Special Issue "Feature Papers"

A special issue of Medicines (ISSN 2305-6320).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 May 2015).

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Gerhard Litscher

TCM Research Center Graz, Research Unit for Complementary and Integrative Laser Medicine, and Research Unit of Biomedical Engineering in Anesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine, the Medical University of Graz, Auenbruggerplatz 39, 8036 Graz, Austria
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +436641140879
Fax: +43 316 385 13908
Interests: evidence-based complementary medicine; integrative medicine; laser medicine; high-tech acupuncture; neuromonitoring

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Medicines is an international open-access journal of conventional medicine and proven or evidence-based traditional, complementary and alternative medicine, published quarterly online.

This Special Issue focuses on the latest innovative aspects that underline the further enhancement and development of medicine. Special emphasis is given to new methodological and technical investigations, for example, results obtained from all kinds of innovations in the field of integrative medicine.

We welcome papers reporting the latest results of evidence-based complementary medicine and those exploring integrative medicine in general. Studies concerning biomedicine based on modern technology are especially welcome. Manuscripts should deal with, but are not limited to, the keywords listed below.

Before submission authors should carefully read over the journal's Instructions for Authors, which are located at https://www.mdpi.com/journal/medicines/instructions. Prospective authors should submit an electronic copy of their complete manuscript through the online system at https://susy.mdpi.com. Submission closes on February 28, 2015. All papers submitted and accepted for publication before that date will be published immediately and collated on the Special Issue website.

Prof. Dr. Gerhard Litscher
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Medicines is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • evidence-based complementary medicine
  • integrative medicine
  • traditional medicine
  • acupuncture
  • herbal medicine
  • laser medicine

