Special Issue "Magnetic Nanomaterials as Theranostic Platform in Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Marco Cordani
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Nanomedicine, Madrid Institute for Advanced Study in Nanoscience, Madrid 28039, Spain
Interests: nanomedicine; cancer therapy; autophagy; ROS; nanoparticles; chemotherapy
Dr. Ana Espinosa
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Nanomedicine, Madrid Institute for Advanced Study in Nanoscience, Madrid 28039, Spain
Interests: Magnetic hyperthermia; photothermia; magnetic nanoparticles; plasmonic nanoparticles; nanobiodegradation; multifunctional nanostructures

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This multidisciplinary Special Issue of Nanomaterials focuses on the application of magnetic nanomaterials in cancer treatment and diagnosis and encourages basic and translational scientists working in a related field to submit original research articles and review articles. Today, radiotherapy and chemotherapy are the principal medical therapeutic approaches against cancer. However, the efficacy of these treatments is often limited by a number of unwanted side-effects associated with nonselective and unspecific cytotoxicity. In recent years, nanotechnology has attracted significant interests in cancer therapeutics because of its huge potential to offer many innovative tools to overcome the problems arising from present chemotherapy and radiotherapy approaches. The intersection between the fields of chemistry, physics, and material sciences has created theranostics nanomaterials which are defined as the combination of therapeutic and diagnostic agents within a single platform and are expected to improve the efficacy of treatment of many tumors resistant to traditional therapeutic approaches, as well as to provide novel diagnostic tools. In particular, magnetic nanoparticles, because of their unique physical, chemical, mechanical, and optical properties, have intrinsic cytotoxicity and/or enhance the efficacy of standard chemotherapies. Moreover, magnetic nanoparticles are used as nanocarriers, since they can be easily modified in order to deliver therapeutic molecules, such as drugs, proteins, or nucleic acids. Important advantages of these therapeutic nanostructures concern, as well, their external controllability by different stimuli in order to produce a cytotoxic effect through the delivery of local heating by the application of an external magnetic field or optical near infrared radiation depending on their composition and physical properties. These functions can be utilized for therapeutic hyperthermia of cancer but also for controlled release of cancer drugs through the application of an external magnetic field. Finally, magnetic nanomaterials can also be exploited to favor the delivery of immune agents and can represent a valid therapeutic tool to bypass the obstacles currently encountered in cancer immunotherapy. These innovative biomedical applications are currently exploited in a variety of clinical trials and in the near future may represent a major improvement in the therapy of cancer. In this regard, magnetic nanoparticles can be used as platform materials for theranostics application by offering advantages and opportunities as drug delivery systems and nanodiagnostics, decreasing the side-effects of standard therapies. We aim to receive submissions addressed on recent advances in the broad and fascinating field of functional magnetic nanomaterials for therapeutic and diagnostic purposes.

Dr. Marco Cordani
Dr. Ana Espinosa
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • cancer treatment
  • magnetic nanomaterials for drug delivery in cancer
  • therapeutic nucleic acids
  • magnetic and photothermal therapy in cancer
  • magnetic nanomaterials for diagnostic applications
  • modulation of immune response by magnetic nanoparticles
  • modulation of autophagy
  • regulation of oxidative stress
  • modulation of EMT and fibrosis

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Hyperthermia, Cytotoxicity, and Cellular Uptake Properties of Manganese and Zinc Ferrite Magnetic Nanoparticles Synthesized by a Polyol-Mediated Process
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(10), 1489; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9101489 - 18 Oct 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
Manganese and zinc ferrite magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were successfully synthesized
using the polyol method in ethylene glycol and were found to have high saturation magnetization
values (90–95 emu/g at 4 K) when formed by ~30-nm crystallites assembled in an ~80-nm multicore
structure. Hyperthermia [...] Read more.
Manganese and zinc ferrite magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were successfully synthesized
using the polyol method in ethylene glycol and were found to have high saturation magnetization
values (90–95 emu/g at 4 K) when formed by ~30-nm crystallites assembled in an ~80-nm multicore
structure. Hyperthermia data revealed a sigmoidal dependence of the specific absorption rate (SAR)
on the alternating magnetic field (AMF) amplitude, with remarkable saturation SAR values in water
of ~1200 W/gFe+Mn and ~800 W/gFe+Zn for the Mn and Zn ferrites, respectively. The immobilization
of the MNPs in a solid matrix reduced the maximum SAR values by ~300 W/gFe+Mn, Zn for both
ferrites. The alignment of the MNPs in a uniform static magnetic field, before their immobilization
in a solid matrix, significantly increased their heating performance. Toxicity assays performed in
four cell lines revealed a lower toxicity for the Mn ferrites, while in the case of the Zn ferrites, only
~50% of cells were viable upon their incubation for 24 h with 0.2 mg/mL of MNPs. Cellular uptake
experiments revealed that both MNPs entered the cells in a time-dependent manner, as they were
found initially in endosomes and later in the cytosol. All of the studied cell lines were more sensitive
to the ZnFe2O4 MNPs. Full article
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