Special Issue "Designing Minerals for Remediation of Environmental Contaminants"

A special issue of Minerals (ISSN 2075-163X). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Mineralogy and Biogeochemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 27 November 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Binoy Sarkar
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster University, Lancaster, LA1 4YQ, UK
Interests: clay minerals; clay modification; clay–microorganism interaction; contaminant remediation; enhanced rock weathering; soil carbon sequestration
Dr. Lei Wang
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Construction Materials, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, Germany
Interests: mineral recycling; mineral carbonation; soil/sediment remediation; stabilisation/solidification; mineral-based construction materials
Dr. Raj Mukhopadhyay
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
ICAR-Central Soil Salinity Research Institute, Karnal, Haryana-132001, India
Interests: modified clay minerals; nanoclay; clay–polymer nanocomposites; contaminant removal; arsenic biogeochemistry; poly and perfluoro alkyl substances

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Mineral materials are known to influence the source, transformation, mobility and reclamation of environmental contaminants in natural and engineered systems. Phyllosilicate minerals in particular, owing to their high reactivity and surface area, show intrinsic contaminant barrier and sequestration activities in aqueous, solid and gas phases. Mineral resources are abundant in natural deposits across the world and can be subjected to easy physical, chemical and biological modifications to further improve their contaminant reclamation abilities, leading to the development of inexpensive and sustainable environmental remediation materials. A range of modifying agents, such as surfactants, polymers, metals, microorganisms, biowastes and nanoparticles, have been shown to improve the functionality and performance of minerals for removing contaminants from water and air, or immobilising them in soils, sediments and other solid matrices, such as construction and building materials. This Special Issue aims to serve as a thematic collection of papers concerning advanced synthesis, characterisation and application of mineral-based designer materials, and their applications for environmental contaminant mitigation in liquid, solid and gaseous media.

The Special Issue welcomes both original research and review articles focusing on the mitigation of organic, inorganic and biological contaminants using mineral-based materials. The contaminants may include but are not limited to heavy metal(loid)s, dyes, pesticides, pathogens, industrial effluents and wastes, contaminants of emerging concerns (e.g., poly and perfluoro alkyl substances, pharmaceutical and personal care products, plastic-derived chemicals), volatile organic compounds, carbon dioxide and toxic gases. Papers on performance evaluation and standardisation of mineral-based materials under pilot and field-scale applications are also welcome.

Dr. Binoy Sarkar
Dr. Lei Wang
Dr. Raj Mukhopadhyay
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Minerals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • adsorption
  • advanced materials
  • air cleaning
  • biocompatible clays
  • building materials
  • carbon dioxide removal
  • clay catalysts
  • clay composites
  • clay minerals
  • clay modification
  • construction materials
  • porous materials
  • resource recycling
  • sediment remediation
  • soil remediation
  • sustainability
  • toxic gas
  • wastewater treatment

