Special Issue "Biomimetic Nanomaterials"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 18 May 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Francesco Filippini
Website
Guest Editor
Dipartimento di Biologia, Universita degli Studi di Padova, Padua, Italy
Interests: synthetic biology; biotechnology; nanoscience; bioinformatics; regenerative medicine; biocatalysis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The past five decades have seen studies in biology, biotechnology, pharmacology and medicine focusing on genetic and epigenetic determinants and, in the most recent years, the overall approach has moved towards a genome/proteome-wide scale. However, it has become more and more evident that both micro and macro environmental signals play a pivotal role in co-regulating cell fate and differentiation, tissue and organ development, thus being involved in physiological pathways and—when impaired—in the mechanisms underlying diseases. Cells are able to sense the nano-topographical features of the substrate they are growing in/on, and a huge number of biochemical cues are involved in the fine-tuning of their differentiation and migration. Tissue development and shaping are driven—in addition to genetic signals—by a complex environmental code consisting of attractive/repulsive interactions leading to signaling cascades and cross-talk. Therefore, developing biomimetic signals is of great help in both (i) basic science studies aimed at elucidating, by fine dissection of motifs and functions, molecular and cellular pathways; and (ii) applied science projects providing humans with enhanced tools for theranostics and drug delivery, regenerative medicine and vaccine development, bioremediation and green chemistry. Nanomaterials are the elective starting point for biomimetics because of their nano-scale and evidence that they can be combined in various formulations to improve and better mimic natural features, providing the scientists with reliable tools for synthetic biology and nanotechnology approaches to basic and translational research.   

This Special Issue will attempt to cover recent advances in the design and use of biomimetic nanomaterials in multiple fields of application, e.g. the development of biomimetic scaffolds for regenerative medicine, nanomaterial-based biosensors and antimicrobials, biomimetic nanoparticle vaccines and nano-carriers for drug delivery, including front-end approaches to bioremediation and green chemistry. We welcome submissions of both original research papers and reviews on this topic. 

Prof. Dr. Francesco Filippini
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • biomimetic scaffolds and regenerative medicine
  • biomimetic nano-carriers and drug delivery
  • biomimetic materials in theranostics
  • nanomaterial-based biosensors
  • nanomaterials and bioimaging
  • antimicrobial nanomaterials
  • biomimetic nanoparticle vaccines
  • nanomaterials and biocatalysis

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Commitment of Autologous Human Multipotent Stem Cells on Biomimetic Poly-L-Lactic Acid-Based Scaffolds Is Strongly Influenced by Structure and Concentration of Carbon Nanomaterial
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(3), 415; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10030415 - 27 Feb 2020
Abstract
Nanocomposite scaffolds combining carbon nanomaterials (CNMs) with a biocompatible matrix are able to favor the neuronal differentiation and growth of a number of cell types, because they mimic neural-tissue nanotopography and/or conductivity. We performed comparative analysis of biomimetic scaffolds with poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) [...] Read more.
Nanocomposite scaffolds combining carbon nanomaterials (CNMs) with a biocompatible matrix are able to favor the neuronal differentiation and growth of a number of cell types, because they mimic neural-tissue nanotopography and/or conductivity. We performed comparative analysis of biomimetic scaffolds with poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) matrix and three different p-methoxyphenyl functionalized carbon nanofillers, namely, carbon nanotubes (CNTs), carbon nanohorns (CNHs), and reduced graphene oxide (RGO), dispersed at varying concentrations. qRT-PCR analysis of the modulation of neuronal markers in human circulating multipotent cells cultured on nanocomposite scaffolds showed high variability in their expression patterns depending on the scaffolds’ inhomogeneities. Local stimuli variation could result in a multi- to oligopotency shift and commitment towards multiple cell lineages, which was assessed by the qRT-PCR profiling of markers for neural, adipogenic, and myogenic cell lineages. Less conductive scaffolds, i.e., bare poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA)-, CNH-, and RGO-based nanocomposites, appeared to boost the expression of myogenic-lineage marker genes. Moreover, scaffolds are much more effective on early commitment than in subsequent differentiation. This work suggests that biomimetic PLLA carbon-nanomaterial (PLLA-CNM) scaffolds combined with multipotent autologous cells can represent a powerful tool in the regenerative medicine of multiple tissue types, opening the route to next analyses with specific and standardized scaffold features. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomimetic Nanomaterials)
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Open AccessArticle
Mimicking the Annulus Fibrosus Using Electrospun Polyester Blended Scaffolds
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(4), 537; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9040537 - 03 Apr 2019
Cited by 3
Abstract
Treatments to alleviate chronic lower back pain, caused by intervertebral disc herniation as a consequence of degenerate annulus fibrosus (AF) tissue, fail to provide long-term relief and do not restore tissue structure or function. This study aims to mimic the architecture and mechanical [...] Read more.
Treatments to alleviate chronic lower back pain, caused by intervertebral disc herniation as a consequence of degenerate annulus fibrosus (AF) tissue, fail to provide long-term relief and do not restore tissue structure or function. This study aims to mimic the architecture and mechanical environment of AF tissue using electrospun fiber scaffolds made from synthetic biopolymers-poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) and poly(L-lactic) acid (PLLA). Pure polymer and their blends (PCL%:PLLA%; 80:20, 50:50, and 20:80) are studied and material properties-fiber diameter, alignment, % crystallinity, tensile strength, and water contact angle-characterized. Tensile properties of fibers angled at 0°, 30°, and 60° (single layer scaffolds), and ±0°, ±30°, and ±60° (bilayer scaffolds) yield significant differences, with PCL being significantly stiffer with the addition of PLLA, and bilayer scaffolds considerably stronger. Findings suggest PCL:PLLA 50:50 fibers are similar to human AF properties. Furthermore, in vitro culture of AF cells on 50:50 fibers demonstrates attachment and proliferation over seven days. The optimal polymer composition for production of scaffolds that closely mimic AF tissue both structurally, mechanically, and which also support and guide favorable cell phenotype is identified. This study takes a step closer towards successful AF tissue engineering and a long-term treatment for sufferers of chronic back pain. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomimetic Nanomaterials)
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