Special Issue "Membranes: Fouling, Scaling and Aging"

A special issue of Membranes (ISSN 2077-0375).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2016).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Jega Veeriah Jegatheesan
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Engineering, RMIT University, Melbourne 3000, Australia
Interests: water (treatment, distribution, modeling); wastewater (MBR, membranes in agriculture, aquaculture); saltwater intrusion; resource recovery (mine tailing ponds, dye and salt from textile effluent); novel technologies (forward osmosis, membrane distillation)
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleages,

This Special Issue will be dedicated to the fouling, scaling, and aging (FSA) of high- and low-pressure membranes when they are applied for various separation processes. Composition, phases, and other physical properties that feed and permeate streams will be one of the major factors of the FSA of membranes. Different industrial effluents will affect the FSA of membranes uniquely. Organic, inorganic, and bio-fouling will affect the performance of membranes on their own ways. Membrane materials and structures will be another factor of FSA of membranes. Interaction of membrane materials with process constituents, as well as their deterioration due to processes such as osmosis, will play a significant role of FSA. Knowledge on the above would lead to the development of (i) novel pre-treatments of process constituents, (ii) anti-foulants, (iii) anti-scalants, and (iv) prediction tools for the FSA of membranes.

Thus, we call for papers on the following areas, which are applicable to microfiltration, ultrafiltration, nanofiltration, reverse osmosis, membrane distillation, forward osmosis, and other membrane processes (papers could focus only on fouling or scaling or ageing or else combination of those features):

  • Effect of membrane materials and structures on fouling, scaling, and aging
  • Types and composition of foulants/scalants under different membrane separation processes
  • Modelling and predicting the fouling, scaling, and aging under various membrane separation processes
  • Preventing and decreasing the rate of fouling, scaling, and aging of membranes
  • Reuse of aged membranes
  • Economic evaluation of fouling, scaling, and aging of membranes

We look forward to submissions on different scales (laboratory to full-scale studies) from various industries.

Prof. Dr. Jega Veeriah Jegatheesan
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Membranes is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • microfiltration
  • ultrafiltration
  • nanofiltration
  • reverse osmosis
  • membrane distillation
  • forward osmosis
  • fouling
  • scaling
  • membrane age

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle
Combining Coagulation/MIEX with Biological Activated Carbon Treatment to Control Organic Fouling in the Microfiltration of Secondary Effluent
Membranes 2016, 6(3), 39; https://doi.org/10.3390/membranes6030039 - 30 Jul 2016
Cited by 2
Abstract
Coagulation, magnetic ion exchange resin (MIEX) and biological activated carbon (BAC) were examined at lab scale as standalone, and sequential pre-treatments for controlling the organic fouling of a microfiltration membrane by biologically treated secondary effluent (BTSE) using a multi-cycle approach. MIEX gave slightly [...] Read more.
Coagulation, magnetic ion exchange resin (MIEX) and biological activated carbon (BAC) were examined at lab scale as standalone, and sequential pre-treatments for controlling the organic fouling of a microfiltration membrane by biologically treated secondary effluent (BTSE) using a multi-cycle approach. MIEX gave slightly greater enhancement in flux than coagulation due to greater removal of high molecular weight (MW) humic substances, although it was unable to remove high MW biopolymers. BAC treatment was considerably more effective for improving the flux than coagulation or MIEX. This was due to the biodegradation of biopolymers and/or their adsorption by the biofilm, and adsorption of humic substances by the activated carbon, as indicated by size exclusion chromatography. Coagulation or MIEX followed by BAC treatment further reduced the problematic foulants and significantly improved the flux performance. The unified membrane fouling index showed that the reduction of membrane fouling by standalone BAC treatment was 42%. This improved to 65%, 70%, and 93% for alum, ferric chloride and MIEX pre-treatment, respectively, when followed by BAC treatment. This study showed the potential of sequential MIEX and BAC pre-treatment for controlling organic fouling and thus enhancing the performance of microfiltration in the reclamation of BTSE. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Membranes: Fouling, Scaling and Aging)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
PES Surface Modification Using Green Chemistry: New Generation of Antifouling Membranes
Membranes 2016, 6(2), 23; https://doi.org/10.3390/membranes6020023 - 18 Apr 2016
Cited by 9
Abstract
A major limitation in using membrane-based separation processes is the loss of performance due to membrane fouling. This drawback can be addressed thanks to surface modification treatments. A new and promising surface modification using green chemistry has been recently investigated. This modification is [...] Read more.
A major limitation in using membrane-based separation processes is the loss of performance due to membrane fouling. This drawback can be addressed thanks to surface modification treatments. A new and promising surface modification using green chemistry has been recently investigated. This modification is carried out at room temperature and in aqueous medium using green catalyst (enzyme) and nontoxic modifier, which can be safely labelled “green surface modification”. This modification can be considered as a nucleus of new generation of antifouling membranes and surfaces. In the current research, ferulic acid modifier and laccase bio-catalyst were used to make poly(ethersulfone) (PES) membrane less vulnerable to protein adsorption. The blank and modified PES membranes are evaluated based on e.g., their flux and protein repellence. Both the blank and the modified PES membranes (or laminated PES on silicon dioxide surface) are characterized using many techniques e.g., SEM, EDX, XPS and SPM, etc. The pure water flux of the most modified membranes was reduced by 10% on average relative to the blank membrane, and around a 94% reduction in protein adsorption was determined. In the conclusions section, a comparison between three modifiers—ferulic acid, and two other previously used modifiers (4-hydroxybenzoic acid and gallic acid)—is presented. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Membranes: Fouling, Scaling and Aging)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessFeature PaperReview
A Short Review of Membrane Fouling in Forward Osmosis Processes
Membranes 2017, 7(2), 30; https://doi.org/10.3390/membranes7020030 - 12 Jun 2017
Cited by 33
Abstract
Interest in forward osmosis (FO) research has rapidly increased in the last decade due to problems of water and energy scarcity. FO processes have been used in many applications, including wastewater reclamation, desalination, energy production, fertigation, and food and pharmaceutical processing. However, the [...] Read more.
Interest in forward osmosis (FO) research has rapidly increased in the last decade due to problems of water and energy scarcity. FO processes have been used in many applications, including wastewater reclamation, desalination, energy production, fertigation, and food and pharmaceutical processing. However, the inherent disadvantages of FO, such as lower permeate water flux compared to pressure driven membrane processes, concentration polarisation (CP), reverse salt diffusion, the energy consumption of draw solution recovery and issues of membrane fouling have restricted its industrial applications. This paper focuses on the fouling phenomena of FO processes in different areas, including organic, inorganic and biological categories, for better understanding of this long-standing issue in membrane processes. Furthermore, membrane fouling monitoring and mitigation strategies are reviewed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Membranes: Fouling, Scaling and Aging)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop