Special Issue "Biomarkers in Metabolomics"

A special issue of Metabolites (ISSN 2218-1989).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2016)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Pollen K. Yeung

Professor of Pharmacy and Medicine, College of Pharmacy, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS B3H 4R2, Canada
Website | E-Mail
Interests: cardiovascular pharmacology; pharmacokinetics; cardiometabolic diseases

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Metabolomics is the study of biological systems using an integrated approach, which generates unique chemical fingerprints characterizing specific cellular processes. It focuses mainly on profiling small-molecule metabolites (metabolic profiling), and differs from genomics and proteomics, which characterize the profiles of genes and proteins, respectively.  Metabolites are typically produced in a biological system (e.g. cell, tissue, organ or organism, etc.) and are often the end products of a cellular process. Thus, while gene expression and proteomic data analyses rarely tell the whole story of what might be happening in a cell, metabolic profiling can give an instantaneous snapshot of the physiology and biological functioning of the cell.  In recent years, metabolomics has evolved into a mature science and has been applied to advance our understanding of many cellular functions in both healthy and pathologic conditions. On the other hand, biomarkers are objective; they are quantitatively measurable indicators of biological or pathogenic processes. Biomarkers are consequently increasingly used in novel drug development, the management of disease progression, and in personalized medicine. The scientific expertise and technology platforms, such as the analytical and computational tools used in both scientific disciplines, are comparable. Thus, it is conceivable to expect a synergy between biomarker science operating in a metabolomic environment and vice versa. This could be envisaged in many systemic biology studies ranging from in vitro investigation using cell cultures, to in vivo studies using mammalian and aquatic species, as well as mechanistic studies in a clinical and patient setting. Furthermore, there should also be an overlap and collaboration of the discipline with genomic and proteomic sciences, as these disciplines focus on the biological processes occurring more upstream of metabolomic studies’ focus areas. Such collaboration will undoubtedly advance our understanding of the regulation of biological functions in normal and disease states and the influence of genetic and environmental factors on biological functions. Collaboration will also further the discovery and validation of novel biomarkers. Biomarkers will in turn be increasingly implemented in clinical and patient settings. Such efforts will greatly benefit the novel development of drugs and natural health products for disease management in both traditional and complementary medicine, particularly in the management of cancer, cardiovascular, and metabolic diseases, Alzheimer’s disease, and mental illnesses, which remain a therapeutic challenge.

Prof. Dr. Pollen K.F. Yeung
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Metabolites is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.


Keywords

  • Metabolomics
  • Biomarkers
  • Drugs
  • Natural Health Products
  • Metabolites
  • Proteomics
  • Genomics

Published Papers (2 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-2
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Systemic Metabolomic Changes in Blood Samples of Lung Cancer Patients Identified by Gas Chromatography Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry
Metabolites 2015, 5(2), 192-210; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo5020192
Received: 19 December 2014 / Revised: 24 March 2015 / Accepted: 1 April 2015 / Published: 9 April 2015
Cited by 25 | PDF Full-text (1651 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Lung cancer is a leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Metabolic alterations in tumor cells coupled with systemic indicators of the host response to tumor development have the potential to yield blood profiles with clinical utility for diagnosis and monitoring of treatment. We [...] Read more.
Lung cancer is a leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Metabolic alterations in tumor cells coupled with systemic indicators of the host response to tumor development have the potential to yield blood profiles with clinical utility for diagnosis and monitoring of treatment. We report results from two separate studies using gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF MS) to profile metabolites in human blood samples that significantly differ from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) adenocarcinoma and other lung cancer cases. Metabolomic analysis of blood samples from the two studies yielded a total of 437 metabolites, of which 148 were identified as known compounds and 289 identified as unknown compounds. Differential analysis identified 15 known metabolites in one study and 18 in a second study that were statistically different (p-values <0.05). Levels of maltose, palmitic acid, glycerol, ethanolamine, glutamic acid, and lactic acid were increased in cancer samples while amino acids tryptophan, lysine and histidine decreased. Many of the metabolites were found to be significantly different in both studies, suggesting that metabolomics appears to be robust enough to find systemic changes from lung cancer, thus showing the potential of this type of analysis for lung cancer detection. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomarkers in Metabolomics)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
A Study of the Effects of Exercise on the Urinary Metabolome Using Normalisation to Individual Metabolic Output
Metabolites 2015, 5(1), 119-139; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo5010119
Received: 16 December 2014 / Revised: 13 February 2015 / Accepted: 22 February 2015 / Published: 27 February 2015
Cited by 23 | PDF Full-text (1524 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Aerobic exercise, in spite of its multi-organ benefit and potent effect on the metabolome, has yet to be investigated comprehensively via an untargeted metabolomics technology. We conducted an exploratory untargeted liquid chromatography mass spectrometry study to investigate the effects of a one-h aerobic [...] Read more.
Aerobic exercise, in spite of its multi-organ benefit and potent effect on the metabolome, has yet to be investigated comprehensively via an untargeted metabolomics technology. We conducted an exploratory untargeted liquid chromatography mass spectrometry study to investigate the effects of a one-h aerobic exercise session in the urine of three physically active males. Individual urine samples were collected over a 37-h protocol (two pre-exercise and eight post-exercise). Raw data were subjected to a variety of normalization techniques, with the most effective measure dividing each metabolite by the sum response of that metabolite for each individual across the 37-h protocol expressed as a percentage. This allowed the metabolite responses to be plotted on a normalised scale. Our results highlight significant metabolites located in the following systems: purine pathway, tryptophan metabolism, carnitine metabolism, cortisol metabolism, androgen metabolism, amino acid oxidation, as well as metabolites from the gastrointestinal microbiome. Many of the significant changes observed in our pilot investigation mirror previous research studies, of various methodological designs, published within the last 15 years, although they have never been reported at the same time in a single study. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomarkers in Metabolomics)
Figures

Figure 1

Metabolites EISSN 2218-1989 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top