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Adsorption Properties of Waste Building Sludge for Environmental Protection
Minerals 2021, 11(3), 309; https://doi.org/10.3390/min11030309 - 17 Mar 2021
Viewed by 515
Abstract
Waste building sludge (WBS) originating in the production of concrete prestressed poles (CSW) and technical stone (TSW) used in original and Fe-modified forms (CSWFe, TSWFe) was tested as an environmentally friendly and cheap sorbent of selected cations (Cd2+ [...] Read more.
Waste building sludge (WBS) originating in the production of concrete prestressed poles (CSW) and technical stone (TSW) used in original and Fe-modified forms (CSWFe, TSWFe) was tested as an environmentally friendly and cheap sorbent of selected cations (Cd2+, Pb2+, Cs+) and anions (AsO43−, PO43−, CrO42−) from water. The experiments were performed with 0.1 and 0.5 mmol·L−1 model solutions in a batch manner at laboratory temperature. Adsorption data were fitted with the Langmuir model. The adsorption of cations (Pb2+ and Cd2+) ran almost quantitatively (>97%) on both CSW and TSW. Cesium (Cs+) adsorption on TSW reached 80%, while in the case of CSW, it was ineffective. The modification of CSW and TSW with FeII (CSWFe and TSWFe) improved their adsorption selectivity to anions by up to 70%. The adsorption of PO43− and AsO43− ran quantitatively (>98%) on modified CSWFe and TSWFe and also on initial CSW, while CrO42− was effectively adsorbed (≈80%) on TSWFe only. The adsorption affinity of tested ions in terms of adsorption capacity and sorbent consumption declined in order as follows: Pb2+ ≈ Cd2+ >> Cs+ for cations and AsO43− ≈ PO43− > CrO42− for anions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Designing Minerals for Remediation of Environmental Contaminants)
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Article
Study on Optimization of Tungsten Ore Flotation Wastewater Treatment by Response Surface Method (RSM)
Minerals 2021, 11(2), 184; https://doi.org/10.3390/min11020184 - 10 Feb 2021
Viewed by 603
Abstract
A large amount of collectors, inhibitors and modifiers such as oleic acid, water glass and sodium carbonate are added to the flotation processing of tungsten ore, resulting in the difficulty of the suspended solids (SS) with the residual water glass settling down in [...] Read more.
A large amount of collectors, inhibitors and modifiers such as oleic acid, water glass and sodium carbonate are added to the flotation processing of tungsten ore, resulting in the difficulty of the suspended solids (SS) with the residual water glass settling down in the flotation wastewater. The removal efficiency of the suspended solids is low with commonly used reagents like polyaluminium chloride (PAC) and polyacrylamide (PAM). This paper innovatively applied calcium chloride (CaCl2) to treat flotation wastewater and optimized the dosage of CaCl2, PAM and the pH value. The experimental results showed that when the dosage of 595 mg/L CaCl2 was combined with 21 mg/L PAM at pH 12, the turbidity removal ratio could reach 99.98%, and the residual turbidity of the supernatant was 0.23 NTU. The effluent could fully meet the requirements for reuse in industrial, urban miscellaneous and scenic environment water consumption (turbidity < 5 NTU). The quadratic equation model fitted with Design-Expert 8.0.6 software was constructed as Y = 91.52 + 8.68A + 1.11B − 1.02C − 1.7AB + 0.86AC + 0.06BC − 1.56A2 + 2.09B2 − 1.89C2, which had a good accuracy of the predicted responses versus the experimental data. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Designing Minerals for Remediation of Environmental Contaminants)
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Article
Treatment of Hypolimnion Water on Mineral Aggregates as the Second Step of the Hypolimnetic Withdrawal Method Used for Lake Restoration
Minerals 2021, 11(2), 98; https://doi.org/10.3390/min11020098 - 20 Jan 2021
Viewed by 509
Abstract
The study aimed to assess the usefulness of mineral aggregates in orthophosphate (OP) removal from hypolimnetic water withdrawn from eutrophic lakes. Two low-cost and easily available reactive materials were tested: lightweight expanded clay aggregate (LECA) and crushed limestone (LS). Their performance regarding OP [...] Read more.
The study aimed to assess the usefulness of mineral aggregates in orthophosphate (OP) removal from hypolimnetic water withdrawn from eutrophic lakes. Two low-cost and easily available reactive materials were tested: lightweight expanded clay aggregate (LECA) and crushed limestone (LS). Their performance regarding OP removal and the effect on the pH, Ca2+, Mg2+, N-NO3 and N-NH4 concentrations of treated water were investigated in a column experiment with four-filter beds made of LECA and amended with LS (additions of 0, 25, 50 and 75% of the bed volume). The highest OP removal (>50%) was achieved in LECA beds with high (75% by volume) amendments of LS. Neither LECA nor LS distinctly affected the pH (maximum pH increase, from 7.1 or 7.2 to 7.6, occurred in the case of the LECA bed). In real-life conditions, it is not feasible to install a full-scale bed made of these mineral aggregates on the outflow from a lake due to the large required size of such a bed. At the operation time set for 30 d, the size of a bed would need to reach between 6113.2 and 12,226.4 m3. The proposed bed should be just one of the elements of an integrated treatment system. Constructions consisting of sorption beds ought to be coupled with adequately designed zones of aquatic vegetation. Three conceptional solutions were proposed for in situ treatment of the withdrawn water, differing in arrangement and construction of the potential sorption bed. Application of such solutions should be regarded as a substantial improvement of Olszewski’s method, as it can mitigate the pollution of downstream ecosystems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Designing Minerals for Remediation of Environmental Contaminants)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

1. Title: Adsorption properties of waste bulding sludge for environmental protection

Authors: Barbora Dousova

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