Special Issue "Membranes in Biomedical Engineering: Assisting Clinical Engineers"

A special issue of Membranes (ISSN 2077-0375). This special issue belongs to the section "Membrane Applications".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Kiyotaka Sakai
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Guest Editor
Professor Emeritus of Chemical Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555, Japan
Interests: chemical engineering; membrane science; artificial organs; biomedical engineering; transport phenomena
Prof. Dr. Makoto Fukuda *
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biomedical Engineering, Kindai University, 930 Nishimitani, Kinokawa, Wakayama 649-6493, Japan
Interests: hollow-fiber membrane; capillary membrane; biomedical engineering; clinical engineers; membrane science; membrane preparation; membrane characterization; scanning probe microscopy (SPM); transport phenomena; tortuous pore diffusion model (TPD model); artificial organs; artificial kidney (dialyzer); dialysis membrane; regenerated cellulose (RC) membrane; cellulose acetate (CA) membrane; polysulfone (PSU) membrane; polyethersulfone (PES) membrane; polyester–polymeralloy (PEPATM) membrane; polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) membrane; poly-acrylonitrile (PAN) membrane; ethylene vinylalcohol co-polymer (EVALTM) membrane; hemodiafiltration (HDF); artificial lung; hemoconcentration; extracorporeal membrane oxygenator (ECMO); fouling; biocompatibility; plasma exchange therapy; cytapheresis; cell-free and concentrated ascites reinfusion therapy (CART)
* Academic & Professional Career: Asahi Kasei Industry (1993–2006); Himeji Dokkyo University (2006–2014); Department of Medical Engineering, Kindai University (2014– )
Dr. Hiroyuki Sugaya
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Clean Energy Materials Research Laboratory, Advanced Materials Research Laboratorys, Toray Industries, Inc. 2-1, Sonoyama 3-chome, Otsu, Siga 520-0842, Japan
Interests: hollow-fiber membrane; chemical engineering; polymer chemistry;membrane science; membrane preparation; membrane characterization; transport phenomena; artificial organs; artificial kidney (dialyzer); dialysis membrane; membrane; polysulfone (PSU) membrane; polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) membrane; hemodiafiltration (HDF); fouling; biocompatibility; antithrombotic material

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Since Dow Chemical began manufacturing hollow-fiber dialyzers (Capillary Kidney, Stewart Kidney) in 1968, which was the result of collaboration between medicine and engineering, blood purification technology in biomedical engineering has made great progress. In particular, the progress of blood purification membranes is notable, and industrial chemistry such as polymer synthesis and hollow-fiber membrane production technology has evolved into a major medical device industry. Furthermore, membrane evaluation methods such as microscopic observation technology have been developed, and membrane permeation theory based on theoretical and quantitative approaches have evolved. The tortuous pore diffusion model, which is one of them, associates higher-order structural factors with mass transfer characteristics, and it is useful for estimating the permeation characteristics of solutes, analyzing mass transfer phenomena and designing blood purification membranes. On the other hand, the membrane device must be designed appropriately in order to maximize the performance of the membrane. The design of the membrane device also determines the performance and safety of the device. These approaches have advanced membrane science and contributed to blood purification technology (biomedical engineering). Membrane science is also significant in terms of contributing to biomedical engineering.

At present, various membranes for biomedical engineering such as artificial lung, plasma exchange therapy, hemofiltration membrane, and hemoadsorption membrane are contributing to medical treatment around the world. Most recently, with the unprecedented COVID-19 pandemic, extracorporeal membrane oxygenators (ECMOs), which treat patients with COVID-19 infection, have been attracting attention as the “last stronghold”. In Japan, licensed clinical engineers are actively operating ventilators and extracorporeal devices such as ECMOs or blood purification devices. Membrane science and biomedical engineering are indispensable in medicine around the world and must be further advanced in the future.

In this Special Issue on “Membranes in Biomedical Engineering” of the journal Membranes, researchers are invited to contribute original research papers, as well as review articles or short communications, related to the preparation and characterization of membranes, transport phenomena, antithrombotic material, fouling, biocompatibility, module and reactor design, process design, and industrial perspectives.

The topics include but are not limited to extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), gas separation membrane, artificial organs (artificial kidney, dialyzer, artificial liver, artificial pancreas), bioartificial organs (bioartificial kidney, bioartificial liver, bioartificial pancreas, cell culture, scaffold), blood purification membranes, tissue engineering, and regenerative medicine in biomedical engineering.

We thank Japanese Society for Artificial Organs (Journal of Artificial Organs) for promoting our Special Issue.

