Special Issue "Supported Lipid Membranes"

A special issue of Membranes (ISSN 2077-0375). This special issue belongs to the section "Membrane Preparation and Characterization".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2016)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Bernhard Schuster

Institute for Synthetic Bioarchitectures, Department of NanoBiotechnology, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Muthgasse 11, 1190 Vienna, Austria
Website | E-Mail
Interests: supported lipid membranes; nanobiotechnology; membrane protein based biosensors

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue is dedicated to past and future developments in the field of supported lipid membranes, which are comprised of soft biological matter, and hard solids. These synthetic architectures constitute an excellent model system, mimicking the cell envelope structure of cells. As supported lipid membranes are accessible to a wide variety of sophisticated surface-specific analytical techniques, very sensitive and systematic studies on processes, such as cell signaling, ligand–receptor interactions, enzymatic reactions occurring at the cell surface, as well as pathogen attacks can be performed. In addition to the cell mimics, they are perfectly suited to create biocompatible/biomimetic interfaces, which constitute an increasing challenge in material science. Critical endeavors and new discoveries in this scientific field have been achieved and, thus, supported lipid membranes are having an increasing impact on drug screening, modern medical care and diagnostics, food safety, environmental monitoring, and biosensors, for example, DNA-sequencing or biowarfare control when functionalized with transmembrane proteins or membrane-active peptides. The main focus of this forthcoming Special Issue is to present a comprehensive overview on the fabrication, characterization, application in basic and applied science, and future trends by assembling state-of-the-art research articles and reviews on supported lipid membranes.

Dr. Bernhard Schuster
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Membranes is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • biocompatible interface
  • biomedical sciences
  • bioinspired materials
  • cell envelope mimics
  • physical characterization
  • reconstitution matrix
  • supported lipid membranes
  • surface-specific analytical techniques

Published Papers (5 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-5
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle Single Lipid Molecule Dynamics on Supported Lipid Bilayers with Membrane Curvature
Received: 1 December 2016 / Revised: 7 March 2017 / Accepted: 11 March 2017 / Published: 15 March 2017
Cited by 11 | PDF Full-text (2104 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
The plasma membrane is a highly compartmentalized, dynamic material and this organization is essential for a wide variety of cellular processes. Nanoscale domains allow proteins to organize for cell signaling, endo- and exocytosis, and other essential processes. Even in the absence of proteins, [...] Read more.
The plasma membrane is a highly compartmentalized, dynamic material and this organization is essential for a wide variety of cellular processes. Nanoscale domains allow proteins to organize for cell signaling, endo- and exocytosis, and other essential processes. Even in the absence of proteins, lipids have the ability to organize into domains as a result of a variety of chemical and physical interactions. One feature of membranes that affects lipid domain formation is membrane curvature. To directly test the role of curvature in lipid sorting, we measured the accumulation of two similar lipids, 1,2-Dihexadecanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DHPE) and hexadecanoic acid (HDA), using a supported lipid bilayer that was assembled over a nanopatterned surface to obtain regions of membrane curvature. Both lipids studied contain 16 carbon, saturated tails and a head group tag for fluorescence microscopy measurements. The accumulation of lipids at curvatures ranging from 28 nm to 55 nm radii was measured and fluorescein labeled DHPE accumulated more than fluorescein labeled HDA at regions of membrane curvature. We then tested whether single biotinylated DHPE molecules sense curvature using single particle tracking methods. Similar to groups of fluorescein labeled DHPE accumulating at curvature, the dynamics of single molecules of biotinylated DHPE was also affected by membrane curvature and highly confined motion was observed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Supported Lipid Membranes)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Protein-Based Graphene Biosensors: Optimizing Artificial Chemoreception in Bilayer Lipid Membranes
Received: 19 July 2016 / Revised: 2 September 2016 / Accepted: 5 September 2016 / Published: 7 September 2016
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1562 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Proteinaceous moieties are critical elements in most detection systems, including biosensing platforms. Their potential is undoubtedly vast, yet many issues regarding their full exploitation remain unsolved. On the other hand, the biosensor formats with the higher marketability probabilities are enzyme in nature and [...] Read more.
Proteinaceous moieties are critical elements in most detection systems, including biosensing platforms. Their potential is undoubtedly vast, yet many issues regarding their full exploitation remain unsolved. On the other hand, the biosensor formats with the higher marketability probabilities are enzyme in nature and electrochemical in concept. To no surprise, alternative materials for hosting catalysis within an electrode casing have received much attention lately to demonstrate a catalysis-coated device. Graphene and ZnO are presented as ideal materials to modify electrodes and biosensor platforms, especially in protein-based detection. Our group developed electrochemical sensors based on these nanomaterials for the sensitive detection of cholesterol using cholesterol oxidase incorporated in stabilized lipid films. A comparison between the two platforms is provided and discussed. In a broader sense, the not-so-remote prospect of quickly assembling a protein-based flexible biosensing detector to fulfill site-specific requirements is appealing to both university researchers and industry developers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Supported Lipid Membranes)
Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle Biochip for the Detection of Bacillus anthracis Lethal Factor and Therapeutic Agents against Anthrax Toxins
Received: 12 May 2016 / Revised: 13 June 2016 / Accepted: 14 June 2016 / Published: 24 June 2016
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (3183 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Tethered lipid bilayer membranes (tBLMs) have been used in many applications, including biosensing and membrane protein structure studies. This report describes a biosensor for anthrax toxins that was fabricated through the self-assembly of a tBLM with B. anthracis protective antigen ion channels that [...] Read more.
Tethered lipid bilayer membranes (tBLMs) have been used in many applications, including biosensing and membrane protein structure studies. This report describes a biosensor for anthrax toxins that was fabricated through the self-assembly of a tBLM with B. anthracis protective antigen ion channels that are both the recognition element and electrochemical transducer. We characterize the sensor and its properties with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance. The sensor shows a sensitivity similar to ELISA and can also be used to rapidly screen for molecules that bind to the toxins and potentially inhibit their lethal effects. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Supported Lipid Membranes)
Figures

