Ocean Conservation and Pollution in an Era of Blue Economy

A special issue of Journal of Marine Science and Engineering (ISSN 2077-1312). This special issue belongs to the section "Marine Environmental Science".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 July 2021) | Viewed by 23040

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. Institute for the Oceans and Fisheries, Faculty of Science, The University of British Columbia, AERL 2202 Main Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada
2. School of Resource and Environmental Management, Simon Fraser University (SFU), Burnaby, BC V5A 1S6, Canada
Interests: marine eco-toxicology; ocean pollution; environmental toxicology and chemistry; bioaccumulation science; food web bioaccumulation modeling of pollutants; climate change; ocean health and conservation; fisheries science and management; conservation biology; zoology; tropical parasitology; environmental and public health

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Guest Editor
Department of Environmental Studies, University of New England, Biddeford, ME, USA
Interests: biodiversity; conservation biology; conservation; ecology; marine ecology; rivers marine environment; marine biodiversity; fish ecology; fisheries

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

As an editorial initiative of the Journal of Marine Science & Engineering (JMSE), we are proud to announce that we are launching a Special Issue titled “Ocean Conservation and Pollution in an Era of Blue Economy”

Ocean pollution is one of the main causes affecting the health and conservation of the global ocean. The physical, chemical, and biological components of our oceans are being changed and reshaped because of a myriad of anthropogenic activities and threats jeopardizing the quality of the oceans and marine biodiversity inhabiting this unique realm in planet Earth. In the renaissance of the Blue Economy, ocean problems and solutions should be prioritized for an environmentally sustainable and socially equitable use of the oceans. The proactive and precautionary conservation of the ocean is key for the survival of marine species and the wellbeing of human beings. The aim of this Special Issue is to create an organized, comprehensive, and interactive collection of several contributions (i.e., original research articles, reviews, short communications, and opinions/policy essays) regarding the state of ocean conservation and impacts by biological and chemical pollution resulting from human-made activities in concert with the imperative vision of the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) for Life Below Water (SDG 14) to envision ocean solutions to control, mitigate, and eliminate marine pollution.

We welcome contributions from ocean scientists, marine ecotoxicologists, coastal and civil engineers, environmental engineers, oceanographers, social scientists and maritime anthropologists, environmental and fisheries economists in academia, government, industry, and non-governmental organizations that aim to highlight scientific advancements, new knowledge, and solution-oriented research within this Special Issue.

As Guest Editor, I would like to cordially express my invitation and encourage you to contribute to this topic.

Looking forward to hearing from you.

Dr. Juan José Alava
Dr. Marcia Moreno-Baez
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Marine Science and Engineering is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Ocean pollution
  • Persistent Organic Pollutants
  • metals
  • mercury
  • pharmaceuticals and personal care products
  • ocean plastic
  • microplastics
  • harmful algal blooms
  • ocean pollution solutions
  • marine biodiversity
  • fisheries
  • ocean conservation
  • Anthropocene
  • Blue Economy
  • Sustainable Development Goals (SDG)

