Abstract
The Qinghai–Tibetan Plateau area (QTPA) features a unique environment that has witnessed the selective breeding of diverse breeds of domestic livestock exhibiting remarkable adaptability. Nevertheless, Anaplasma spp., Rickettsia spp., Coxiella spp., and Borrelia spp. represent tick-borne bacterial pathogens that pose a global threat [...] Read more.
The Qinghai–Tibetan Plateau area (QTPA) features a unique environment that has witnessed the selective breeding of diverse breeds of domestic livestock exhibiting remarkable adaptability. Nevertheless, Anaplasma spp., Rickettsia spp., Coxiella spp., and Borrelia spp. represent tick-borne bacterial pathogens that pose a global threat and have substantial impacts on both human and animal health, as well as on the economy of animal husbandry within the Qinghai–Tibetan plateau area. In this study, a total of 428 samples were systematically collected from 20 distinct areas within the Qinghai Plateau. The samples included 62 ticks and 366 blood samples obtained from diverse animal species to detect the presence of Anaplasma spp., Rickettsia spp., Coxiella spp., and Borrelia spp. The prevalence of infection in this study was determined as follows: Anaplasma bovis accounted for 16.4% (70/428), A. capra for 4.7% (20/428), A. ovis for 5.8% (25/428), Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato for 6.3% (27/428), Coxiella burnetii for 0.7% (3/428), and Rickettsia spp. for 0.5% (2/428). Notably, no cases of A. marginale and A. phagocytophilum infections were observed in this study. The findings revealed an elevated presence of these pathogens in Tibetan sheep and goats, with no infections detected in yaks, Bactrian camels, donkeys, and horses. To the best of our knowledge, this study represents the first investigation of tick-borne bacterial pathogens infecting goats, cattle, horses, and donkeys within the Qinghai Plateau of the Qinghai–Tibetan Plateau area. Consequently, our findings contribute valuable insights into the distribution and genetic diversity of Anaplasma spp., Rickettsia spp., Coxiella spp., and Borrelia spp. within China. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Parasites: Epidemiology, Treatment and Control: 2nd Edition)
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