Special Issue "Impacts of Land Use and Land Cover Change on Hydrological Systems"

A special issue of Land (ISSN 2073-445X). This special issue belongs to the section "Land Systems and Global Change".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 March 2023 | Viewed by 2583

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Tesfay Gebretsadkan Gebremicael
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Soil and Water Science Department, West Florida Research and Education Center, IFAS, University of Florida, Milton, FL 32583, USA
Interests: hydrology; land use change; soil erosion and sedimentation; soil and water conservation; watershed modelling; spatial analysis
Dr. Ermias Teferi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Center for Environment and Development Studies, College of Development Studies, Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa P.O.Box 1176, Ethiopia
2. Water and Land Resource Center, Rahem Building, Diaspora Square Megenagna, Addis Ababa P.O.Box 3880, Ethiopia
Interests: land surface hydrology; land change; remote sensing; water-related natural hazards; land degradation
Prof. Dr. Woldeamlak Bewket
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Geography & Environmental Studies, Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa, PO Box 1176, Ethiopia
Interests: climate change; water resources; watershed management

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The rapid growth of the global population has increased the pressure on land resources to provide food and shelter. Environmental changes, such as changes in land use/cover, have significantly modified the hydrological systems of catchments. The alteration of existing land surface characteristics can change the dynamics of the hydrological processes by modifying the partitioning of incoming precipitation into different hydrological components and the overall availability of water. Moreover, the timing and magnitude of extreme flows of rivers can also be increased or decreased in response to changes in land use/cover in a given catchment area. Conversion and degradation of land use/cover are also expected to significantly alter rivers' hydrological processes and flow regimes in the future. Overall, change in land use/cover is considered one of the most influential factors that govern hydrological systems, and it is for this reason that the attention of the scientific community has been continuously attracted to understanding the complex relationships of land use/cover and hydrological systems. A continuous investigation of the interaction of land use and hydrological processes is vital for improved water management and sustainable development. Therefore, this Special Issue is envisaged to contribute to our understanding of changes in land use/cover and their impacts on hydrological systems.

This Special Issue is proposed to investigate the impact of land use and land cover change on hydrological systems and contribute to the scientific literature on hydrological responses to human-induced environmental changes.

We welcome researchers to submit their high-quality research on topics including, but not limited to, the following:

  1. Linking land use to hydrological systems at local, regional, and global scales;
  2. Effects of land use change on hydrological processes;
  3. Predictions of future land use change impacts on hydrological regimes;
  4. Assessment of methods, frameworks, and tools;
  5. Management scenarios for improved hydrological systems;
  6. Water productivity of different land use;
  7. How do changes in land use affect the availability and distribution of water resources.

Dr. Tesfay Gebretsadkan Gebremicael
Dr. Ermias Teferi
Prof. Dr. Woldeamlak Bewket
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Land is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • hydrological response
  • land use/cover change
  • run off processes
  • hydrological systems
  • hydrological effects
  • land management

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
A Reconstruction of Irrigated Cropland Extent in China from 2000 to 2019 Using the Synergy of Statistics and Satellite-Based Datasets
Land 2022, 11(10), 1686; https://doi.org/10.3390/land11101686 - 29 Sep 2022
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Abstract
Irrigated agriculture has undergone rapid developments in China, which has greatly increased food production but overexploited water resources as well. Spatial information on irrigated cropland is critical to balance irrigation yield gains against the negative impact on water resources. However, remote-sensing-based maps on [...] Read more.
Irrigated agriculture has undergone rapid developments in China, which has greatly increased food production but overexploited water resources as well. Spatial information on irrigated cropland is critical to balance irrigation yield gains against the negative impact on water resources. However, remote-sensing-based maps on irrigated areas with short temporal coverage often suffer from undermined accuracy in humid areas and inconsistency with statistics, which limit their applications in food policy and water management. The following study integrates existing irrigation maps, observed data on irrigated cropping system, and statistics by a synergy approach to map irrigated areas in China from 2000 to 2019. We also incorporate past information on actual irrigation to avoid divergence between observations and statistics from its fluctuation. Afterwards, 614 reference samples across mainland China have been used to validate resultant maps, which show that outperformance was above overall accuracy and Kappa coefficients. Moreover, our maps share a similar spatial pattern with Irrimap-Syn maps rather than remote-sensing-based maps (CCI-LC). Irrigated areas have grown rapidly from 55.42 Mha in 2000 to 71.33 Mha in 2019 but with different growth trends in different regions. Simultaneous large-scale expansion and abandonment occur in the Huang-Huai-Hai Plain and Yangtze River Basin, while the Northwest Inland Region and the Northeast Plain are the two largest net area gains. Rainfed croplands are dominant sources of expansion, followed by pastures, respectively, with over 70% and 20% contributions in total gains. This not only is a shift from rainfed to irrigated systems but also indicates an intensification of agriculture, which might contribute to agricultural drought reductions in the north and wide soil suitability. Other efforts on agricultural sustainability also have been detected, such as geographical shifts from vulnerable to relatively suitable areas, grain for green, cropland protection, and cropland protection in the competition of urbanization. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Impacts of Land Use and Land Cover Change on Hydrological Systems)
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Article
Analyzing the Effects of Land Cover Change on the Water Balance for Case Study Watersheds in Different Forested Ecosystems in the USA
Land 2022, 11(2), 316; https://doi.org/10.3390/land11020316 - 21 Feb 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1411
Abstract
We analyzed impacts of interannual disturbance on the water balance of watersheds in different forested ecosystem case studies across the United States from 1985 to 2016 using a remotely sensed long-term land cover monitoring record (U.S. Geological Survey Land Change Monitoring, Assessment, and [...] Read more.
We analyzed impacts of interannual disturbance on the water balance of watersheds in different forested ecosystem case studies across the United States from 1985 to 2016 using a remotely sensed long-term land cover monitoring record (U.S. Geological Survey Land Change Monitoring, Assessment, and Projection (LCMAP) Collection 1.0 Science products), gridded precipitation and evaporation data, and streamgaging data using paired watersheds (high and low disturbance). LCMAP products were used to quantify the timing and degree of interannual disturbance and to gain a better understanding of how land cover change affects the water balance of disturbed watersheds. In this paper, we present how LCMAP science products can be used to improve knowledge for hydrologic modeling, climate research, and forest management. Anthropogenic influences (e.g., dams and irrigation diversions) often minimize the impacts of land cover change on water balance dynamics when compared to interannual fluctuations of hydroclimatic events (e.g., drought and flooding). Our findings show that each watershed exhibits a complex suite of influences involving climate variables and other factors that affect each of their water balances differently when land cover change occurs. In this study, forests within arid to semi-arid climates experience greater water balance effects from land cover change than watersheds where water is less limited. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Impacts of Land Use and Land Cover Change on Hydrological Systems)
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