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

16 pages, 6855 KiB  
Article
Summer Wind Effects on Coastal Upwelling in the Southwestern Yellow Sea
by Bin Wang, Lei Wu, Ning Zhao, Tianran Liu and Naoki Hirose
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2021, 9(9), 1021; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse9091021 - 17 Sep 2021
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2546
Abstract
The features of coastal upwelling in the southwestern Yellow Sea were investigated based on oceanology data from a research cruise and a regional circulation model. The observation data suggest that a relatively colder and saltier water core exists from the deeper layer to [...] Read more.
The features of coastal upwelling in the southwestern Yellow Sea were investigated based on oceanology data from a research cruise and a regional circulation model. The observation data suggest that a relatively colder and saltier water core exists from the deeper layer to the surface, off the Subei Bank. The concentrations of nutrients also suggest that coastal upwelling is beneficial for nutrient enrichment in the upper layer. The numerical simulations are in good agreement with oceanology observations. Furthermore, sensitivity experiments indicate that, in addition to the tidal-induced upwelling and tidal mixing proposed in previous studies, the summer monsoon is also critical to vertical circulation in the southwestern Yellow Sea. The southwesterly wind stress and positive wind stress curl make considerable contributions to upwelling off the Subei coast compared with tidal motions. Moreover, this study also proposes that changes in the summer monsoon and its curl may have been helpful to the formation of upwelling during the past decade, which may have provided a favorable marine environment for the frequent occurrence of green tides. This study provides a theoretical basis for the mechanisms of coastal upwelling and the nitrogen cycle in the Yellow Sea. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ocean Conservation and Pollution in an Era of Blue Economy)
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16 pages, 933 KiB  
Article
A Review of the Production, Recycling and Management of Marine Plastic Pollution
by Ibrahim Issifu and U. Rashid Sumaila
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2020, 8(11), 945; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse8110945 - 20 Nov 2020
Cited by 25 | Viewed by 12709
Abstract
The human attachment to plastic has intensified recently due to its lightweight, versatility, low-cost and durability and so has the damage to the marine environment as marine plastic pollution has correspondingly increased. As a result, there has been increasing concern on the issue [...] Read more.
The human attachment to plastic has intensified recently due to its lightweight, versatility, low-cost and durability and so has the damage to the marine environment as marine plastic pollution has correspondingly increased. As a result, there has been increasing concern on the issue of marine plastic pollution. Policy-based organizations such as the United Nations Environment Programme have drawn public attention to the scope, magnitude and impacts of marine pollution in recent decades. Research on marine pollution can play a significant role in contributing to policy-making processes in support of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goal on Life Below Water (SDG 14), by providing scientific analysis on the effects and sources of marine plastic pollution. This paper provides a theoretical and empirical overview of marine plastic pollution and its potential effects on marine ecosystems. It also discusses SDGs that are relevant to marine plastic pollution and suggest priorities for further research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ocean Conservation and Pollution in an Era of Blue Economy)
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22 pages, 5146 KiB  
Article
Evaluation of a Dynamic Bioremediation System for the Removal of Metal Ions and Toxic Dyes Using Sargassum Spp.
by J. Luis López-Miranda, Rodolfo Silva, Gustavo A. Molina, Rodrigo Esparza, A. R. Hernandez-Martinez, J. Hernández-Carteño and Miriam Estévez
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2020, 8(11), 899; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse8110899 - 11 Nov 2020
Cited by 21 | Viewed by 3714
Abstract
This work presents the results obtained in the design and manufacture of a simple, economic and ecological filter based on Sargassum spp. (Sspp), consisting of the species S. natans and S. fluitans, for the elimination of organic and inorganic toxic substances. The [...] Read more.
This work presents the results obtained in the design and manufacture of a simple, economic and ecological filter based on Sargassum spp. (Sspp), consisting of the species S. natans and S. fluitans, for the elimination of organic and inorganic toxic substances. The main objective is to make use of Sspp, as the massive amounts of this alga arriving at the Mexican Caribbean coast have caused serious problems over recent years. The toxic substances treated were organic dyes (methyl blue, methyl orange and methyl red) and the metal ion, lead (II). To obtain optimal removal conditions, grinding of the Sspp used, its mass and humidity were evaluated. In the design of the filter the area, flow rate and the number of layers were evaluated. Removal rates of almost 100%, 65% and 25% were obtained for methylene blue, methyl red and methyl orange respectively, and in the case of lead (II), values up to 95% were obtained. After the tests, the Sspp was characterized, using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy, showing the presence of the dyes and the ionic species. These results demonstrate the efficiency of the dynamic Sspp-based filtration system proposed, which can be industrially scaled for the treatment of water contaminated with these kinds of substances. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ocean Conservation and Pollution in an Era of Blue Economy)
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9 pages, 1946 KiB  
Communication
Knowledge Translation Supports Community Conservation Efforts to Protect and Restore a Local Marine Environment: A Case Study of Átl’ḵa7tsem/Txwnéwu7ts/Howe Sound, British Columbia, Canada
by Jennifer Chapman, Amber Dearden and Aroha Miller
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2020, 8(10), 739; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse8100739 - 24 Sep 2020
Viewed by 2755
Abstract
Individuals, communities, organizations, and governments are the building blocks of economies. All require awareness, information, and achievable actions to contribute to moving towards healthy oceans, the base of a robust blue economy. Ocean Watch, a program run by Ocean Wise Conservation Association, was [...] Read more.
Individuals, communities, organizations, and governments are the building blocks of economies. All require awareness, information, and achievable actions to contribute to moving towards healthy oceans, the base of a robust blue economy. Ocean Watch, a program run by Ocean Wise Conservation Association, was created to translate scientific understanding, combined with community and traditional knowledge, to empower local action for improved marine health. Clear improvements have been made in the Átl’ḵa7tsem/Txwnéwu7ts/Howe Sound marine environment, which have been captured in an updated report following from the original 2017 publication. Information within the reports illustrates the connection of communities and the marine environment through articles describing seven themes, which are: (1) Species and Habitat; (2) Clean Water; (3) Sense of Place; (4) Coastal Development and Livelihoods; (5) Stewardship and Governance; (6) Oceanography and Climate Change; and (7) Seafood. Articles such as the 2017 article: “Sea Stars: wasting disease taking its toll” gave background, rationale for importance, current status, current actions, and recommended actions to improve the health status (healthy, caution, critical, limited/no data). The health status for 10 of 28 reassessed articles improved largely due to actions taken by local communities, as recommended in the 2017 report. However, more work is needed, especially for areas of marine health that were not improving and to address threats from climate change. Establishing a sustainable socio-ecological relationship with the ocean is necessary if we are to protect and restore the health of all components of the ecosystem. Empowering communities to take action improves ocean health, which is inherently linked to the health of individuals, communities, and economies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ocean Conservation and Pollution in an Era of Blue Economy)
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