Graphical abstract

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessFeature PaperReview Artificial Lipid Membranes: Past, Present, and Future
Received: 14 June 2017 / Revised: 5 July 2017 / Accepted: 20 July 2017 / Published: 26 July 2017
Cited by 15 | PDF Full-text (2652 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The multifaceted role of biological membranes prompted early the development of artificial lipid-based models with a primary view of reconstituting the natural functions in vitro so as to study and exploit chemoreception for sensor engineering. Over the years, a fair amount of knowledge [...] Read more.
The multifaceted role of biological membranes prompted early the development of artificial lipid-based models with a primary view of reconstituting the natural functions in vitro so as to study and exploit chemoreception for sensor engineering. Over the years, a fair amount of knowledge on the artificial lipid membranes, as both, suspended or supported lipid films and liposomes, has been disseminated and has helped to diversify and expand initial scopes. Artificial lipid membranes can be constructed by several methods, stabilized by various means, functionalized in a variety of ways, experimented upon intensively, and broadly utilized in sensor development, drug testing, drug discovery or as molecular tools and research probes for elucidating the mechanics and the mechanisms of biological membranes. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art, discusses the diversity of applications, and presents future perspectives. The newly-introduced field of artificial cells further broadens the applicability of artificial membranes in studying the evolution of life. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Supported Lipid Membranes)
Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessReview Tethered and Polymer Supported Bilayer Lipid Membranes: Structure and Function
Received: 4 May 2016 / Revised: 24 May 2016 / Accepted: 25 May 2016 / Published: 30 May 2016
Cited by 24 | PDF Full-text (2260 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Solid supported bilayer lipid membranes are model systems to mimic natural cell membranes in order to understand structural and functional properties of such systems. The use of a model system allows for the use of a wide variety of analytical tools including atomic [...] Read more.
Solid supported bilayer lipid membranes are model systems to mimic natural cell membranes in order to understand structural and functional properties of such systems. The use of a model system allows for the use of a wide variety of analytical tools including atomic force microscopy, impedance spectroscopy, neutron reflectometry, and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy. Among the large number of different types of model membranes polymer-supported and tethered lipid bilayers have been shown to be versatile and useful systems. Both systems consist of a lipid bilayer, which is de-coupled from an underlying support by a spacer cushion. Both systems will be reviewed, with an emphasis on the effect that the spacer moiety has on the bilayer properties. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Supported Lipid Membranes)
Figures

Figure 1

Membranes EISSN 2077-0375 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top