Special Issue "Ultramafic Complexes and Related Deposits"

A special issue of Minerals (ISSN 2075-163X). This special issue belongs to the section "Mineral Deposits".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Jacques Moutte

Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Mines de Saint-Etienne, Saint-Etienne, France
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Ultramafic and related rocks are important as potential sites for ore deposits of two essential base metals, chromium and nickel. They may also contain significant resources of copper and cobalt. These metals are, not only essential for the production of stainless steel, heat-resisting steels and super-alloys, they may also play an increasing role in new technologies, e.g., for the production and stocking of renewable energies. Chromite ores occur either as stratiform chromitites within layered intrusions or as podiform chromitites in the upper mantle section of ophiolitic complexes. The former have always been and are still actively studied for their importance as a PGE resource, but there is a renewed interest in the latter for their role as markers of mantle geodynamics. Nickel studies have also been undergoing recent evolutions, as the share of sulfide ores from Precambrian mafic intrusions, which has long been a major source, tends to decrease in favor of the garnierite and oxide ores formed by supergene alteration of ophiolitic peridotites. This change goes with an evolution in ore processing methods from pyrometallurgy to hydrometallurgy. In addition to metallic resources, ongoing researches suggest the ultramafic rocks could be of economic interest with regard to energy issues, as a sequestration sink for greenhouse gases, or as the site of hydrogen emanations. Overall, there are certainly many recent contributions that bring new results and ideas on these different topics; this Special Issue will provide an opportunity to make them available to a large audience.

Dr. Jacques Moutte
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • orthomagmatic ore deposits
  • ultramafic rocks
  • supergene alteration
  • hydrometallurgy of nickel and cobalt
  • chromite deposits
  • nickel deposits
  • platinum group minerals

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Elemental Concentration in Serpentinitic Soils over Ultramafic Bedrock in Sierra Bermeja (Southern Spain)
Minerals 2018, 8(10), 447; https://doi.org/10.3390/min8100447
Received: 29 August 2018 / Revised: 7 October 2018 / Accepted: 9 October 2018 / Published: 12 October 2018
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Abstract
Although the presence of potentially toxic metals in soils is normally associated with human soil pollution, these elements also appear naturally in environments in which the lithological base contains ultramafic rocks such as peridotites. Serpentinitic soils tend to develop on substrates of this [...] Read more.
Although the presence of potentially toxic metals in soils is normally associated with human soil pollution, these elements also appear naturally in environments in which the lithological base contains ultramafic rocks such as peridotites. Serpentinitic soils tend to develop on substrates of this kind, often containing metals with few or no known biological functions, which in some cases are toxic for most plants. This study assessed the level of potentially toxic metals and other elements in an endorheic basin discovered in Sierra Bermeja (Southern Spain), one of the largest peridotite outcrops on Earth. In this location—of particular interest given that basins of this kind are very rare on peridotites—six geomorphoedaphic sub-units on three different substrates were identified. The distribution of microelements in these sub-units was analyzed, and stratified random sampling was performed to identify the major ions with essential functions for living organisms and the potentially toxic metals. The lowest values for macronutrients appeared in the soils formed on ultramafic materials. When analyzing the load of potentially toxic metals, no significant differences were detected between the soils formed on serpentinite and peridotite substrates, although different values were obtained in the soils formed over acidic rocks. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ultramafic Complexes and Related Deposits)
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