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
The Potential of Double Blinding with Two Placebo Acupuncture Needles: A Randomized Controlled Pilot-Trial
Medicines 2015, 2(1), 11-27; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicines2010011
Received: 30 October 2014 / Accepted: 24 December 2014 / Published: 30 December 2014
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (453 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Background: Whether acupuncture treatment employing multiple penetrating, skin-touch placebo, or no-touch placebo needles designed for double blinding actually do blind practitioners and patients has not been investigated. We aimed to investigate this question. Subjects: 120 patients with functional neck/shoulder stiffness but in otherwise [...] Read more.
Background: Whether acupuncture treatment employing multiple penetrating, skin-touch placebo, or no-touch placebo needles designed for double blinding actually do blind practitioners and patients has not been investigated. We aimed to investigate this question. Subjects: 120 patients with functional neck/shoulder stiffness but in otherwise healthy condition were randomly assigned to a treatment using four penetrating, four skin-touch placebo, or four no-touch placebo needles. Each of six acupuncturists applied four needles to four acupoints in the neck/shoulder of 20 patients. Acupuncturists and patients were asked to guess the treatment mode and their confidence in their guesses on 100 mm visual analog scales. Results: The kappa coefficients between practitioner guesses and treatment type and between patient guesses and treatment type were 0.15 and 0.44, respectively. The median score of practitioner confidence was 46.8, and no significant difference in confidence between correct and incorrect guesses was revealed for any treatment. The median score of patient confidence for correct guesses was 77.6. The kappa coefficient between practitioner and patient guesses was 0.06. Conclusions: The practitioners were blinded to the nature of treatment using the same multiple needles, but patient blinding was insufficient. Further improvement is necessary to achieve satisfactory patient blinding with these acupuncture needles. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers)
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Open AccessArticle
RegentK and Physiotherapy—Electrodermal Mapping
Medicines 2014, 1(1), 22-31; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicines1010022
Received: 1 July 2014 / Revised: 10 September 2014 / Accepted: 18 September 2014 / Published: 30 September 2014
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Abstract
Background: Within this study, a new system which measures and analyzes electrical skin impedance in 48 channels within a 2.5 × 3.5 cm matrix is used in rehabilitation medicine for the first time. Methods: Electrodermal activity was measured in 20 patients before and [...] Read more.
Background: Within this study, a new system which measures and analyzes electrical skin impedance in 48 channels within a 2.5 × 3.5 cm matrix is used in rehabilitation medicine for the first time. Methods: Electrodermal activity was measured in 20 patients before and after two different non-surgical treatments of a completely ruptured anterior cruciate ligament. The first treatment, RegentK, was developed by Mohamed Khalifa, the second is a standard physiotherapy. Results: The patients in the two groups were age-matched, and all demographic data showed no significant differences. It was interesting that electrodermal activity was significantly decreased only after RegentK. Conclusion: We conclude that not only local effects of pressure application are responsible for these results, rather as yet unknown neurovegetative mechanisms have to be taken into consideration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers)
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Open AccessArticle
Temperature Measurements in Rehabilitation in Patients with Completely Ruptured Anterior Cruciate Ligament before and after RegentK and Physiotherapy
Medicines 2014, 1(1), 12-21; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicines1010012
Received: 26 May 2014 / Revised: 30 June 2014 / Accepted: 9 July 2014 / Published: 16 July 2014
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Abstract
Acute skin surface temperature effects on the knee were investigated after a manual therapy developed by Mohamed Khalifa (RegentK) compared to standard physiotherapy in patients with completely ruptured anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). Twenty patients participated in this study. They were randomly assigned to [...] Read more.
Acute skin surface temperature effects on the knee were investigated after a manual therapy developed by Mohamed Khalifa (RegentK) compared to standard physiotherapy in patients with completely ruptured anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). Twenty patients participated in this study. They were randomly assigned to group A (receiving RegentK) or group B (physiotherapy). Each group consisted of 10 patients. Temperature values were registered on four spots (three on the knee, one on the foot) of the injured and the healthy leg (control). Skin temperature increased significantly after RegentK on all sites of the injured leg, but after physiotherapy only the measurement spots on the knee showed significant increases. After RegentK the temperature had also increased significantly on the control leg, whereas in group B, the results were not significant. Experimental and clinical testing of technical equipment, e.g., infrared thermography, for ACL injuries is important for a better understanding of the different physiological/pathophysiological mechanisms underlying different therapy approaches. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers)
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Open AccessArticle
Comparison of Cultivars and Seasonal Variation in Blueberry (Vaccinium Species) Leaf Extract on Adult T-Cell Leukemia Cell Line Growth Suppression
Medicines 2014, 1(1), 3-11; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicines1010003
Received: 7 November 2013 / Revised: 20 January 2014 / Accepted: 31 March 2014 / Published: 30 June 2014
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (398 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The inhibitory effects of blueberry leaves on the proliferation of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) cell lines have previously been reported. A comparison of blueberry leaf extracts from different cultivars and seasonal variation were investigated regarding their effects on ATL cell line proliferation. The [...] Read more.
The inhibitory effects of blueberry leaves on the proliferation of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) cell lines have previously been reported. A comparison of blueberry leaf extracts from different cultivars and seasonal variation were investigated regarding their effects on ATL cell line proliferation. The inhibitory effects of 80% ethanol leaf extracts from different blueberry cultivars collected from April to December in 2006 or 2008 were evaluated using two ATL cell lines. The bioactivities of leaf extracts of rabbit-eye blueberry (Vaccinium virgatum Aiton; RB species), southern highbush blueberry (V. spp.; SB species), northern highbush blueberry (V. corymbosum L.; NB species), and wild blueberry (V. bracteatum Thunb.; WB species) were compared. Of these, leaves of the RB species collected in December showed a significantly stronger inhibitory effect in both cell lines than the SB, NB, or WB species. These results suggest elevated biosynthesis of ATL-preventative bioactive compounds in the leaves of the RB species before the defoliation season. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Acupoint Activation: Response in Microcirculation and the Role of Mast Cells
Medicines 2014, 1(1), 56-63; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicines1010056
Received: 14 October 2014 / Revised: 10 November 2014 / Accepted: 13 November 2014 / Published: 20 November 2014
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (112 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Background: According to Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) theory, acupuncture effects are based on the integrity function of meridians. Meridians are thought to regulate body function through the normal flow of qi and/or blood. Disturbances in this flow are thought to cause disease, and [...] Read more.
Background: According to Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) theory, acupuncture effects are based on the integrity function of meridians. Meridians are thought to regulate body function through the normal flow of qi and/or blood. Disturbances in this flow are thought to cause disease, and acupuncture techniques are believed to cure disease by regulating this flow. However, it is still difficult to understand the exact meaning of qi and to evaluate the activation of meridians. Thus, more and more attention has been focused on the relationship of acupuncture and circulation. Methods: In this narrative review, the authors focus on the state of the art in acupoint activation, microcirculation response, and on investigation of mast cells, based on current literature research. Results: Altogether, 52 references are cited and discussed critically. A schematic diagram of the relationship between acupuncture stimulation, changes of microcirculation and mast cells is presented as result. Conclusion: The block diagram presented in this review article shows that mast cells might play an important role in circulation response after acupoint stimulation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers)
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