Special Issue "Human Computer Interaction in Education"

A special issue of Multimodal Technologies and Interaction (ISSN 2414-4088).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (27 July 2018)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Omar Mubin

Western Sydney University, Australia
Website | E-Mail
Interests: human computer interaction; educational technology; social robotics; persuasive computing; scientometrics
Guest Editor
Dr. Mohammad Obaid

Uppsala University, Sweden
Website | E-Mail
Interests: interaction design; social robotics; augmented reality; virtual reality; human agent interaction; educational robots

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Technology-enabled education and pedagogy has, in recent times, gained ascendancy due to the advancements in digitisation and the overall acceptance of blended forms of learning. Learning mechanisms driven by technology (MOOCs, tablets, smart devices, social media, intelligent artefacts) provide a number of overarching benefits to the learner’s experience (such as engagement, proficiency, ease of use, profiling and customisation). Gradually, the mediation between teacher, student and technology has extended beyond 2D mediums to 3D and physical embodiments such as humanoid robots and agents. With the uptake of such novel forms of interaction both in the classroom and at home, several key questions are now being raised related to their effectiveness, particularly due to saturation, technical considerations, cultural differences, ensuing isolation of the teacher and learner distraction amongst others. Therefore, in order to discuss these and many other similar interesting viewpoints; in this Special Issue we call for submissions related to the entire spectrum of educational technology, specifically related to the design, implementation and evaluation of such forms of digital advancements.

Dr. Omar Mubin
Dr. Mohammad Obaid
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Multimodal Technologies and Interaction is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Educational Robots
  • Educational Technology
  • Inclusive Educational Technology
  • HCI In Education (HCI Curriculum)
  • STEM Learning
  • Novel Interaction Methods and Techniques for Education (VR/AR, Robots, Mobile Computing, Tabletops, NUI’s, Haptics and Tangible artifacts)
  • User studies/case studies/Reflections on Educational Technology
  • Overview or survey articles on Educational Technology
  • HCI related aspects in Blended Learning and other digital mediums such as social media
  • Serious Games (for Education)
  • Adaptive Educational Technologies
  • Educational Technology from a Teacher/Tutor/Instructor Perspective

