Special Issue "Auricular Medicine: Gateway to the Brain in Healing"

A special issue of Medicines (ISSN 2305-6320).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Im Quah-Smith

Royal Women's Hospital, Randwick, Australia, and Roseville Wellness Group, Roseville, NSW 2069, Australia
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Acupuncture; Auriculotherapy; Laser; Human Resilience; Mental Health
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Gerhard Litscher

TCM Research Center Graz, Research Unit for Complementary and Integrative Laser Medicine, and Research Unit of Biomedical Engineering in Anesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine, the Medical University of Graz, Auenbruggerplatz 39, 8036 Graz, Austria
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +436641140879
Fax: +43 316 385 13908
Interests: evidence-based complementary medicine; integrative medicine; laser medicine; high-tech acupuncture; neuromonitoring

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Auricular medicine is a traditional method. It includes auricular diagnosis, as well as auriculotherapy and auricular preventive medicine. Exemplarily ear acupuncture has been successfully used in various fields of medicine, especially for pain relief. The scope of its application in clinical care has grown immensely, hence, our call for this Special Issue.

The introduction of lasers, especially low-level lasers, to auriculotherapy brought a quantifiable modality to the repertoire of modaltities already available to clinicians, including needles, electro-stimulation, acupressure, liquid stimulation, and vibrations.

This Special Issue focuses on historical background, development and anatomical and neurological/neurophysiological aspects of auricular medicine and also on the different methods of ear diagnosis, treatment and prevention. The Special Issue is open to all manuscripts on all types of ear stimulation methods. Theoretical, animal experimental studies, investigations in healthy volunteers, short reports, letters to the editors, study designs and clinical studies, and case reports and photo essays are welcome.

We look forward to your valuable manuscript. Together with the managing editorial team from Medicines we will do our best to support you by publishing your important data.

Dr. Im Quah-Smith
Prof. DDr. Gerhard Litscher 

Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Medicines is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Auricular medicine
  • ear acupuncture
  • auricular diagnosis
  • auriculotherapy
  • auricular preventive medicine

Published Papers (8 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-8
Export citation of selected articles as:

Editorial

Jump to: Research, Review, Other

Open AccessEditorial
Ear Acupuncture according to the NADA (National Acupuncture Detoxification Association)
Received: 26 March 2019 / Accepted: 28 March 2019 / Published: 31 March 2019
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (572 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This editorial is a brief report on the National Acupuncture Detoxification Association (NADA) ear acupuncture and is intended to briefly summarize the main scientific work. The complementary addiction-detoxification auricular acupuncture method has not been sufficiently experimentally explored in many areas. There have been [...] Read more.
This editorial is a brief report on the National Acupuncture Detoxification Association (NADA) ear acupuncture and is intended to briefly summarize the main scientific work. The complementary addiction-detoxification auricular acupuncture method has not been sufficiently experimentally explored in many areas. There have been clinical studies, some of which contradict the success. A total of 27 referenced publications were found that refer to the method that has existed for many decades and should be briefly listed here. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Auricular Medicine: Gateway to the Brain in Healing)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessEditorial
Nogier Reflex: Physiological and Experimental Results in Auricular Medicine–A New Hypothesis
Medicines 2018, 5(4), 132; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicines5040132
Received: 10 December 2018 / Accepted: 10 December 2018 / Published: 12 December 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1111 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This editorial describes a new hypothesis concerning the nature and possible mechanisms of the Nogier reflex or reflex auriculo-cardiac (RAC; also vascular autonomic signal VAS). A multimodal concept for future RAC research is proposed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Auricular Medicine: Gateway to the Brain in Healing)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessEditorial
Laser Acupuncture and Heart Rate Variability—Scientific Considerations
Received: 4 May 2018 / Revised: 4 May 2018 / Accepted: 4 May 2018 / Published: 7 May 2018
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (353 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Auricular Medicine: Gateway to the Brain in Healing)
Figures