Prof. Dr. Kiyotaka Sakai
Prof. Dr. Makoto Fukuda
Dr. Hiroyuki Sugaya
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Membranes is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Hollow-fiber membrane
  • Capillary membrane
  • Biomedical engineering
  • Clinical engineer
  • Membrane preparation
  • Membrane characterization
  • Transport phenomena
  • Pore model
  • Artificial organs
  • Blood purification
  • Artificial kidney (dialyzer)
  • Artificial lung
  • Dialysis membrane
  • Polysulfone (PSU)
  • Polyethersulfone (PES)
  • Hemodiafiltration (HDF)
  • Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO)
  • Fouling
  • Biocompatibility
  • Antithrombotic material
  • Plasma exchange therapy
  • Cytapheresis
  • Cell-free and concentrated ascites reinfusion therapy (CART)
  • Hemoconcentration
  • Module and reactor design
  • Process design

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Electron Microscopic Confirmation of Anisotropic Pore Characteristics for ECMO Membranes Theoretically Validating the Risk of SARS-CoV-2 Permeation
Membranes 2021, 11(7), 529; https://doi.org/10.3390/membranes11070529 - 14 Jul 2021
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Abstract
The objective of this study is to clarify the pore structure of ECMO membranes by using our approach and theoretically validate the risk of SARS-CoV-2 permeation. There has not been any direct evidence for SARS-CoV-2 leakage through the membrane in ECMO support for [...] Read more.
The objective of this study is to clarify the pore structure of ECMO membranes by using our approach and theoretically validate the risk of SARS-CoV-2 permeation. There has not been any direct evidence for SARS-CoV-2 leakage through the membrane in ECMO support for critically ill COVID-19 patients. The precise pore structure of recent membranes was elucidated by direct microscopic observation for the first time. The three types of membranes, polypropylene, polypropylene coated with thin silicone layer, and polymethylpentene (PMP), have unique pore structures, and the pore structures on the inner and outer surfaces of the membranes are completely different anisotropic structures. From these data, the partition coefficients and intramembrane diffusion coefficients of SARS-CoV-2 were quantified using the membrane transport model. Therefore, SARS-CoV-2 may permeate the membrane wall with the plasma filtration flow or wet lung. The risk of SARS-CoV-2 permeation is completely different due to each anisotropic pore structure. We theoretically demonstrate that SARS-CoV-2 is highly likely to permeate the membrane transporting from the patient’s blood to the gas side, and may diffuse from the gas side outlet port of ECMO leading to the extra-circulatory spread of the SARS-CoV-2 (ECMO infection). Development of a new generation of nanoscale membrane confirmation is proposed for next-generation extracorporeal membrane oxygenator and system with long-term durability is envisaged. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Membranes in Biomedical Engineering: Assisting Clinical Engineers)
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Article
Analytical Solutions of a Two-Compartment Model Based on the Volume-Average Theory for Blood Toxin Concentration during and after Dialysis
Membranes 2021, 11(7), 506; https://doi.org/10.3390/membranes11070506 - 05 Jul 2021
Viewed by 782
Abstract
Accurate prediction of blood toxin concentration during and after dialysis will greatly contribute to the determination of dialysis treatment conditions. Conventional models, namely single-compartment model and two-compartment model, have advantages and disadvantages in terms of accuracy and practical application. In this study, we [...] Read more.
Accurate prediction of blood toxin concentration during and after dialysis will greatly contribute to the determination of dialysis treatment conditions. Conventional models, namely single-compartment model and two-compartment model, have advantages and disadvantages in terms of accuracy and practical application. In this study, we attempted to derive the mathematical model that predicts blood toxin concentrations during and after dialysis, which has both accuracy and practicality. To propose the accurate model, a new two-compartment model was mathematically derived by adapting volume-averaging theory to the mass transfer around peripheral tissues. Subsequently, to propose a practical model for predicting the blood toxin concentration during dialysis, an analytical solution expressed as algebraic expression was derived by adopting variable transformation. Furthermore, the other analytical solution that predicts rebound phenomena after dialysis was also derived through similar steps. The comparisons with the clinical data revealed that the proposed analytical solutions can reproduce the behavior of the measured blood urea concentration during and after dialysis. The analytical solutions proposed as algebraic expressions will allow a doctor to estimate the blood toxin concentration of a patient during and after dialysis. The proposed analytical solutions may be useful to consider the treatment conditions for dialysis, including the rebound phenomenon. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Membranes in Biomedical Engineering: Assisting Clinical Engineers)
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