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Using Game Design to Teach Informatics and Society Topics in Secondary Schools
Multimodal Technologies Interact. 2018, 2(4), 77; https://doi.org/10.3390/mti2040077
Received: 10 September 2018 / Revised: 15 October 2018 / Accepted: 1 November 2018 / Published: 6 November 2018
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Abstract
This article discusses the use of game design as a method for interdisciplinary project-based teaching in secondary school education to convey informatics and society topics, which encompass the larger social context of computing. There is a lot of knowledge about learning games but [...] Read more.
This article discusses the use of game design as a method for interdisciplinary project-based teaching in secondary school education to convey informatics and society topics, which encompass the larger social context of computing. There is a lot of knowledge about learning games but little background on using game design as a method for project-based teaching of social issues in informatics. We present the results of an analysis of student-created games and an evaluation of a student-authored database on learning contents found in commercial off-the-shelf games. We further contextualise these findings using a group discussion with teachers. The results underline the effectiveness of project-based teaching to raise awareness for informatics and society topics. We further outline informatics and society topics that are particularly interesting to students, genre preferences, and potentially engaging game mechanics stemming from our analyses. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Human Computer Interaction in Education)
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Open AccessArticle ERIKA—Early Robotics Introduction at Kindergarten Age
Multimodal Technologies Interact. 2018, 2(4), 64; https://doi.org/10.3390/mti2040064
Received: 27 July 2018 / Revised: 1 September 2018 / Accepted: 14 September 2018 / Published: 27 September 2018
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Abstract
In this work, we report on our attempt to design and implement an early introduction to basic robotics principles for children at kindergarten age. One of the main challenges of this effort is to explain complex robotics contents in a way that pre-school [...] Read more.
In this work, we report on our attempt to design and implement an early introduction to basic robotics principles for children at kindergarten age. One of the main challenges of this effort is to explain complex robotics contents in a way that pre-school children could follow the basic principles and ideas using examples from their world of experience. What sets apart our effort from other work is that part of the lecturing is actually done by a robot itself and that a quiz at the end of the lesson is done using robots as well. The humanoid robot Pepper from Softbank, which is a great platform for human–robot interaction experiments, was used to present a lecture on robotics by reading out the contents to the children making use of its speech synthesis capability. A quiz in a Runaround-game-show style after the lecture activated the children to recap the contents they acquired about how mobile robots work in principle. In this quiz, two LEGO Mindstorm EV3 robots were used to implement a strongly interactive scenario. Besides the thrill of being exposed to a mobile robot that would also react to the children, they were very excited and at the same time very concentrated. We got very positive feedback from the children as well as from their educators. To the best of our knowledge, this is one of only few attempts to use a robot like Pepper not as a tele-teaching tool, but as the teacher itself in order to engage pre-school children with complex robotics contents. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Human Computer Interaction in Education)
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Open AccessArticle Effect of Sensory Feedback on Turn-Taking Using Paired Devices for Children with ASD
Multimodal Technologies Interact. 2018, 2(4), 61; https://doi.org/10.3390/mti2040061
Received: 20 July 2018 / Revised: 28 August 2018 / Accepted: 18 September 2018 / Published: 20 September 2018
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Abstract
Most children can naturally engage in play and by this, develop skills while interacting with their peers and toys. However, children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) often show impairments in play skills which result in limited opportunities for interaction with others and the [...] Read more.
Most children can naturally engage in play and by this, develop skills while interacting with their peers and toys. However, children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) often show impairments in play skills which result in limited opportunities for interaction with others and the learning of social skills. In this regard, robotic devices/toys that can provide simple and attractive indications are advantageous to engage children with ASD in play activities that require social and interaction skills. This project proposes a new interaction method using paired robotic devices called COLOLO to facilitate a fundamental exchange of intention in communication so-called turn-taking. These tangible devices are designed to sense the user’s manipulation, send a message to the paired device, and display visual cues for assisting children to achieve turn-taking through play. On the sessions with COLOLO there are two devices, one held by the therapist and one by the child, and they take turns to manipulate the toys and change their colors. In this article, two experimental conditions or interaction rules: the “two-sided lighting rule” and the “one-sided lighting rule" were introduced. The two interactions rules differ from each on the way the devices used the visual cues to indicate the turn-holder. The effect of each interaction rule on children’s turn-taking behaviors was investigated through an experimental study with four children with ASD. From the results, we found that with the one-sided lighting rule participants tended to shift their gaze more and to decrease the failed attempts of turn-taking. The discussion covers the possibilities of using paired devices to describe participants’ behaviors related to turn-taking quantitatively. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Human Computer Interaction in Education)
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Open AccessArticle Analyzing Iterative Training Game Design: A Multi-Method Postmortem Analysis of CYCLES Training Center and CYCLES Carnivale
Multimodal Technologies Interact. 2018, 2(3), 46; https://doi.org/10.3390/mti2030046
Received: 18 June 2018 / Revised: 31 July 2018 / Accepted: 7 August 2018 / Published: 10 August 2018
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Abstract
That games can be used to teach specific content has been demonstrated numerous times. However, although specific game features have been conjectured to have an impact on learning outcomes, little empirical research exists on the impact of iterative design on learning outcomes. This [...] Read more.
That games can be used to teach specific content has been demonstrated numerous times. However, although specific game features have been conjectured to have an impact on learning outcomes, little empirical research exists on the impact of iterative design on learning outcomes. This article analyzes two games that have been developed to train an adult audience to recognize and avoid relying on six cognitive biases (three per game) in their decision making. The games were developed iteratively and were evaluated through a series of experiments. Although the experimental manipulations did not find a significant impact of the manipulated game features on the learning outcomes, each game iteration proved more successful than its predecessors at training players. Here, we outline a mixed-methods approach to postmortem game design analysis that helps us understand what might account for the improvement across games, and to identify new variables for future experimental training game studies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Human Computer Interaction in Education)
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