Figure 1

Research

Jump to: Editorial, Review, Other

Open AccessArticle
Gender Differences in Laser Acupuncture—Results of a Crossover Study with Green and Yellow Laser at the Ear Point Shenmen
Received: 25 January 2018 / Revised: 12 March 2018 / Accepted: 15 March 2018 / Published: 15 March 2018
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (3578 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Background: One of the most commonly used auricular acupuncture points selected for different pain treatment regimens is Shenmen. This point on the ear has been recognized as having a wide number of applications, as found by scientific investigation. Methods: Within this crossover study, [...] Read more.
Background: One of the most commonly used auricular acupuncture points selected for different pain treatment regimens is Shenmen. This point on the ear has been recognized as having a wide number of applications, as found by scientific investigation. Methods: Within this crossover study, the ear acupoint Shenmen was stimulated with two different kinds of laser (green, 532 nm and yellow, 589 nm) in 22 healthy volunteers (13 female, 9 male; mean age ± SD = 25.3 ± 4.1 years; range 21–36 years). Both green and yellow lasers were used for 15 min in the same volunteers in two different sessions. Results: The most prominent finding was that systolic blood pressure decreased significantly (p = 0.048) after yellow laser stimulation. Heart rate also decreased significantly (p < 0.001), whereas heart rate variability ratio low frequency (LF)/high frequency (HF) (p < 0.001) increased. The effects were significantly more pronounced in females than in males. In addition, the temperature was measured, and temperature increases were demonstrated at different locations on the ear using imaging methods. Conclusions: This study shows evidence of the effect of auricular laser acupuncture. However, a comparison with other publications was impossible because this is the first study using green and yellow laser stimulation on the ear. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Auricular Medicine: Gateway to the Brain in Healing)
Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
NADA Protocol for Behavioral Health. Putting Tools in the Hands of Behavioral Health Providers: The Case for Auricular Detoxification Specialists
Received: 29 December 2017 / Revised: 3 February 2018 / Accepted: 4 February 2018 / Published: 7 February 2018
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (757 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Background: The National Acupuncture Detoxification Association (NADA) protocol, a simple standardized auricular treatment has the potential to provide vast public health relief on issues currently challenging our world. This includes but is not limited to addiction, such as the opioid epidemic, but also [...] Read more.
Background: The National Acupuncture Detoxification Association (NADA) protocol, a simple standardized auricular treatment has the potential to provide vast public health relief on issues currently challenging our world. This includes but is not limited to addiction, such as the opioid epidemic, but also encompasses mental health, trauma, PTSD, chronic stress, and the symptoms associated with these conditions. Simple accessible tools that improve outcomes can make profound differences. We assert that the NADA protocol can have greatest impact when broadly applied by behavioral health professionals, Auricular Detoxification Specialists (ADSes). Methods: The concept of ADS is described and how current laws vary from state to state. Using available national data, a survey of practitioners in three selected states with vastly different laws regarding ADSes, and interviews of publicly funded programs which are successfully incorporating the NADA protocol, we consider possible effects of ADS-friendly conditions. Results: Data presented supports the idea that conditions conducive to ADS practice lead to greater implementation. Program interviews reflect settings in which adding ADSes can in turn lead to improved outcomes. Discussion: The primary purpose of non-acupuncturist ADSes is to expand the access of this simple but effective treatment to all who are suffering from addictions, stress, or trauma and to allow programs to incorporate acupuncture in the form of the NADA protocol at minimal cost, when and where it is needed. States that have changed laws to allow ADS practice for this standardized ear acupuncture protocol have seen increased access to this treatment, benefiting both patients and the programs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Auricular Medicine: Gateway to the Brain in Healing)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Association between Auricular Signals and the Risk Factors of Metabolic Syndrome
Received: 13 May 2017 / Revised: 19 June 2017 / Accepted: 19 June 2017 / Published: 25 June 2017
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (958 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Objective: This study aims to determine the association between auricular signals and the risk factors of metabolic syndrome (MS). Methods: A case-control study with an equal number of cases and controls matched by age group and gender was conducted. A total of 204 [...] Read more.
Objective: This study aims to determine the association between auricular signals and the risk factors of metabolic syndrome (MS). Methods: A case-control study with an equal number of cases and controls matched by age group and gender was conducted. A total of 204 participants were recruited. Patients were verified as having MS based on the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) criteria. Auricular assessment was conducted in the following sequence: visual inspection, electrical skin resistance test (ESRT), and pressure pain test (PPT). Results: MS+ patients tend to have much more oily auricle complexion than the controls. The ‘endocrine’ (right) of the participants with MS indicated a significantly higher electrical conductivity compared to that of the controls. The MS group participants experienced significant tenderness on the ‘heart’ and ‘endocrine’ acupoints. A number of auricular signals were also associated with the risk factors of MS, including age, gender, smoking status, family history of diabetes, and comorbid illnesses. Both the ‘heart’ and ‘endocrine’ acupoints showed the highest sensitivity to tenderness (60.8%), followed by the ‘endocrine’ (59.8%) and ‘pancreas and gallbladder’ (55.9%). Conclusions: The results of this study suggest that electrical conductivity and tenderness of a number of auricular points, including the ‘heart’, ‘pancreas and gall bladder’, and ‘endocrine’, are associated with MS and its risk factors. Further investigations with a larger sample size could be conducted to verify the value of these auricular signals on MS risk prediction so that this method can be used as an early screening method for the population with a high MS risk. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Auricular Medicine: Gateway to the Brain in Healing)
Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Editorial, Research, Other

Open AccessReview
Auricular Neuromodulation: The Emerging Concept beyond the Stimulation of Vagus and Trigeminal Nerves
Received: 19 December 2017 / Revised: 12 January 2018 / Accepted: 19 January 2018 / Published: 21 January 2018
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (1202 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Neuromodulation, thanks to intrinsic and extrinsic brain feedback loops, seems to be the best way to exploit brain plasticity for therapeutic purposes. In the past years, there has been tremendous advances in the field of non-pharmacological modulation of brain activity. This review of [...] Read more.
Neuromodulation, thanks to intrinsic and extrinsic brain feedback loops, seems to be the best way to exploit brain plasticity for therapeutic purposes. In the past years, there has been tremendous advances in the field of non-pharmacological modulation of brain activity. This review of different neurostimulation techniques will focus on sites and mechanisms of both transcutaneous vagus and trigeminal nerve stimulation. These methods are scientifically validated non-invasive bottom-up brain modulation techniques, easily implemented from the outer ear. In the light of this, auricles could transpire to be the most affordable target for non-invasive manipulation of central nervous system functions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Auricular Medicine: Gateway to the Brain in Healing)
Figures

Figure 1

Other

Open AccessMeeting Report
Report from the 9th International Symposium on Auriculotherapy Held in Singapore, 10–12 August 2017
Received: 12 June 2017 / Accepted: 13 June 2017 / Published: 26 June 2017
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (396 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Auricular interventions also known as auriculotherapy, auricular medicine and ear acupuncture depending on practice locale, has come of age and has gained the attention of the wider medical community in recent years.[...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Auricular Medicine: Gateway to the Brain in Healing)
Medicines EISSN 2305-6320 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top